Posts Tagged With: Lost Cities

Lost City….Lion City of Quiandao Lake, China


 

No doubt we’ve all heard of the legend of Atlantis, the ancient, once great city that was lost when the ocean submerged it.

To this day the legendary city has yet to be found (or proven to have ever existed) yet over the years many other underwater cities have been found, each of them as eerie as they are mind blowing.

At the foot of Wu Shi Mountain (or “Five Lion” Mountain) lies an ancient city known as Shi Cheng (“Lion City”). It was built during the Eastern Han Dynasty (AD 25 – 200) and was first set up as a county in AD 208. This city acquired the name “Shi Cheng” from nearby Wu Shi Mountain, which is located just behind the city. At present Shi Cheng remains undisturbed at a depth of 26-40m. Big Blue, a dive operator based in Shanghai,runs year-round weekend trips twice a month to Qiandao Lake and has begun exploration of this submerged city.

LC1 LC2 LC3

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Coins key to rewriting the history of Australia……


Copper coins and a 70-year-old map with an “x” may lead to a discovery that could rewrite Australia’s history.

Australian scientist Ian McIntosh, Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University in the United States, plans an expedition in July that has stirred the archaeological community.

The scientist wants to revisit the location where five coins were found in the Northern Territory in 1944 that have proven to be 1000 years old, opening up the possibility that seafarers from distant countries might have landed in Australia much earlier than believed.
In 1944 during World War II, after Japanese bombers had attacked Darwin two years earlier, the Wessel Islands – an uninhabited group of islands off Australia’s north coast – had become a strategic position to help protect the mainland.

Aussie soldier Maurie Isenberg was stationed on one of the islands to man a radar station and spent his spare time fishing on the idyllic beaches. While sitting with his fishing-rod, he discovered five coins in the sand.
He didn’t have a clue where they could have come from but pocketed them anyway and later placed them in a tin. In 1979 he rediscovered his “treasure” and decided to send the coins to a museum to get them identified. They proved to be 1000 years old.

Still not fully realising what treasure he held in his hands, he marked an old colleague’s map with an “x ” to remember where he had found them.

The coins raise many important questions: How did 1000-year-old coins end up on a remote beach on an island off the northern coast of Australia? Did explorers from distant lands arrive on Australian shores way before James Cook declared it “terra nullius” and claimed it for the British throne in 1770?

We do know already that Captain Cook wasn’t the first white seafarer to step on Australia’s shores. In 1606 a Dutch explorer named Willem Janszoon reached the Cape York Peninsula in Queensland, closely followed a few years late by another Dutch seafarer Dirk Hartog.

And the Spaniard Luiz Vaez de Torres discovered the strait between Papua New Guinea and Australia, which was later named Torres Strait in his honour.

McIntosh and his team of Australian and American historians, archaeologists, geomorphologists and Aboriginal rangers say that the five coins date back to the 900s to 1300s.

They are African coins from the former Kilwa sultanate, now a World Heritage ruin on an island off Tanzania. Kilwa was once a flourishing trade port with links to India in the 13th to 16th centuries.
The copper coins were the first coins ever produced in sub-Saharan Africa and, according to McIntosh, have only twice been found outside Africa: once in Oman and Isenberg’s find in 1944.

Archaeologists have long suspected that there may have been early maritime trading routes that linked East Africa, Arabia, India and the Spice Islands even 1000 years ago. Or the coins could have washed ashore after a shipwreck.

McIntosh wants to answer some of these mysteries during his planned expedition to the Wessel Islands in July.

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Lost Egyptian Pyramids Found?


Two possible pyramid complexes might have been found in Egypt, according to a Google Earth satellite imagery survey.

Located about 90 miles apart, the sites contain unusual grouping of mounds with intriguing features and orientations, said satellite archaeology researcher Angela Micol of Maiden, N.C.

One site in Upper Egypt, just 12 miles from the city of Abu Sidhum along the Nile, features four mounds each with a larger, triangular-shaped plateau.

The two larger mounds at this site are approximately 250 feet in width, with two smaller mounds approximately 100 feet in width.
The site complex is arranged in a very clear formation with the large mound extending a width of approximately 620 feet — almost three times the size of the Great Pyramid.

“Upon closer examination of the formation, this mound appears to have a very flat top and a curiously symmetrical triangular shape that has been heavily eroded with time,” Micol wrote in her website Google Earth Anomalies.

Intriguingly, when zooming in on the top of the triangular formation, two circular, 20-foot-wide features appear almost in the very center of the triangle.
Some 90 miles north near the Fayoum oasis, the second possible pyramid complex contains a four-sided, truncated mound that is approximately 150 feet wide.
“It has a distinct square center which is very unusual for a mound of this size and it almost seems pyramidal when seen from above,” Micol wrote.

Located just 1.5 miles south east of the ancient town of Dimai, the site also contains three smaller mounds in a very clear formation, “similar to the diagonal alignment of the Giza Plateau pyramids,” Micol stated in a press release.

“The color of the mounds is dark and similar to the material composition of Dimai’s walls which are made of mudbrick and stone,” the researcher wrote.

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