Posts Tagged With: jewelry

Some GHOST TOWNS OF ILLINOIS


 

bodie

JO DAVIESS COUNTY

1…Council Hill…near the State line on railroad, 7 miles Northeast of Galena
2…Scales Mound…near State line on railroad, 13 miles West of Warren
3…Law…near State line on railroad, 10 miles West of Warren
4…Apple River…on the State line and railroad, 5 miles West of Warren
5…Winston…on railroad, 5 miles East Southeast of Galena
6…Schapville…4 1/2 miles Northwest of Woodbine
7…Blanding…on railroad and Mississippi River, 5 miles West Northwest of Hanover.
8…Old Hanover…in the far Southwest corner ofthe county on railroad and Mississippi River, 4 1/2 miles South Southwest of present Hanover.
9…Derinda Center…5 miles Southeast of Elizabeth
10…Pleasant Valley…on the South County line and the Plum River, 5 miles South Southwest of Willow.
STEVENSON COUNTY

1…Afolkey…4 miles Northwest of Dakota
2…Damascus…4 miles West of Cedarville
3…Winneshiek…5 miles Northeast of Freeport
4…Dunbar…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles South of Freeport
5…Stevens…2 miles North of German Valley
WINNEBAGO COUNTY
1…Letham Park…on the railroad, 5 miles South of Rockton
2…Genet..on the railroad, 3 miles West of Loves Park
3…Alworth…on the railroad, 5 miles East of Seward
4…Elida…on the South County line, 4 miles South of Winnebago
BOONE COUNTY
1…Amesville…near Garden Paririe…old stage coach stop on the Old Galena/Chicago Road.
MC HENRY COUNTY
1…Lawrence…on the railroad, 3 miles Northwest of Harvard
2…Armsby…on the railroad and State line, 3 miles West of Richmond
3…Sonon Mills…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles Southeast of Richmond
4…Johnburg…2 1/2 miles Northeast of McHenry
5…Terra Cotta…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles South of McHenry
6…North Crystal lake…on the railroad, 2 miles Northeast of Crystal Lake
7…Coral…2 miles Southeast of Marengo
8…Coyne…on the railroad and South county line, 1 1/2 miles West of Huntley.
LAKE COUNTY
1…Hickory…3 miles West of Rosecrans
2…Gilmer…on the railroad, 4 miles Southwest of Mundelein
CARROLL COUNTY
1…Marcus…on the railroad by North County line, 6 miles Northwest of Savanna.
2…Barth…on the North County line, 8 miles North Northwest of Mt. Carroll
3…Palsgrove…on the North County line, 6 miles North of Mt. Carroll
4…Keltner…on the North County line, 7 1/2 miles Northwest of Lanark
5…Hickory Grove…on the railroad, 5 miles East of Savanna
6…Timbuctoo…on the railroad, 5 miles South Southeast of Savanna
7…Big Cut…on the railroad, 3 1/2 miles Southwest of Mt. Carroll
8…Ashdale…on the railroad, 3 miles West of Lanark
9…Nursery…5 miles East of Lanark

Categories: artifacts, Ghost Towns, Haunting, hidden, Metal Detecting, silver, silver coins, treasure, Treasure Hunting, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lost Treasure of Dutch Schultz


Arthur Flegenheimer, also known as Dutch Schultz, was a New York City gangster during the 1920’s and 30’s. He was born to German Jewish immigrants Emma and Herman Flegenheimer August 6, 1902. His profession, organized crime, netted him a fortune before his death October 23, 1935.

Schultz’s gang related activities included practices such as boot legging alcohol, murder and running a numbers racket. Dutch Schultz had a long criminal history and was once declared Public Enemy #1 by the FBI. Rumors abound Schultz buried millions in Phoenicia, New York, in the Catskills region shortly before his death. However, to date it hasn’t been found.

It was while Federal Prosecutor Thomas E. Dewey was pursuing him on income tax evasion charges Schultz decided to stash his money. He had seen many others incarcerated, and when they reentered society, found their former territories taken over by rival gangsters. So he gathered up his millions he had earned in ill gotten gains and buried it somewhere.

Some say his treasure was all in currency, others say it was double-eagle gold pieces, while still others describe it as a combination of cash, gold, and jewels. The value of the hoarded treasure is also at question. Some versions of the story say $5 million, while other versions claim it was $7 or even $9 million. Whatever the amount was, it was supposedly gathered into tobacco sacks, stored in either an iron box or steel suitcase and hidden away.

An Angry Schultz
An Angry Schultz

Last Dying Words

It was only upon Schultz’s death the existence of this treasure was discovered. On his deathbed, a police stenographer recorded every word Schultz uttered between bouts of fever induced delirium. Itwas mostly nonsense, but some think there may have been a few vague, veiled references to his treasure.

When Schultz’s last dying words hit the newspapers it spawned as many versions of the buried treasure as there were stories of the Dutchman himself. Even while he was dying from gunshot wounds to the colon, liver, spleen, and stomach he refused to name his associates the men who shot him, or the whereabouts of his fortune.

A Mysterious Map

Many theories about the treasure evolved, most involving Phoenicia, and a mysterious map, supposedly drawn by another mobster, Lulu Rosenkranz, in case the location should ever be forgotten.

Several story versions place the location along Route 28 between the roadway and the Esopus Creek. Others believe it’s along railroad tracks leading into Phoenicia. Perhaps the most popular version is Schultz and Lulu Rosenkranz carried a steel safe to Phoenicia on an April night in 1933 and buried it in a grove of pine trees near the Esopus, with an “X” marking the tree under which they buried it.

A more detailed version of the events was revealed by a man over 80 years old who claimed to have first-hand knowledge of the day Schultz buried his treasure. His account has the treasure being buried the fateful afternoon Schultz and his gang were ambushed at the Palace Chop House.

According to the old timer Dutch and one of his men, probably Rosenkranz, stopped for lunch at the Phoenicia Hotel, in the center of town. Around one o’clock they left in a car got in a car, and drove onto Route 214. They proceeded north along the Stony Clove Creek for about eight miles, and hid their loot beneath a skull-shaped rock known as the Devil’s Face. They were back in Phoenicia by three o’clock. From there they returned to Newark…and the rest is history.

Another Phoenicia old-timer, Mickey Simpson, remembered Schultz well. He had his own thoughts about the treasure. “Sure,” he said in 1991, “Schultz might have buried his loot by the Esopus Creek, but if he did, it’s long gone.” Simpson was obviously referring to a number of serious floods over the years. “… and surely even an iron box couldn’t have survived them all. “Personally, I wouldn’t step off this porch for it,” Simpson continued. “It’s probably somewhere at the bottom of the Ashokan Reservoir.”

There are also local stories residents like to tell such as the elderly man who used to walk along the railroad tracks digging holes. When questioned about what he was digging for, he would simply reply, “Dutch Schultz’s buried treasure.” The railroad finally made him stop.

And a Phoenicia motel operator used to let treasure hunters dig on his property. However they first had to sign a legal document promising him a split if they found anything. He soon learned he wasn’t as smart as he thought he was. A particularly resourceful treasure hunter showed up one day with a backhoe. He dug dozens of holes and left without filling them back in. The motel operator abandoned the practice.

Schultz met his end on a Wednesday evening, October 23, 1935. It happened at the Palace Chop House and Tavern in Newark, New Jersey. A group of four well dressed men made their way to a secluded private dining room in the back of the establishment…Schultz was one of the four. After ordering drinks and dinner, the men began talking business. By 10:00 pm the bar and restaurant were empty except for the four diners, a couple on the dance floor upstairs, the bartender and a few employees in the kitchen.

Two men entered, one with a shotgun and the other brandishing a pistol. The two men made their way to the dining room, and opened fire. Three men at the table were shot and wounded. The fourth, the intended “hit”, was found in the bathroom. Schultz, and his three associates were mortally wounded.

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Mexican site yields new details of sacrifice of Spaniards..cooked and eaten….


MEXICO CITY (AP) — It was one of the worst defeats in one of history’s most dramatic conquests: Only a year after Hernan Cortes landed in Mexico, hundreds of people in a Spanish-led convey were captured, sacrificed and apparently eaten.

Excavations at a site just east of Mexico City are yielding dramatic new details about that moment when two cultures clashed — and the native defenders, at least temporarily, were in control.

Faced with strange invaders accompanied by unknown animals, the inhabitants of an Aztec-allied town reacted with apparent amazement when they captured the convoy of about 15 Spaniards, 45 foot soldiers who included Cubans of African and Indian descent, women and 350 Indian allies of the Spaniards, including Mayas and other groups.

Artifacts found at the Zultepec-Tecoaque ruin site, show the inhabitants carved clay figurines of the unfamiliar races with their strange features, or forced the captives to carve them. They then symbolically decapitated the figurines.

“We have figurines of blacks, of Europeans, that were then intentionally decapitated,” said Enrique Martinez, the government archaeologist leading this year’s round of excavations at the site, where explorations began in the 1990s.

Later, those in the convoy were apparently sacrificed and eaten by the townsfolk known as Texcocanos or Acolhuas .

The convoy was comprised of people sent from Cuba in a second expedition a year after Cortes’ initial landing in 1519 and they were heading to the Aztec capital with supplies and the conquerors’ possessions. The ethnicity and gender of those in the convoy were determined from their skull features.

Some place the number of people in the group as high as 550. Cortes had been forced to leave the convoy on its own while trying to rescue his troops from an uprising in what is now Mexico City.

Members of the captured convoy were held prisoner in door-less cells, where they were fed over six months. Little by little, the town sacrificed, and apparently ate, the horses, men and women.

“The aim of the sacrifices … was to ask the gods for protection from the strange interlopers,” the National Institute of Anthropology and History said in a statement.

But pigs brought by the Spaniards for food were apparently viewed with such suspicion that they were killed whole and left uneaten. “The pigs were sacrificed and hidden in a well, but there is no evidence that they were cooked,” Martinez said.

In contrast, the skeletons of the captured Europeans were torn apart and bore cut marks indicating the meat was removed from the bones.

Some of the first European women to set foot in Mexico weren’t treated chivalrously. Along with the men, they were apparently kept in the walled-in spaces for months, with food tossed in, perhaps through small windows. A find last week indicates one woman was sacrificed in the town plaza, dismembered, and then had the skull of a 1-year-old child, who apparently was sacrificed as well, placed in her pelvis, for reasons that were probably symbolic and remain unclear.

While Spaniards later wrote accounts of the massacre that occurred in 1520, a dark year for the conquistadors, archaeologists are finding things they didn’t mention.

“The interesting part is that the historical sources (mainly Spanish chroniclers) didn’t mention the presence of women in the convoy, and here we have a large presence of women” among remains excavated so far, Martinez said.

Fifty women and about 10 children are estimated to have been in the convoy, and all were killed.

The Spaniards’ goods were, on the whole, treated indifferently. A prized and elaborate majolica plate from Europe was tossed into the wells as were the Spaniards’ jewelry and their spurs and stirrups, which were of no use to the Indians. A horse’s rib bone, however, was prized and carved into a musical instrument.

“This seems to be even more spectacular information about an important event of the Conquest … about which we have very little historical documentation,” wrote University of Florida archaeologist Susan Gillespie, who was not involved in the project. “It does add new dimensions to the acts of resistance of the indigenous people. There is the wrong-headed notion that many of them simply capitulated to the more superior European forces. But it is the victors who write the histories of war.”

The bloodiness of the brief chapter of dominance by the indigenous group is sealed in the second name of the Zultepec ruin site, Tecoaque, which means “the place where they ate them” in Nahuatl, the Aztec language.

When Cortes’ soldiers returned to the town, they found that townspeople had strung the severed heads of captured Spaniards on a wooden “skull rack” next to those of their horses, leading some to think the Indians believed that horse and rider were one beast.

When Cortes learned what happened to his followers, he dispatched a punitive expedition of troops to destroy the town, setting into motion a chain of events that actually helped preserve it.

The inhabitants tried to hide all remains of the Spaniards by tossing them in shallow wells and abandoned the town.

“They heard that he (Cortes) was coming for them, and what they did was hide everything. If they hadn’t done that, we wouldn’t have found these things,” Martinez said.

Cortes went on to conquer the Aztec capital in 1521

Categories: Archaeology, Mexico | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Parrot laughs like a super villain…


Categories: 2nd Amendment, adult radio | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

USA: RUINS OF VIKING SETTLEMENT DISCOVERED NEAR HUDSON RIVER….


USA: Ruins of Viking Settlement Discovered near Hudson River

Stony Point, NY| A team of lanscaping workers, proceeding to an excavation near the banks of the Hudson river, has discovered the archeological remains of a Norse village dating from the 9th or 10th Century AD.

The workers were digging with a mechanical shovel near the shores of Minisceongo creek, when they stumbled upon the ruins of an ancient building. A team of archaeologists linked to Columbia University, was called to the site to inspect the findings, and they rapidly identified the site as a possible Viking settlement. They proceeded to extend the excavation, and have finally discovered the remains of six buildings.

The various structures are believed to have been constructed of sod, placed over a wooden frame. Based on the associated artifacts, the buildings were variously identified as four dwellings and two workshops. The largest dwelling measured 88 by 42 feet (26.8 by 12.8 meters) and consisted of several rooms, while two of the dwellings were much smaller and were identified as living quarters for lower-status crew or slaves. The two workshops for their part, were identified as an iron smithy, containing a large forge, and a carpentry workshop.

It is unclear how many men and women lived at the site at any given time, but the archaeological evidence suggests it had the capacity of supporting between 30 to 100 individuals, and that the site was inhabited by the Norse for a relatively short period of time.

norse

During their search of the site, the archaeologists have discovered nine skeletons, who were identified as four adult males, two adult females and three children. Only one of the male warriors had been given a proper burial, being placed in a tomb with his weapon and belongings. The other skeletons showed traces of violent injuries and seemed to have been simply left on the site of their death by the killers.

Many clues discovered on the site suggest that the Vikings could have come into conflict with the indigenous people of the region. Besides the skeletons that were found, who were most likely killed in combat, the numerous remains of native American weapons found on the site suggest the colony suffered a large-scale attack by indigenous warriors.

Several artifacts were also found on the site, suggesting the inhabitants of the site who survived the attack, must have left hastily. These include a dozen of pieces of jewelry, like brooches, pins and arm-rings, mostly made of silver and walrus ivory. The archaeologists also unearthed iron pots, potteries, oil lamps, tools, a whetstone, coins, as well as a few broken weapons and pieces of armor.

arrows3

The Vikings were Germanic Norse seafarers, speaking the Old Norse language, who raided and traded from their Scandinavian homelands across wide areas of northern and central Europe, as well as European Russia, during the late 8th to late 11th centuries.

Using their advanced seafaring skills and their famous longships, they created colonies and trading posts throughout the North Atlantic islands, navigating as far as the north-eastern coast of North America. Another short-lived Viking settlement was already discovered in 1960, in present-day L’Anse aux Meadows, located in the province Newfoundland and Labrador, in Canada. The remains of butternuts found on that site, had indeed suggested that other settlements further south, because these nuts do not grow naturally north of New Brunswick.

The scientists believe that the settlement could indeed be the legendary Norse colony known as “Vinland”, mentioned in the Icelandic Sagas. Based on the idea that the name meant “wine-land”, historians had long speculated that the region contained wild grapes. Wild grapes were, indeed, still growing in many areas of the Hudson Valley when the first European settlers arrived in the region, so the archaeologists believe that this could really be the colony described in the mythological saga.

Categories: Archaeology, Lost Treasure | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Deerfield Detectors…Full line of Metal Detectors


“Authorized dealer for Whites, Garrett, Fisher, Detector Pro, Teknetics, Minelab, Sunray, Metal Detectors and Accessories.”

Free shipping on all New Metal Detectors
Special with the purchase of any New water metal detector, Fisher, Garrett, Whites, Minelab and Detector Pro. Recieve $30.00 off the price of a Titanic Water scoop

“Ask about our layaway program”.

Check Out the Inventory Reduction Sale!
Full line of Metal Detector Accessories and Equipment
ON SALE NOW…
Fisher F 75 special edition (call for special price) (retail price $1449.00)
Fisher F75 Special Edition Metal Detector with 5 & 11″ DD Search Coils Now with Boost and Cache Locating Process! Fisher’s new Black special edition F75 now goes deeper! New, more powerful, microprocessor. New, DSP code, and more! “Most folks figured the F75 was stretched to the limit and couldn’t be made to go any deeper.

http://deerfielddetectors.com/fisher-f-75-500

Categories: gold, Metal Detecting, metal detectors, silver | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

National Museums Scotland – introducing the collections….


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Brand new Minelab Etrac for sale by Treasure Seeker of Beyond Sight and Sound Radio Show..


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Folks…anyone interested in a brand new unopened Minelab Etrac…I will be putting one up for sale this weekend! You can pm me for details if interested. May also be listing a coiltek coil this weekend as well.

https://www.facebook.com/treasure.seeker.37?fref=nf

treasure.seeker.37@facebook.com

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Hitler Hates Metal Detecting Shows…video


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Dave McMahon, Ed Cropski and Ron Guinazzo..Video Metal Detecting


This is the first, Ron GuinazzoEdward Cropski and Dave McMahon ..
I’m going to try to work on more of these, and get them out there, with the help of Chicago Ron.

 

Categories: Lost Treasure, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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