Posts Tagged With: Pearl Harbor

Forbidden Photos Reveal What Life In Hawaii Was Like After Pearl Harbor….


It’s no secret that the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor, which killed more than 2,000 Americans, changed the course of history for the United States and the rest of the world.

But it also dramatically altered the identity of the island paradise of Hawaii, changing everyday life for the people who lived there and bringing tourism, one of the islands’ most important industries, to a halt.

PHOTO 12 VIA GETTY IMAGES
The West Virginia and Tennessee battleships are ablaze after the Pearl Harbor attack Dec. 7, 1941.

Hours after the attack, Hawaii, a U.S. territory at the time, was placed under martial law, and all of the islands’ residents were under the dictatorship of the U.S. military, according to Honolulu Bishop Museum historian DeSoto Brown.

Since Japanese-Americans made up 37 percent of Hawaii’s population, it was impossible for the military to incarcerate all of them, Brown told The Huffington Post. Instead, all residents of Hawaii — white, Native Hawaiian, Japanese, Filipino, Chinese — were forced to live under strict military rule.

“Everybody was under martial law and treated equally unfairly because the military couldn’t target just the Japanese, who were so important to the economy,” Brown said.

After all, Japanese-American residents had long-established themselves in Hawaii as business owners, teachers and community leaders. Without them, Brown added, Hawaii’s economy would have collapsed.

BETTMANN VIA GETTY IMAGES
A newspaper photo shows two Japanese-American workers at an emergency medical unit in Honolulu, with the caption saying they are “typical of the loyal Japanese-Americans in the Islands; they have been on continuous duty since the attack on December 7.”

Under martial law, life in Hawaii became dramatically restricted, according to Brown. Immediately after the attack, civilians were mandated by the military to dig holes for makeshift bomb shelters and were ordered to place barbed wire around everything, including beaches, water pumping stations, electrical installations and government buildings.

While they were free to live their normal lives during the day, Hawaii residents were forced to black out their windows, and a curfew banned civilians from being outside at night.

All electricity was required to be shut off after sundown, and the military enforced the curfew every night. Any unauthorized civilian out after hours faced the risk of being shot. If civilians were permitted to drive after-hours for official purposes, they were required to paint their cars’ headlights black.

Food on the island was rationed to families. There was a ban on liquor, and bars were shuttered. Waikiki’s iconic beachfront hotels, once thriving with tourists and affluent locals, were closed to the public and taken over by the military.

The military even banned Hawaii civilians from taking photographs of any of the islands’ coastlines (to prevent the Japanese from finding points of entries) and anything with war- or military-related imagery. As a result, officials reviewed and confiscated any photographs that contained barbed wire, beaches or military bases.

BISHOP MUSEUM/DESOTO BROWN
Barbed wire was installed at Waikiki Beach and other coastlines across Hawaii after the 1941 attacks on Pearl Harbor.

The harsh military rule in Hawaii ended nearly three years after the Pearl Harbor attacks, but, according to Brown, the islands were forever changed.

The poor treatment of the residents in Hawaii fueled the case for bringing the islands into statehood. And the military continued to maintain a stronghold in Hawaii, with every branch of the military stationed there today.

As a historian specializing in World War II and the attacks on Pearl Harbor, Brown has collected many of the contraband images that were photographed in Hawaii despite martial law.

Many of these images are on display at the Bishop Museum in Honolulu for the 75th anniversary of the devastating attacks.

Below, see the forbidden photos and other World War II memorabilia that reveal what life in Hawaii was like for those who lived through that day “which will live in infamy,” Dec. 7, 1941.

  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    A curfew was imposed by the military government on all civilians in Hawaii, which lasted for nearly the entire war. Without some sort of curfew pass like this one, citizens could be arrested after curfew.
  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    A printed schedule for Hawaii’s very strict nightly blackout, which began Dec. 7, 1941, and was gradually eased until it was eliminated in 1944.
  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    A blacked-out restaurant in downtown Honolulu, 1942.
  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    Pins like these showed a commitment to winning the war, but they also provided manufacturers some quick income.
  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    The patriotic slogan “Remember Pearl Harbor” was widely printed in the early war years. This sticker uses a snake to symbolize the treacherous sneak attack on Dec. 7, 1941.
  • National Archives
    Barbed wire along the front of the Royal Hawaiian Hotel in Waikiki, taken over by the U.S. Navy and used throughout the war only for military personnel.
  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    During World War II, Waikiki’s luxury Royal Hawaiian Hotel was seized by the Navy and was open only to military personnel, seen here in the hotel’s Coconut Grove.
  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    Gas masks were issued to all Hawaii civilians over the age of 7, and practices like this one were held to prepare for poison gas attacks or air raids.
  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    Every citizen of the Hawaiian Islands was required to be fingerprinted and issued an official ID card like this one. Under martial law, this card had to be carried at all times.
Categories: Emperor, Uncategorized, WWII | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sunday, December 7th, 1941–Admiral Chester Nimitz…..


Sunday, December 7th, 1941–Admiral Chester Nimitz was attending a concert in Washington D.C. He was paged and told there was a phone call for him. When he answered the phone, it was President Franklin Delano Roosevelt on the phone. He told Admiral Nimitz that he (Nimitz) would now be the Commander of the Pacific Fleet.

Admiral Nimitz flew to Hawaii to assume command of the Pacific Fleet.
He landed at Pearl Harbor on Christmas Eve, 1941.
There was such a spirit of despair, dejection and defeat–you would have thought the Japanese had already won the war.
On Christmas Day, 1941, Adm. Nimitz was given a boat tour of the destruction wrought on Pearl Harbor by the Japanese. Big sunken battleships and navy vessels cluttered the waters every where you looked.

As the tour boat returned to dock, the young helmsman of the boat asked, “Well Admiral, what do you think
after seeing all this destruction?” Admiral Nimitz’s reply shocked everyone within the sound of his voice.

Admiral Nimitz said, “The Japanese made three of the biggest mistakes an attack force could ever make, or God was taking care of America. Which do you think it was?”

Shocked and surprised, the young helmsman asked, “What do mean by saying the Japanese made the three biggest mistakes an attack force ever made?” Nimitz explained…

Mistake number one : the Japanese attacked on Sunday morning.
Nine out of every ten crewmen of those ships were ashore on leave.
If those same ships had been lured to sea and been sunk–we would have
lost 38,000 men instead of 3,800.

Mistake number two : when the Japanese saw all those battleships lined in a row, they got so carried away sinking those battleships, they never once bombed our dry docks opposite those ships. If they had destroyed our dry docks, we would have had to tow every one of those ships to America to be repaired.
As it is now, the ships are in shallow water and can be raised. One tug can pull them over to the dry docks, and we can have them repaired and at sea by the time we could have towed them to America . And I already have crews ashore anxious to man those ships.

Mistake number three: Every drop of fuel in the Pacific theater of war is in top of the ground storage tanks five miles away over that hill. One attack plane could have strafed those tanks and destroyed our fuel supply .
That’s why I say the Japanese made three of the biggest mistakes an attack force could make or God was taking care of America.

There is a reason that our national motto is,
IN GOD WE TRUST

Why have we forgotten?

Categories: Politics, Strange News, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Some almost unknown WWII History…….


1. The first German serviceman killed in WW II was killed by the Japanese ().China, 1937

The first American serviceman killed was killed by the Russians (Finland 1940); highest ranking American killed was Lt. Gen Lesley McNair, killed by the US Army Air Corps. So much for allies.

2. The youngest US serviceman was 12 year old: Calvin Graham, USN. He was wounded and given a Dishonorable Discharge for lying about his age. His benefits were later restored by act of Congress.

3. At the time of Pearl Harbor, the top US Navy command was called CINCUS (pronounced ‘sink us’); the shoulder patch of the US Army’s 45th Infantry division was the Swastika, and Hitler’s private train was named ‘Amerika.’ All three were soon changed for PR purposes.

4. More US servicemen died in the Air Corps than the Marine Corps. [Actually the 8th Air Force alone suffered about 5,000 more KIA than the entire Marine Corps in WW2.] While completing the required 30 missions, an airman’s chance of being killed was 71%.

5. Generally speaking, there was no such thing as an average fighter pilot. You were either an ace or a target. For instance, Japanese Ace Hiroyoshi Nishizawa shot down over 80 planes. He died while a passenger on a cargo plane.

6. It was a common practice on fighter planes to load every 5th round with a tracer round to aid in aiming. This was a mistake. Tracers had different ballistics, so (at long range) if your tracers were hitting the target, 80% of your rounds were missing. Worse yet tracers, instantly told your enemy he was under fire and from which direction. Worst of all was the practice of loading a string of tracers at the end of the belt to tell you that you were out of ammo. This was definitely not something you wanted to tell the enemy. Units that stopped using tracers saw their success rate nearly double and their loss rate go down.

7. When allied armies reached the Rhine, the first thing men did was pee in it. This was pretty universal from the lowest private to Winston Churchill (who made a big show of it) and Gen. Patton (who had himself photographed in the act).

8. German Me-264 bombers were capable of bombing New York City, but they decided it wasn’t worth the effort.

9. German submarine U-1206 was sunk by a malfunctioning toilet.

10. Among the first ‘Germans’ captured at Normandy were several Koreans. They had been forced to fight for the Japanese Army until they were captured by the Russians and forced to fight for the Russian Army until they were captured by the Germans and forced to fight for the German Army until they were captured by the US Army.

11. Following a massive naval bombardment, 35,000 United States and Canadian troops stormed ashore at Kiska, in the Aleutian Islands . 21 troops were killed in the assault on the island. It could have been worse if there had been any Japanese on the island.

12. The last Marine killed in WW2 was killed by a can of Spam. He was on the ground as a POW in Japan when rescue flights dropping food and supplies came over, the package came apart in the air and a stray can of Spam hit him and killed him..

Categories: Strange News, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Pearl Harbor…Dec 7th, 1941…Will History repeat and once again we suffer….


battleships-aflame-on-battleship-row-alongside-ford-island

battleships-west-virginia-and-tennessee-burning

cars-that-were-strafed-by-japanese-aircraft-pictured-at-naval-air-station-kaneohe-hawaii-in-the-aftermath-of-the-japanese-attack-on-pearl-harbor

heavy-damage-is-seen-on-the-uss-casin-and-the-uss-downes

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one-of-the-propellers-of-the-battleship-oklahoma

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photo-from-a-captured-japanese-aircraft-taken-during-the-initial-moments-of-the-japanese-attack-on-pearl-harbor-note-the-japanese-aircraft-visible-at-upper-right-flying-over-naval-air-station-ford-island

sailors-at-naval-air-station-kaneohe-hawaii-attempt-to-salvage-a-burning-pby-catalina-in-the-aftermath-of-the-japanese-attack-on-pearl-harbor

the-battleship-nevada-burns-in-the-aftermath-of-the-japanese-attack-on-pearl-harbor

the-battleship-uss-arizona-belches-smoke-as-it-topples-over-into-the-sea

the-destroyer-shaw-explodes-during-the-japanese-attack

the-uss-california-on-fire-in-pearl-harbor-after-the-japanese-attack

the-wreckage-of-american-planes-bombed-by-the-japanese

view-of-the-airfield-at-naval-air-station-ford-island-and-flames-from-burning-ships-in-the-background-taken-during-the-japanese-attack

aerial-view-of-battleship-row-in-the-opening-moments-of-the-japanese-attack-on-pearl-harbor

aerial-view-of-battleship-row-next-to-ford-island-after-japanese-planes-launched-a-torpedo-attack

aerial-view-of-the-initial-blows-struck-against-american-ships-as-seen-from-a-japanese-plane-over-pearl-harbor

a-japanese-bomber-on-a-run-over-pearl-harbor-hawaii-is-shown-during-the-surprise-attack-of-dec-7-1941-black-smoke-rises-from-american-ships-in-the-harbor

american-ships-burning

antiaircraft-bursts-dot-the-sky-above-smoking-ships-in-pearl-harbor

a-small-boat-rescues-a-uss-west-virginia-crew-member-from-the-water-after-the-japanese-bombing-of-pearl-harbor

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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