Posts Tagged With: Mountains

Utah…Lost Treasure…The Lost House Range Placers…


The Lost House Range Placers….

The explorers and surveyors of the American West are an august company that includes the great Lewis and Clark as well as a host of other renowned pathfinders. Men like Fremont, Long, Stansbury, Pike, Abert, and Beale opened up the west as surely as the mountain men who preceded them and the sutlers and traders who followed them. One of the most promising of these early explorers and surveyors was an Army engineer and West Point graduate named John W. Gunnison.

The idea of an intercontinental railroad stretching from coast to coast was not new in 1853. Fremont’s expeditions during the 1840’s were focused on finding the best route through the mountains for a railroad. In 1853, when an expedition was mounted to survey the west-central portion of Utah, John Gunnison was a natural choice to lead the party. His credentials were impeccable. He had cut his teeth as a surveyor for the Stansbury Expedition in 1849 and he knew the central Utah area well. Gunnison assumed command of the party, which included two survivors from Fremont’s disastrous fourth expedition of 1848, Richard Kern and Frederick Creutzfeldt. Kern was the expedition’s artist and topographer while Creutzfeldt served as botanist. The Gunnison expedition entered Utah Territory in the fall of 1853, passing through the town of Manti on its way to Fillmore. From Fillmore, the party traveled west, reaching the Gunnison Bend of the Sevier River, southwest of present-day Delta. To the west, Gunnison could see the wrinkled peaks of the House Range rising up from the Sevier Valley. To the southwest, he could see the meandering course of the Sevier River as it disappeared toward Sevier Lake. This was a good place. They made camp.

The following morning, the Gunnison Expedition awoke to the sounds of war cries and rifle shots. The end had come. A band of 30 or so Pahvant Indians descended upon the hapless explorers, killing all but four of the party. The dead included the leader, John Gunnison, and the two veterans from Fremont’s expedition, Kern and Creutzfeldt.

As he gazed westward the evening before the massacre, Gunnison may have been contemplating a route through the House Range into the Tule Valley beyond. The House Range stretches some 60 miles in a north-south direction and forms the western boundary of Sevier Valley. It extends from Sand Pass southward to the Wah-Wah Valley. Along its entire length the range is no more than 10 miles wide. House Range is transected by three major passes. Dome Canyon Pass is the northernmost pass, Marjum Canyon lies eight miles to the south, and Skull Rock Pass, south of Sawtooth Mountain, forms the southernmost and main portal through the range.

The House Range still holds many secrets. Prospectors have roamed these mountains for over two centuries. Evidence of early Spanish mining activity still occasionally surfaces. Caches of old Spanish tools and mining equipment have been discovered in the central part of the range, near the only major gold-producing area in the entire county.

Millard County has never been a major producer of gold. Only 500 ounces are officially recorded for the county. Most of this production hails from the small placer deposits of the House Range. Located in North Canyon and Miller Canyon, the gold placers were worked extensively during the 1930’s. Surely more than 500 ounces of gold were taken from the two canyons during the depression years, not to mention the efforts of the early Spaniards in the area. One story in particular has come down to us regarding an incredibly rich placer deposit somewhere in the House Range. In a single transaction, the discoverer of this placer sold more than 300 ounces of gold – 60% of the total recorded production for the entire county! The discovery occurred sometime during the late 1930’s. A Mexican sheepherder working in the House Range stumbled upon a glory hole of placer gold somewhere on the slopes of the mountains. The deposit must have been rich for the Mexican turned up in the nearby town of Delta with several sacks of fine gold dust. On one of his visits, the sheepherder sold more than 20 pounds of gold to a local doctor. Of course, the Mexican never revealed the location of his find and soon dropped out of sight. He was never seen again. Prospectors have searched the House Range for many years but the Mexican’s lost placer remains hidden to this day.

Categories: Ancient Treasure, gold, Lost Mines, placer gold, treasure | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1898..Dyea Trail…Alaska…Miners headed up the trail, backpacks and animals…..


1898 gold miners alaska

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Texas Woman Rescued After Botched Treasure Hunt…$2 Million hidden


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A Texas woman in search of buried treasure in the mountains of New Mexico was found alive Saturday after going missing in below-freezing temperatures.
Chanon Thompson, 33, of Carrollton, Texas, traveled to New Mexico’s Santa Fe National Forest Thursday in pursuit of buried treasure promised by Forrest Fenn, an 82-year-old author and antiquities dealer, police say.
Nearly seven miles into the forest, Thompson lost her way, according to police. When her boyfriend did not hear from her the next day, Friday, he called authorities to report her missing.
Using a team of search dogs, technical rescue experts and three aircraft, police found Thompson around 11 on Saturday morning, according to Chief Robert Shilling of the New Mexico State Police.
Thompson, who was not seriously injured and is now resting at home, is just one of the many pulled to the Rio Grande in a modern-day gold rush sparked by Fenn’s announcement that, three years ago, he buried a chest full of “emeralds, diamonds and rubies and sapphires,” in the mountains.
In his 2010 book, “The Thrill of the Chase,” Fenn penned a poem as a cryptic treasure map to where he had hidden the treasure.
“Begin it where warm waters halt…and take it in the canyon down…not far, but too far to walk…put in below the home of brown,” the poem read in part.
Nearly 5,000 copies of Fenn’s book have been sold in just the last three months, says the author, who was inspired to leave a legacy, in the form of the hidden treasure, after a diagnosis of cancer.
“I guarantee you, when someone finds that chest, they’re gonna be shocked,” Fenn said.
Fenn says the purpose of his book and his hidden treasure is not to make money but to inspire people to get outside and feel the thrill of the treasure chase.

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Researchers: We may have found a fabled sunstone..Used by the Vikings?


sunstone
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A rough, whitish block recovered from an Elizabethan shipwreck may be a sunstone, the fabled crystal believed by some to have helped Vikings and other medieval seafarers navigate the high seas, researchers say.
In a paper published earlier this week, a Franco-British group argued that the Alderney Crystal — a chunk of Icelandic calcite found amid a 16th century wreck at the bottom of the English Channel — worked as a kind of solar compass, allowing sailors to determine the position of the sun even when it was hidden by heavy cloud, masked by fog, or below the horizon.
That’s because of a property known as birefringence, which splits light beams in a way that can reveal the direction of their source with a high degree of accuracy. Vikings may not have grasped the physics behind the phenomenon, but that wouldn’t present a problem.
“You don’t have to understand how it works,” said Albert Le Floch, of the University in Rennes in western France. “Using it is basically easy.”
Vikings were expert navigators — using the sun, stars, mountains and even migratory whales to help guide them across the sea — but some have wondered at their ability to travel the long stretches of open water between Greenland, Iceland, and Newfoundland in modern-day Canada.
Le Floch is one of several who’ve suggested that calcite crystals were used as navigational aids for long summer days in which the sun might be hidden behind the clouds. He said the use of such crystals may have persisted into the 16th century, by which time magnetic compasses were widely used but often malfunctioned.
Le Floch noted that one Icelandic legend — the Saga of St. Olaf — appears to refer to such a crystal when it says that Olaf used a “sunstone” to verify the position of the sun on a snowy day.
But that’s it. Few other medieval references to sunstones have been found, and no such crystals have ever been recovered from Viking tombs or ships. Until the Alderney Crystal was recovered in 2002, there had been little if any hard evidence to back the theory.
Many specialists are still skeptical. Donna Heddle, the director of the Center for Nordic Studies at Scotland’s University of the Highlands and Islands, described the solar compass hypothesis as speculative.
“There’s no solid evidence that that device was used by Norse navigators,” she said Friday. “There’s never been one found in a Viking boat. One cannot help but feel that if there were such things they would be found in graves.”
She acknowledged that the crystal came from Iceland and was found near a navigation tool, but said it might just as easily have been used as a magnifying device as a solar compass.
Le Floch argued that one of the reasons why no stones have been found before is that calcite degrades quickly — it’s vulnerable to acid, sea salts, and to heat. The Alderney Crystal was originally transparent, but the sea water had turned it a milky white.
Le Floch’s paper — written with Guy Ropars, Jacques Lucas, and a group of Britons from the Alderney Maritime Trust — appeared Wednesday in the Proceedings of the Royal Society A.

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Metal Detecting spots…Ghost Towns…Iowa…Scott County


Ghost towns:

1. Roundgrove, 3 miles Southeast of New Liberty
2. Allens Grove, 2 1/2 miles Southeast of Dixon
3. Carlson, on the railroad and North County line, 5 miles North Northwest of
Long Grove
4. Martins (Gambrill), on the railroad, 5 miles East of McCausland
5. Argo, 5 miles West Southwest of Princeton
6. Green Tree, 5 miles North and 1 mile West of Davenport. Active from 1878 to
1903
OTHER SITES
1. Fejervary Park is a favorite coin shooter area in Davenport.
2. Credit Island in the Mississippi river was once a picnic grounds
3. Gold was stolen during a train robbery along the Mississippi River West of
Davenport. The amount was between $35,000 and $50,000 and was believed to be
buried in a 3 acre area just off the railroads tracks and the highway, near a
creek in the location.

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Metal Detecting spots…Ghost Towns…Utah..Weber and Rich county


Weber County:
Ghost Towns:
1. West Warren, 10 miles due West of Ogden
2. Liberty, 7 miles Northeast of Ogden
3. Unitah, at the mouth of Weber Canyon, founded in 1850. Once had over 100
stores and shops, hotels, saloons and a brewery.
4. The abandoned La Plata Silver Mine is located 5 miles Northeast of Ogden.

Rich County:
Ghost Towns:
1. Round Valley, on the South end of Bear Lake, 25 miles East of Logan.
2. Sage Creek Junction, near the State line, 35 miles due East of Logan.
3. Spanish mining activity has been found in the Wasatach Range in 1863. A
lost gold lode, discovered by Brigham Young is somewhere in Ferguson Canyon in
the Wasatach Mountains.

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Ghost Town Locations: York County, PA


1. Newberrytown, 12 1/2 miles North of York
2. Strinestown, 9 miles North of York
3. Bigdam, 2 1/2 miles Northwest of Kraltown
4. Mulberry, 2 1/2 miles South Southeast of Kraltown
5. Eastmont, 4 miles Northwest of York
6. Starview, 2 miles South of Mount Wolf
7. Saginaw, on teh Susquehanna River, 4 miles East of Manchester
8. Admire, 1 mile Southeast of Davidsburg
9. Taxville, 3 miles West of West York
10. Swam, 2 1/2 miles Northeast of Abbottstown
11. Ironore (Iron Ridge), 3 miles West Southwest of Spring Grove
12. Jacobs Mills, 4 miles West Southwest of Spring Grove
13. Gitts Run, 2 miles North Northeast of Hanover
14. Helter, 2 miles Southeast of Hanover
15. Marburg, 5 miles East Southeast of Hanover
16. Raubenstine, in far Southwest corner of county on State Line, 5 miles due South of Hanover
17. Larue, 1 1/2 miles Northwest of Glen Rock
18. Graydon, 2 miles South of Loganville
19. Camp Security, built in 1781 to house British Prisoners, 3 miles East of York
20. Long level, on the Susquehanna River, 2 miles South of Wrightsville
21. Freysville, 2 miles Northwest of Windsor
22. Bittersville, 2 1/2 miles East of Windsor
23. Cresap’s Fort, built in 1736 near Craley.
24. Rock High, 3 miles South of Brogue
25. Hopewell Center, 3 miles Southeast of Cross Roads
26. Boyle, 2 1/2 miles Northeast of Shrewsbury
27. Dolf, 2 1/2 miles Northeast of Stewartstown
28. Peach Bottom, on the Susquehanna River, 21 miles due South of Lancaster.

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Here is the poem for the Fenn Treasure that was hidden…..


Begin it where warm waters halt
And take it in the canyon down,
Not far, but too far to walk.
Put in below the home of Brown.

From there it’s no place for the meek,
The end is ever drawing nigh;
There’ll be no paddle up your creek,
Just heavy loads and water high.

If you’ve been wise and found the blaze,
Look quickly down, your quest to cease,
But tarry scant with marvel gaze,
Just take the chest and go in peace.

So why is it that I must go
And leave my trove for all to seek?
The answers I already know,
I’ve done it tired and now I’m weak.

So hear me all and listen good,
Your effort will be worth the cold.
If you are brave and in the wood
I give you title to the gold.

Categories: Lost Treasure, Strange News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Take A Walk To The “Edge of the World”


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Sunrise over the Sandia Mountains..Albuquerque, NM



Just a quick photo of the sunrise, the Sandia Mountains are over 1 mile above the Albuquerque City.

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