Posts Tagged With: New York

Cruz officially eliminated from GOP race….


After being demolished in last night’s New York primary, it is officially impossible for Texas Sen. Ted Cruz to earn enough delegates to win the GOP presidential nomination outright.

But with Cruz still hoping to steal the nomination in a so-called brokered convention, don’t expect his campaign to be talking about his delegate math problems any time soon.

Cruz was humiliated in New York, where he finished a distant third to billionaire Donald Trump and Ohio Gov. John Kasich. More importantly, he failed to win a single delegate.

Trump won at least 89 of the 95 delegates at stake. John Kasich won at least three, and Cruz was completely shut out.

And that poor performance mathematically eliminated Cruz from being able to accumulate enough delegates to head to the Republican National Convention as the party’s presumptive nominee.

If the process was being run fairly, Cruz and Kasich would be out and headed home.

There aren’t enough delegates left in future contests for either Cruz or Kasich to reach the 1,237 delegates needed to win the GOP nomination.

Their only hope is to block Trump and force a contested convention. The total delegate count stands as: Trump 845, Cruz 559, and Kasich 147.

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Lost Treasure of Dutch Schultz


Arthur Flegenheimer, also known as Dutch Schultz, was a New York City gangster during the 1920’s and 30’s. He was born to German Jewish immigrants Emma and Herman Flegenheimer August 6, 1902. His profession, organized crime, netted him a fortune before his death October 23, 1935.

Schultz’s gang related activities included practices such as boot legging alcohol, murder and running a numbers racket. Dutch Schultz had a long criminal history and was once declared Public Enemy #1 by the FBI. Rumors abound Schultz buried millions in Phoenicia, New York, in the Catskills region shortly before his death. However, to date it hasn’t been found.

It was while Federal Prosecutor Thomas E. Dewey was pursuing him on income tax evasion charges Schultz decided to stash his money. He had seen many others incarcerated, and when they reentered society, found their former territories taken over by rival gangsters. So he gathered up his millions he had earned in ill gotten gains and buried it somewhere.

Some say his treasure was all in currency, others say it was double-eagle gold pieces, while still others describe it as a combination of cash, gold, and jewels. The value of the hoarded treasure is also at question. Some versions of the story say $5 million, while other versions claim it was $7 or even $9 million. Whatever the amount was, it was supposedly gathered into tobacco sacks, stored in either an iron box or steel suitcase and hidden away.

An Angry Schultz
An Angry Schultz

Last Dying Words

It was only upon Schultz’s death the existence of this treasure was discovered. On his deathbed, a police stenographer recorded every word Schultz uttered between bouts of fever induced delirium. Itwas mostly nonsense, but some think there may have been a few vague, veiled references to his treasure.

When Schultz’s last dying words hit the newspapers it spawned as many versions of the buried treasure as there were stories of the Dutchman himself. Even while he was dying from gunshot wounds to the colon, liver, spleen, and stomach he refused to name his associates the men who shot him, or the whereabouts of his fortune.

A Mysterious Map

Many theories about the treasure evolved, most involving Phoenicia, and a mysterious map, supposedly drawn by another mobster, Lulu Rosenkranz, in case the location should ever be forgotten.

Several story versions place the location along Route 28 between the roadway and the Esopus Creek. Others believe it’s along railroad tracks leading into Phoenicia. Perhaps the most popular version is Schultz and Lulu Rosenkranz carried a steel safe to Phoenicia on an April night in 1933 and buried it in a grove of pine trees near the Esopus, with an “X” marking the tree under which they buried it.

A more detailed version of the events was revealed by a man over 80 years old who claimed to have first-hand knowledge of the day Schultz buried his treasure. His account has the treasure being buried the fateful afternoon Schultz and his gang were ambushed at the Palace Chop House.

According to the old timer Dutch and one of his men, probably Rosenkranz, stopped for lunch at the Phoenicia Hotel, in the center of town. Around one o’clock they left in a car got in a car, and drove onto Route 214. They proceeded north along the Stony Clove Creek for about eight miles, and hid their loot beneath a skull-shaped rock known as the Devil’s Face. They were back in Phoenicia by three o’clock. From there they returned to Newark…and the rest is history.

Another Phoenicia old-timer, Mickey Simpson, remembered Schultz well. He had his own thoughts about the treasure. “Sure,” he said in 1991, “Schultz might have buried his loot by the Esopus Creek, but if he did, it’s long gone.” Simpson was obviously referring to a number of serious floods over the years. “… and surely even an iron box couldn’t have survived them all. “Personally, I wouldn’t step off this porch for it,” Simpson continued. “It’s probably somewhere at the bottom of the Ashokan Reservoir.”

There are also local stories residents like to tell such as the elderly man who used to walk along the railroad tracks digging holes. When questioned about what he was digging for, he would simply reply, “Dutch Schultz’s buried treasure.” The railroad finally made him stop.

And a Phoenicia motel operator used to let treasure hunters dig on his property. However they first had to sign a legal document promising him a split if they found anything. He soon learned he wasn’t as smart as he thought he was. A particularly resourceful treasure hunter showed up one day with a backhoe. He dug dozens of holes and left without filling them back in. The motel operator abandoned the practice.

Schultz met his end on a Wednesday evening, October 23, 1935. It happened at the Palace Chop House and Tavern in Newark, New Jersey. A group of four well dressed men made their way to a secluded private dining room in the back of the establishment…Schultz was one of the four. After ordering drinks and dinner, the men began talking business. By 10:00 pm the bar and restaurant were empty except for the four diners, a couple on the dance floor upstairs, the bartender and a few employees in the kitchen.

Two men entered, one with a shotgun and the other brandishing a pistol. The two men made their way to the dining room, and opened fire. Three men at the table were shot and wounded. The fourth, the intended “hit”, was found in the bathroom. Schultz, and his three associates were mortally wounded.

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EMPIRE STATE REBELLION: Hundred of Thousands of New Yorkers Refuse To Register So-Called “Assault Weapons” Ahead Of April 15 Deadline…..


Due the the tyrannical actions of Andrew Cuomo and his allies in the state legislature,  New York residents are required to register an estimated 1 million firearms designated as “assault weapons” under the NY SAFE Act by April 15.

Unfortunately for the Governor and his allies, it appears that the open revolt of most of the state’s law enforcement leaders against NY SAFE—who correctly view the law as a blatantly unconstitutional assault on the state constitution and the Second Amendment—means that noncompliance is overwhelming.

While NY State Police refuse to publicly share the number of firearms that have been registered (citing a provision of the NY SAFE Act itself), leaks purporting to be from within the agency suggest that compliance might be as low as just 3,000-5,000 firearms. There is no way to conclusively verify this paltry figure which suggests that 99.5% of New Yorkers are thumbing their noses at Albany, but it may very well be a credible figure.

Why?

Non-compliance rates of 85%-90% or more are the rule when draconian gun control laws demanding registration are passed in the United States. Those rates are normal even with relatively popular support from voters and law enforcement. Those dynamics of “popular support” are assuredly not in play in New York.

While gun registration may be exceedingly popular south of the Tappan Zee Bridge, and in a few pockets upstate, many (if not most) law enforcement officers and gun owners in the state have publicly rebelled against the law. Many municipal and county governments have joined them in open defiance. Gun owners in New York are well aware of the fact that their county sheriffs, state police, and local officers don’t intend to enforce the law, a stance that many law enforcement leaders have announced publicly.

Knowing that the chief law enforcement officers in most counties have announced that they will not enforce the law, a non-compliance rate exceeding 95% and perhaps exceeding 98% does indeed seem plausible.

As New York Assemblyman Bill Nojay (R-Pittsford) noted previously:

“The rank and file troopers don’t want anything to do with it,” Assemblyman Bill Nojay (R-Pittsford) said Monday. “I don’t know of a single sheriff upstate who is going to enforce it.”

“If you don’t have the troopers and you don’t have the sheriffs, who have you got? You’ve got Andrew Cuomo pounding on the table in Albany,” Nojay said.

Andrew Cuomo has demonstrated that he has the political power to ram through unconstitutional laws in Albany. What he’s also unwittingly exposed is his complete inability to enforce them.

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Maybe there are a few that should think about this……2nd Amendment


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Quarter-Sized Pink Diamond Sets Record at Auction


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A pink diamond the size of a U.S. quarter sets a record at auction, selling at Christie’s in New York for more than $39 million. The 35-carat ‘Princie’ golconda pink diamond was once owned by the royal family of Hyderabad in India. The winning bidder is anonymous.

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How things have changed…. 1908…..New York. “Times Square” The old New York Times building, now encased in billboards, Hotel Astor and various theaters seen from Broadway.


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Muscle Beach…. 1905….Coney Island, New York…Boys on the Prowl…


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Parade…1900….Buffalo, New York. “Labor Day parade, Main Street”


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Old Photo….1904…New York. “The Ponies, Coney Island”


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Mass killings have a long history…….not a new event


He came along with a shotgun on his shoulder while a group of children were playing in front of the school. Without warning or provocation, he raised the gun to his shoulder, took deliberate aim, and fired into the crowd of boys.

Although it sounds sadly modern, the account was published in the New York Times more than a century ago.

Dated April 10, 1891, the article described an elderly man firing a shotgun at children playing in front of St. Mary’s Parochial School in Newburgh, NY.

“None of the children were killed, but several were well filled with lead,” the report said.

More than a century earlier, on July 26, 1764, a teacher and 10 students were shot dead by four Lenape American Indians in Greencastle, Pennsylvania, in what is considered the earliest known U.S. mass school shooting.

Indeed, killing or trying to kill a mass of people is not a modern phenomenon. For as long as there has been history, there have been gruesome mass murders.

“The terms amok, a Malayan word, and berserk, a Norse word, have been used to describe individuals going on killing sprees. Both terms have been around for centuries, which reflects the fact that mass murder is neither a modern nor a uniquely American phenomenon,” Grant Duwe,director of research at the Minnesota Department of Corrections, told Discovery News.
Defined as bloody events that occur within a 24-hour period and that involve a minimum of four victims, mass murders have occurred all over the world, in different times, societies and cultures.

Some of the earliest recorded cases include the 1893 killing with guns and swords of 11 people (including an infant) in Osaka, Japan, the 1914 shooting of 7 people in the Italian village of Camerata Cornello, not to mention the case of German spree killer Ernst August Wagner.
In 1913, he stabbed to death his wife and four children in Degerloch, near Stuttgart, then drove to Mühlhausen an der Enz where he opened fire on 20 people, killing at least nine, leaving two animals dead and several buildings burned to the ground.

In 1927, South African farmer Stephanus Swart shot dead at least 8 people and injured 3 others in Charlestown, South Africa, before committing suicide.

In 1938 almost half of the population of the rural village of Kaio, near Tsuyama city in Japan, was murdered as 21-year-old Mutsuo Toi killed 30 people with a shotgun, sword and axe, injured three others and then shot himself to death.

Between 1954 and 1957, William Unek murdered a total of 57 people in two separate spree killings in the Belgian Congo.

He first killed 21 people with an axe, then shot dead ten men, eight women and eight children, slaughtered six more men with the axe, burned two women and a child, and strangled a 15-year-old girl.
More recently in the bloody timeline of shooting sprees, some of the most dramatic incidents include the 1987 Hungerford massacre in England, where gun enthusiast Michael Ryan shot 16 people dead and wounded another 15 before committing suicide, the 1996 Port Arthur massacre in Australia, where 28 year old Martin Bryant killed 35 people and wounded 21 before being caught by police, and the 1996 school shooting in the Scottish town of Dunblane.

There, failed shopkeeper Thomas Hamilton opened fire at a primary school, killing 16 children and a teacher before turning his gun on his mouth.

“I could have been one of those children,” tennis player Andy Murray wrote in his autobiography, “Hitting Back.”

Britain’s highest ranked player, Murray was eight when Hamilton burst into the school and began shooting. He and his 10-year-old brother Jamie escaped the fire by hiding under a desk.

In the United States, two mass murder waves characterized the 20th century. One appeared in the 1920s and 30s and another in the mid-1960s, following a tranquil period in the 1940s and 50s.

The two waves, however, were qualitatively different, according to Duwe.

The author of “Mass Murder in the United States: A History,” Duwe researched 909 cases of mass killing that occurred in the United States between 1900 and 1999.

“The first mass murder wave in the 1920s and 30s was comprised mainly of familicides and felony-related massacres, which, then as now, are less likely to garner extensive media coverage,” Duwe said.

On the contrary, the second mass murder wave from the mid-1960s through the mid-1990s consisted of a greater number of mass public shootings, similar to the recent Aurora movie theater shooting and Newtown school shooting.

These incidents “have always captured a great deal of interest and concern,” Duwe said.

Marked by the 1966 Texas Tower shootings where student Charles Whitman climbed a 27-story tower on the University of Texas campus shooting dead 14 people and wounding 31 others, the mid-1960s do not actually represent the beginning of an unprecedented mass murder wave in the United States.

“Since 1900, the highest mass murder rate was in 1929. Mass public shootings are one of several types of mass murder and generally account for roughly 10-15 percent of all mass killings in the U.S.,” Duwe said.

According to the criminologists, the 1990s had the highest number of mass public shootings with a little more than 40 — an average of a little more than 4 each year.

The number of mass public shootings dropped below 30 in the years between 2000 and 2009.

“This year, however, the U.S. has had at least seven mass public shootings, which is the highest number since 1999,” Duwe said.

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