Posts Tagged With: medieval

Skeleton of Burnt ‘Witch Girl’ Found in Italy….


Italian archaeologists have unearthed the remains of a Medieval teenage girl who was burnt and thrown carelessly in a pit, her grave covered with heavy stone slabs.

Her burial shows she was seen as a danger even when dead, according to the archaeologists.

The skeleton was discovered at the complex of San Calocero in Albenga on the Ligurian Riviera, by a team led by scientific director Philippe Pergola, professor of topography of the Orbis Christianus Antiquus at the Pontifical Institute of Archaeology at the Vatican.

 

At the same location, in September 2014, the team unearthed the remains of another “witch girl,” a 13-year-old female who was buried face-down.

Like other deviant burials, in which the dead were buried with a brick in the mouth, nailed or staked to the ground, or even decapitated and dismembered, both the face-down burial and the stone-covered tomb aimed at preventing the dead girls from rising from the grave.

Further analysis determined the “witch girl” who was buried face-down just suffered from scurvy, a disorder caused by an insufficient intake of vitamin C.

It is unlikely the two witch girls are related. While the first girl died between the first half of 1400 and the beginning of 1500, the newly found skeleton is likely older, the archaeologists say.

“We are waiting for the radiocarbon dating results. At the moment we can date the burial between the 9th and the 15th century,” said archaeologist Stefano Roascio, the excavation director.

Standing just 4.75 feet tall, the girl was 15-17 years old when she died. She was burnt in an unknown location and then brought to the San Calocero site where she was hastily buried.

“We can’t say whether she was alive or not when she was burnt. Fire attacked her body when soft tissues were still present, so it could have occurred before death or soon after,” anthropologist Elena Dellù told Discovery News.

The girl was hurriedly interred, with only heavy stones thrown over her grave.

“She was taken by her elbows and just thrown in the pit. Her head leaned on the vertical wall of the pit, so that it was bent. Indeed, her chin almost touched the breastbone,” Dellù said.

Preliminary analysis revealed porotic hyperostosis on the skull and orbits. These are areas of spongy or porous bone tissue and are the result of severe iron deficiency anemia.

Enamel hypoplasia, a condition in which enamel becomes weak, was also present and pointed to childhood stresses such as malnutrition.

Her pallor, her possible hematomas and fainting might have scared the community.

The condition appear similar to that of the first “witch girl” who was diagnosed with scurvy on the basis of porotic hyperostosis found in crucial points. The spongy areas were present on the external surface of the occipital bone, on the orbital roofs, near the dental sockets and on the palate, and on the greater wings of the sphenoid.

“Unfortunately the skeleton of the second girl is damaged right in those bones where scurvy can be diagnosed. However, we cannot rule it out completely given theporotic hyperostosis on the skull,” Dellù said.

The excavation, which is currently funded by private foundations (Fondazione Nino Lamboglia of Rome and Fondazione bancaria De Mari of Savona) will continue in 2016.

“At the end of the digging campaign we will focus on specific analysis. If the radiocarbon dating shows the two girls are from the same period, we will try to compare their DNA,” Dellù said.

Categories: Archaeology, artifacts, Execution, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

‘Medieval knight’ unearthed in Edinburgh car park dig……


_66369221_graves
========================================================================
The remains of a medieval knight or nobleman found underneath a car park are to be moved to make way for a university building.

The grave and evidence of a 13th Century monastery were uncovered when archaeologists were called to an Edinburgh Old Town building site.

An elaborate sandstone slab, with carvings of a Calvary Cross and ornate sword, marked the grave.

As part of low carbon measures for the University of Edinburgh scheme, work was being carried out in the former car park to create a rainwater harvesting tank for the new building.

It was already known the area had been the site of the 18th Century Old High School, the 16th Century Royal High School and the 13th Century Blackfriars Monastery.

Along with the knight or nobleman’s grave and skeleton, the excavation has revealed the exact location of the monastery, which was founded in 1230 by Alexander II (King of Scotland 1214-49) and destroyed during the Protestant Reformation in 1558.

Richard Lewis, the City of Edinburgh council culture convener, said it was hoped more would be found out about the remains, but the grave had already been dated to the 13th Century.

“This find has the potential to be one of the most significant and exciting archaeological discoveries in the city for many years, providing us with yet more clues as to what life was like in Medieval Edinburgh,” he added.

The project’s archaeological services have been provided by Edinburgh-based Headland Archaeology.

The archaeologist who found the grave, Ross Murray, had studied at the University of Edinburgh on a site only yards from where the find was made.

Mr Murray said: “We obviously knew the history of the High School Yards site while we were studying here but I never imagined I would be back here to make such an incredible discovery.”

Categories: Lost Treasure, Strange News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Leeds Castle Maze……




===========================================================================
Leeds Castle, 5 miles (8 km) southeast of Maidstone, Kent, England, dates back to 1119. In 1278 the castle came into the hands of King Edward I, for whom it became a favourite residence. The castle seen today dates mostly from the 19th century and is built on islands in a lake formed by the River Len to the east of the village of Leeds.
Planted with 2,400 yew trees in 1988 and designed by architect Vernon Gibberd, in association with Minotaur Designs, the maze at Leeds Castle, near Maidstone, Kent, delights thousands of visitors each year attempting to reach the panoramic central viewing point.

The maze is designed as a topiary castle with castellated hedges forming towers and bastions. In addition, the visitor successfully reaching the centre, and ascending the spiralling path to the viewpoint, may notice that part of the maze’s plan mirrors a queen’s crown, echoing the notion of Leeds Castle as the queen’s castle.

The inspiration for the Leeds Castle maze – or labyrinth – is drawn from the earliest known example, an ancient Egyptian building near Lake Maeris, which contained twelve courts and 3,000 chambers. Featuring traditional gardening practice, the maze also depicts an age-old planting style.

To add to the maze’s mystery, the raised centre that overlooks the castle’s parkland and surrounding countryside is actually a hollow dome, which contains the entrance to a hidden underground grotto – the escape tunnel that prevents the necessity of unravelling a return journey.

In 1987, Vernon Gibberd, working with sculptor Simon Verity and shell artist Diana Reynell, designed the Leeds Castle grotto to represent The Underworld.

Descending coloured stone steps, visitors are led past the Guardians of the Sources of Water.

Crafted in the corners of the main chamber are carvings celebrating the four elements and mythical beasts. The domed ceiling is decorated with black and white swans – symbols of alchemy and Leeds Castle.

As the visitor proceeds, the designs become more macabre with bones emerging from the walls, fish flying on the ceiling, creatures walking upside down and encrusted on the walls, exotic minerals.

Behind bars, guarding the final chamber, is the squatting figure of a life-sized mythical green man – created to ward off evil spirits – holding a bronze key. Sculpted by Kent artist, Malcolm Murduck in 1999, the green man is thought to have pagan roots and symbolises the spirits of woodland and rebirth.

At the end of the tunnel the mood lightens with a shell phoenix – also a symbol of rebirth – in a guarded cave. Daylight greets the visitor, who emerges into a square hermitage formed by the retaining walls of the end steps and roofed by the bridge leading to the maze entrance above.

Categories: Strange News, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Largest Coin Treasure in Bulgaria….


The gold coins are from the 14th century while the silver ones are from the end of the 13th century.

The coins have been found dispersed in what has been used as a toilet hole with a 2-meter diameter, leading the experts to believe that they were hidden and buried during the Ottoman invasion of the area. Such treasures were usually placed in clay pots or similar vessels and then concealed, while for the latest find it is believed that the coins were put in some sort of a purse, which has decomposed over the years.

The coins were found in the central town of Perperikon, near the Citadel, in the area believed to have been the residence of the very wealthy bishops.

Ovcharov says the excavations there are continuing with expectations to discover more than 50 other gold coins.

The latest finds also include an intricate silver frame of a still-undated icon.

There is ongoing research at the two churches in the southeast area of the Acropolis while two tombs, most likely bishop ones, will be opened next week.

Ovcharov informs that the site enjoys lasting strong interest from local and foreign visitors with an increased flow of those from neighboring Romania and Turkey.

The unique Ancient Thracian city of Perperikon was first discovered in 1979 in the Eastern Rhodoppe Mountains. It is thought that the famous sanctuary and oracular shrine dedicated to Dionysus of the Bessi tribe was situated there. The ancient rock city contains remains from all archaeological periods.

Ovcharov also discovered nearby an ancient Thracian surface tomb in the village of Tatul, containing a sanctuary linked with the cult of Orpheus.

Ovcharov is nicknamed the “Bulgarian Indiana Jones” .

Categories: Lost Treasure | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

mayanexplore.com

Riviera Maya Travel Guide

Cajun Food, Louisiana History, and a Little Lagniappe

Preservation of traditional River Road cuisine, Louisiana history & architecture, and the communities between Baton Rouge & NOLA

Jali Wanders

Wondering and Wandering

Southpaw Tracks

“If ever a time should come, when vain and aspiring men shall possess the highest seats in Government, our country will stand in need of its experienced patriots to prevent its ruin.” ~Samuel Adams

Pacific Paratrooper

This WordPress.com site is Pacific War era information

what's the formula?

Nurturing awesomeness: from the parents of celebrities, heroes, trailblazers and leaders

Tarheel Red

A Voice of Conservatism Living in Carolina Blue

cancer killing recipe

Just another WordPress.com site

dreamshadow59

A great WordPress.com site

Mike's Look at Life

Photography, memoirs, random thoughts.

Belle Grove Plantation Bed and Breakfast

Birthplace of James Madison and Southern Plantation

Letters for Michael

Lessons on being gay, of love, life and lots of it

Sunny Sleevez

Sun Protection & Green Info

Backcountry Tranquility

A journal about my travels and related experiences :)

LEANNE COLE

Art and Practice

Lukas Chodorowicz

Travel, culture and lifestyle experienced on my adventures around the world. All photos taken by me. Instagram: @colorspark

BunnyandPorkBelly

life is always sweeter and yummier through a lens. bunnyandporkbelly [at] gmail [dot] com

%d bloggers like this: