Posts Tagged With: Jesse James

Lost Treasure is still out there….


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The Dalton Gang Loot

The famous Dalton Gang made history in 1892 when they attempted to rob two banks at the same time in Coffeyville, Kansas. The result was the death of four of the outlaws and four citizens, and a prison term for the only survivor, Emmett Dalton.

Less well known is the fortune in gold and silver coins allegedly buried by the outlaws on the evening before the Coffeyville attempt. The cache was estimated to be worth between $9,000 and $20,000 in 1892 values.

Before their Coffeyville robbery, the Dalton Gang held up a Missouri-Kansas-Texas train near Wagoner, Oklahoma, and another near Adair. From these robberies, they netted $10,000. A few weeks later, they walked into an El Reno, Oklahoma, bank and took $17,000.

Following these robberies, the gang members purchased new saddles and clothes. The remaining loot was carried in their saddlebags as they made their way toward Coffeyville.

On the evening of October 5, the gang arrived at Onion Creek where it joins with the Verdigris River near the Kansas-Oklahoma border. There, they set up camp. Desiring to travel as unencumbered as possible, they unloaded all of the goods from their horses. The gold and silver coins were placed in a shallow hole they dug adjacent to their campfire.

At dawn the following morning, the outlaws breakfasted, checked their firearms and ammunition, and saddled their mounts. Before leaving, Emmett told the gang members that if they became separated, they were to rendezvous at this site, where they would retrieve the coins and escape deeper into Oklahoma.

The robbery attempt was a disaster and spelled the end of the gang. All were killed, save for Emmett. He served only 15 years in prison when he was pardoned in 1907. Lawmen believed that when freed, Emmett would lead them to the buried cache. They followed him for weeks, but he stayed away from Onion Creek. He once told an interviewer that he believed the coin cache was tainted and he wanted no more to do with it.

The precise location of the Onion Creek campsite has been debated for years, but recently discovered information has narrowed the area of search. On the morning the Dalton Gang departed for Coffeyville, Mary Brown, the young daughter of a nearby rancher, was riding her horse when she heard voices near Onion Creek. Reining up her mount, she listened and heard the sounds of men eating and saddling horses. Moments later, Brown saw five horsemen riding out from under a small wooden bridge that spanned the creek and making their way toward Coffeyville.

Years later, when Brown was an adult, she heard the story of the gold and silver coins buried at the Onion Creek campsite and was determined to find them. During the time that passed since the Coffeyville Raid, however, the old bridge had been torn down, portions of the creek had changed course and the road had been relocated. Though she searched for a full day, Brown was unable to find the location where the Daltons had camped so many years earlier.

As far as anyone knows, the treasure is still there.

Belle Starr’s Lost Iron Door Cache

Belle Starr was arguably the American West’s most famous female outlaw. She was known to deal in stolen horses, and she provided sanctuary in her eastern Oklahoma home to Frank and Jesse James, the Younger Gang and other notorious banditti. Some believed that she helped plan crimes and aided her accomplices in hiding and spending money taken in bank and train robberies.

A tale that has surfaced over the years involves gang members Starr allegedly knew. They stopped a freight train bound for the Denver Mint during the mid-1880s. The train was transporting a cargo of gold ingots destined to be turned into coin.

Though the robbery went as planned, the gang feared immediate pursuit from federal agents. They decided to hide the gold in a cave in Oklahoma’s Wichita Mountains. Before riding away with the loot, gang members removed one of the iron doors from a railroad car and, using ropes, dragged the door along behind them as they made their escape on horseback.

When they arrived at the cave, the bandits stacked the gold against one wall. The iron door was placed over the entrance, wedged into position, and covered over with rock and brush. Before leaving the area, one of the outlaws hammered a railroad spike into an oak tree located 100 yards from the cave.

A short time after the robbery, railroad detectives learned of the possibility that the gold had been hidden in the Wichita Mountains. Though they hunted for weeks, they were never able to find it.

During a subsequent train robbery attempt a few months later, all of the members of the gang were killed. In 1889, Starr was murdered, a crime that has never been solved. With her death, no one remained alive who knew the exact location of what has come to be called the “Lost Iron Door Cache.”

During the first decade of the 1900s, a rancher and his young son rode into a canyon in the Wichita Mountains near Elk Mountain. Their attention was captured by the reflection of the sun from an object located on the eastern slope. On investigating, they encountered a large, rusted iron door set into a recessed portion of the canyon wall.  The son wanted to see what was on the other side of the door, but the father reminded him they had to reach their destination before nightfall. Later, the father learned the story of the Iron Door Cache. The two returned to the region, but were unsuccessful in relocating the site.

During the ensuing years, a number of ranchers, hunters and hikers have reported spotting the iron door against one wall of a remote canyon in the Wichita Mountains. On learning the story of the gold, they attempted to return to the location, but could never find it.

While traveling through a remote canyon in the Wichitas in the 1950s, a rancher decided to pause and take shade under a large oak tree. He hung his hat on a railroad spike hammered into the trunk. Familiar with the story of the gold cache and the spike, he made plans to return to the canyon and search for the treasure, but was never able to relocate the site. Later, someone cut down the oak tree for firewood.

The latest sighting of the door was in 1996. A middle-aged man making his way on foot from the small town of Cooperton to Lawton, in search of work, took a shortcut through the Wichita Mountains and spotted the iron door. Three weeks after arriving in Lawton, he learned the story of Starr’s Iron Door Cache. He purchased a few tools and set out to recover the gold. On the way, he suffered a heart attack and died.

Bill Doolin’s Gold

In spite of lore that claims Bill Doolin netted over $175,000 in robberies in Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas over the two-year period preceding his death, the outlaw lived frugally in a wood frame shack near Burden, Kansas.

In between robberies, Doolin purchased a small plot of land and a shack near Burden, 40 miles southeast of Wichita. To this place he retreated with his loot, and it was here that he buried most of it. He never told anyone about his new residence, preferring to keep it secret.

In December 1895, Doolin traveled to Eureka Springs, Arkansas. An arthritis sufferer, he often bathed in the hot springs to soothe his aches. One afternoon he was arrested by Deputy Marshal Bill Tilghman while soaking in a hot mineral bath. He was placed in the jail in Guthrie, Oklahoma, to await trial for bank robbery. Certain that he would be convicted, Doolin escaped and fled to Burden. He began making plans to move his wife and child to this location.

For days following Doolin’s escape, the Oklahoma countryside was searched for some trace of him, to no avail. One lawman, Heck Thomas, got a tip that Doolin was planning on visiting his wife and son. He learned that Doolin’s family was living in Lawton. Thomas rode to Lawton and, from hiding, watched the house where Mrs. Doolin was living.

Thomas and a posse were hiding out near the house when Doolin came walking up, leading the horse and buggy.  The outlaw spotted the lawman and reached for a rifle under the wagon seat, firing twice. Thomas shot him dead.

Doolin’s friends were aware that he buried his share of the robbery loot, but never knew where. Not until 20 years after the outlaw’s death did anyone discover his secret residence in Burden. By that time, the old shack had tumbled down, and the land was covered in weeds and brush.

Though many have searched the area for Doolin’s cache of gold and silver coins, it remains undiscovered.

Sam Bass Treasure

Following a train robbery outside of Big Springs, Nebraska, Sam Bass and other outlaws got away with 3,000 twenty-dollar gold pieces, along with jewelry and money taken from the passengers. After dividing the loot, the outlaws split up. Bass went to his hideout at Cove Hollow near Denton, Texas. Some believe he buried his booty at Cove Hollow, although others believe he just as easily could have spent the money. He soon formed a gang, robbed more stages and added to his caches.

Bass made plans to rob the Williamson County Bank in Round Rock, Texas. When the outlaws stopped at the store first to buy some tobacco, a couple of local lawmen noticed they were armed and started to talk to them. They didn’t recognize Bass. The outlaws opened fire on them, and a gunfight ensued. Badly wounded, Bass escaped.

Texas Rangers caught up with him in a nearby pasture. The outlaw died more than a day later, and with his death went the knowledge of the location of his treasure caches at Cove Hollow.

Henry Plummer’s Lost Gold

In a short span of time, the Henry Plummer gang amassed an impressive fortune in gold coins, ingots and nuggets from robbing stagecoaches, freight wagons, miners and travelers throughout Washington and Montana…at least, according to legend, since no evidence supports the claim. Some historians have made the argument that Plummer was not an outlaw, nor did he lead an organized gang. But for those who believe that Plummer was a gang leader and who also believe in the legend of his treasure, Plummer’s share has been estimated to exceed $200,000.

For a time, Plummer (and maybe his gang) lived near Sun River, 20 miles from Great Falls, Montana. Plummer apparently buried his portion of the gold near a small creek located 200 yards from the house. He never revealed the location.

On January 10, 1864, vigilantes caught up with Plummer and hanged him. In 1875, a young boy was digging in the soft ground near a stream at Sun River and found one of Plummer’s bags of coins. He returned to the area with his father, but was unable to relocate the spot. Plummer’s buried treasure, at its estimated value, would be worth several million dollars today.

Cy Skinner’s Lost Loot

Cy Skinner was among those named as a member of Henry Plummer’s gang. After Plummer was killed, Skinner loaded up the gold ingots and coins he had accumulated in the same robberies—$200,000 worth—and fled to Hell’s Gate (now Missoula), Montana. After reaching his destination, Skinner carried the gold to one of several small islands in the middle of the Clark Fork. Weeks later, a mob of men stormed Skinner’s cabin, hauled him outside and hanged him.

During the 1930s, a man named Taichert found a portion of Skinner’s gold on one of the islands. When he returned the next day to search for the rest of it, heavy rains had caused the river to rise, barring access to the island. By the time the flow receded, the islands had been altered in size and shape. Taichert was never able to find the precise spot where he had found the gold.  Skinner’s gold still rests beneath a foot or two of river deposit on one of the small islands.

Outlaw Treasure

Mexican Payroll Loot Austin, Texas

A $3 million treasure, allegedly from a Mexican payroll in 1836 stolen by the paymaster and accomplices, the loot could be buried near Shoal Creek in Texas. After burying the loot and, in turn, killing members of the party, the remaining outlaw returned to Mexico. His map to the treasure shows it was buried five feet underground, close to an oak tree with two eagle wings carved on it.

Eight men dug 40 feet of tunnel for eight months along Shoal Creek, saying they were constructing a new bridge or a large house. On April 13, 1927, according to The Rising Star Record, the workers took off with the loot:

“A box was lifted from the square cut chamber between the rocks, for the next day the workmen were gone and the blasting has ceased. Curious throngs soon found the dark tunnel and with lights discovered traces of the large wooden box that had laid beneath the dirt for more than 60 years.”

Butch Cassidy’s Loot Moffat County, Colorado
Butch Cassidy and his Wild Bunch hid out in Brown’s Hole, Colorado, to escape from lawmen. Many believe the gang’s stolen loot was tucked away here, in an outlaw paradise, for safekeeping, but then abandoned and forgotten.Along what is known as “Outlaw Trail,” Brown’s Hole was also the perfect place to hide rustled cattle and horses.

Josie Bassett, an alleged girlfriend of Cassidy’s, lived on the Bassett Ranch at Brown’s Park. Cassidy had worked there as a ranch hand. Graves along the river, Josie’s cabin and remnants of Doc Parson’s cabin, where Cassidy lived for a while, still stand today.

Lost Treasure

Lost Opata Mine South of Tucson, Arizona

About 45 miles south of Tucson, Arizona, rises what remains of Tumacacori Mission, now a national park. The 18th-century church was built by Spaniards hoping to convert the pagan Opata and Papago Indians. The missionaries hired the Indians to work in their nearby silver mines and store the yield in a giant room.

The Opata kidnapped a woman they believed was the Virgin Mary and wanted her to marry their chief. She refused, so the people sacrificed her to their gods by tying her to the silver, rubbing poison into cuts in her hands, and dancing and singing around her.

The missionaries, so dismayed by the pagan violation of their Christian teachings, had the entrance closed off, presumably sealing in the woman’s skeletal remains—and all of the silver—still waiting to be found.

Lost Dutchman Mine Apache Junction, Arizona

Rich in gold, but—some believe—cursed, the fabled Lost Dutchman gold mine generates endless stories. The treasure hunters who mysteriously go missing while looking for the gold fuel the 120-plus-year legend. Today, some wonder if the Superstition Mountains really harbor the gold or if the stories have piled upon stories to bury the truth.

Sometime after 1868, a German (not Dutch) miner named Jacob Waltz found the Peralta family mine and worked it with an associate, Jacob Weiser. Legend has it that they hid some of the gold near Weaver’s Needle, a local landmark. Details after that are unclear, according to Lost Dutchman State Park information. Either Waltz killed Weiser or Apaches killed him, leaving Waltz as the only person who knew the whereabouts of the mine.

His neighbor in Phoenix, Arizona, who took care of him before his death in 1891, and countless others have searched unsuccessfully for the gold.

Hidden Treasure

Ruggles Brothers Gold Redding, California

In 1892, the charming, young Ruggles brothers held up the stagecoach to Weaverville, California, just west of Redding, making off with the strongbox loaded with gold. Buck Montgomery, of the Hayfork Montgomery clan, was the armed escort on the stage. He shot at Charles Ruggles, who had ordered the driver to halt.

John Ruggles fired back, killing Montgomery. Thinking his brother was dead, he cached the loot somewhere nearby. Charles was alive, but some of the loot was never found. Eventually, local vigilantes lynched the Ruggles.

Jesse James’s Hidden Treasure Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma

Legend says the James Gang, in 1876, buried stolen treasure in a deep ravine east of Cache Creek in Oklahoma. Jesse James made two signs pointing to the gold: He emptied two six-shooters into a cottonwood tree, and he nailed a horseshoe into the trunk of another cottonwood tree. Then he scratched out a contract on the side of a brass bucket to bound everyone to keep the secret. Although this doesn’t seem in his character to do so, since the written oath could have been used as evidence against him, some folks believe the treasure exists.

The words on the bucket read: “This the 5th day of March, 1876, in the year of our Lord, 1876, we the undersigned do this day organize a bounty bank. We will go to the west side of the Keechi Hills which is about fifty yards from [symbol of crossed sabers]. Follow the trail line coming through the mountains just east of the lone hill where we buried the jack [burro]. His grave is east of a rock. This contract made and entered into this V day of March 1876. This gold shall belong to who signs below. Jesse James, Frank Miller, George Overton, Rub Busse, Charlie Jones, Cole Younger, Will Overton, Uncle George Payne, Frank James, Roy Baxter, Bud Dalton, and Zack Smith.”

The gold hasn’t been found, but the engraved brass bucket and simple map have been, as have the markers pointing to the treasure’s hiding spot.

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Categories: Ancient Treasure, artifacts, Civil War, gold, gold coins, gold ingots, Legends, Lost gold, Lost Treasure, Old West, Outlaws, silver, silver coins, Texas, treasure, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

KGC Billion dollar Treasure waiting to be found…..


World famous treasure hunter Floyd Mann shares with the AHRF his insights on a billion dollars worth of treasure that was scattered across the United States by A secret organization called the Knight Of The Golden Circle or KGC for short. This group of confederate sympathizers refused to accept the terms of the surrender and started making plans for the south to rise again. But they needed a great amount of money to support a 2nd civil war. So they started collecting, robbing and stealing money, gold, silver, jewelry, arms and ammunition. They buried it around the country in old mining tunnels, pits and holes that they dug. They assigned armed sentries to protect this loot from being found. But by the time they had amassed enough fortune and supplies to fund their second civil war, World War One broke out an ended their plans by uniting the country. Also, most of the KGC had died off by then anyway. But the treasures they buried, which some have estimated to be worth billions if not trillions of dollars, is the stuff that dreams are made of to treasure hunters. Floyd shares some clues as to where to look, what to look for and where to go to get more information.

Categories: Ancient Treasure, Andersonville, Confederate, gold, gold coins, KGC, Lost gold, Lost Treasure, Old West, Outlaws, silver, silver coins, treasure, Treasure Hunters, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Louisiana Treasure….Ghost Towns and Legends. Franklin, Madison and Richland Parishes…


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Franklin Parish…Louisiana
Ghost Towns.
1. Durham, North County Line, 10 miles due North of Crowville
2. Warsay, on the Bayou Macon, 5 miles NorthEast of Crowville
3. Cordill, 6 miles NorthEast of Chase
4. Como, 5 miles NorthEast of Gilbert
5. Liddieville, 7 miles West of Winnsboro by West County Line
6. Mason, 5 miles West of Fort Neccessity by West County Line
7. Hollygrove, 2 miles West of Peck
Treasure legend.
1. A man named Evans buried his life savings around the 1900’s in 2 half gallon fruit jars. It was all in $10 and $20 gold pieces. The location is somewhere on his farm, 3 miles East of Baskin.

MADISON PARISH…Louisiana
Ghost Towns
1. Reynolds, on railroad spur and North County line, 2 miles Southwest of Sondheimer.
2. Katz, on railroad spur, 4 miles Southwest of Sondheimer
3. Omega, on the Mississippi River, 6 miles North Northeast of Tallulah
4. Mulikens Bend, on the Mississippi River, 2 miles South Southeast of Omega.
5. Tendal, on railroad, 2 1/2 miles East of Waverly
6. Quebec, on railroad, 5 miles East of Waverly, old steamboat landing on the Tensas River
7. Lake One, on railroad, 7 miles East of Waverly
8. Richmond, 2 1/2 miles South of Tallulah on the junction of Brushy and Round Away Bayous. Was a prosperous trading center, burned down twice, accidently in 1859 and by Federal Troops in 1863. Only foundations remain.
9. Barnes, on railroad, 5 miles East Southeast of Tallulah
10. Thomastown, on railroad, 8 miles East Southeast of Tallulah
11. Duckport, on the Mississippi River, 2 1/2 miles North of Mound
12. Ashwood, on bank of Lake Palmyra, old river landing.
13. Old Delta, located several miles East of present day Delta, town was move when the river changed course in 1876, the old townsite later became a haven for bootleggers and robbers.
14. Coleman, 3 1/2 miles Southwest of Mound
15. Alligator Bayou, on railroad, 3 1/2 miles North Northwest of Afton
16. Quimby, on railroad and South County line, 2 miles West Southwest of Afton.
17. Trinidad, 5 miles East Northeast of Afton
18. King, on the South County line, 5 miles due East of Afton
19. Griffin, on the Mississippi River, 13 miles due East of Afton.
Treasure Legends
1. Legend puts an early 1800’s outlaw and robber in the area of the Mason Hills for hidden loot. It is a stretch of Highlands across the Mississippi River from Vicksburg, Mississippi.
2. Indian Gold and treasure was supposed to have been found by Sieur de La Salle in 1682 at the great Indian town of Taensas. The town was located somewhere below Grand Gulf and Vicksburg on the West bank of he Mississippi River.

RICHLAND PARISH…Louisiana

GHOST TOWNS
1. Tonesburg, on railroad, 3 1/2 miles North of Rayville
2. Dunn, on railroad, 3 1/2 miles West of Delhi
3. Lucknow, 5 miles South of Start
4. Burke, on railroad, 4 miles North of Archibald
5. Buckner, 4 miles West of Alto
6. Charlieville, 5 miles Southwest of Alto
7. Boughton, 8 miles South of Alto
TREASURE LEGENDS
1. The mouth of the Bayou Amulet was a trading rendezvous location. Artifacts should be found at this location.
2. A man named Bullen lived West of Delhi on Eudora Road during the Civil War, later named McLaurin farm, fearing the Federal Troops he took his life savings in gold coins and dropped them into a well. He died a few days later and the gold has yet to be recovered.
3. A famous local outlaw named Samuel Mason buried his loot and treasure near Delhi, but non has been recovered yet.
4. Frank and Jesse James had a hideout near Delhi, on the outskirts of town. Locals believe they may have buried treasure in the area. (Note: they would have left KGC symbols to help in relocating any treasure buried)

Categories: Ghost Towns, Louisiana, Treasure Legends | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

NM family says letter proves Jesse James lived to age 107….


In the realm of gun slinging outlaws, his name tops the list. Jesse James, the notorious Old West outlaw known for robbing banks and trains and killing anyone who got in his way, is alleged to have been shot by a member of his own gang on April 3, 1882. However, now 133 years after the alleged assassination, one Four Corners family is coming forward with proof that may suggest the famous outlaw lived a lot longer.

“Grandpa died August 15 at 6:45 p.m.” reads the first line of the letter, written in old-timey cursive.

Dated August 20, 1951, the missive could have been written about anyone.

“So Jesse Woodson James at age 107 went to his death still answering questions,” the second to last paragraph fully identifies the dead relative in question.

Yes, it is the famed outlaw Jesse James who is written about in this letter.  Proof, says the letter’s owners, which could re-write the history books.

“No doubt,” Patricia Brock said. She says they found the letter amongst love letters from her father to her mother. The letter is purported to be to Brock’s grandfather, Albert Connie, of Stanley, New Mexico and is from his cousin, O. Lee Howk, of Granbury, TX.

Now first let’s rewind.

Here’s what the history books say, after an illustrious career as a bank and train robber, the gang leader and all around bad guy , Jesse Woodson James was shot in the back of the head by gang member Bob Ford on April 3, 1882.

Legend says the man was after a bounty placed on James’ head. Instead of dying that day, though, this letter claims that Jesse James lived in Granbury, Texas until the age of 107.

“Wow!” laughs Brock, who claims to be James’ distant cousin, “Wow, wow!”

As incredible as it may seem, a newspaper clipping from 1966 talks about the former sheriff of Hood County Texas sharing the very same details about a man’s body he examined and found to be James. The article also includes a picture, alleged to be the aging James.

“I would have loved to [have] met him, but I understand he had 78 aliases,” Brock said.

The family tells us that they have authenticated a signature on the envelope to be that of Jesse James, probably signed before his death. The seal of the envelope also bears three symbols, allegedly used by James when he hid treasure.

“When he wrote, he printed, Jesse James did,” Brock said as to confirm the printed name on the flap.

And they have authenticated the hand writing in the letter to be that of O. Lee Howk–alias of Jesse Woodson James’ grandson, Jesse Lee James III.

“In Granbury, Texas I don’t know why anyone would go to that length,” Brock said.

Leaving this family – who claims to be distantly related to Jesse James – excited to share this proof of his long, albeit crime-ridden, life.

Full-text of the letter as seen in the pictures
[First Page]

Granbury, TX

August 20, 1951

Mr. Albert Connie

Stanley, NM

Dear cousin,

Grandpa died August 15th at 6:45 pm. For an old man age 107 past, he died his best. He would have lasted perhaps another year or so–questions, questions by the 10’s of thousands which he answered just simply shortened his life.

I’m sorry he isn’t here to answer yours too. Frank & Jesse James made dozens of trips from Alabama, Tennessee to Texas and back. We were in Nashville, Tennessee 2 weeks in 1948. Two weeks in Atlanta, 1 week at Selma, Alabama, one week at Pensacola, one week at New Orleans. In June and part of May 1948 we were at Rye & Pueblo, Colo. Not too far from the New Mexico line. Wish you could have come up.

[Second page]

We flew over NM twice in July 1948, crossed your state again on or about Nov. 1st 1948 & JJ came back across in March 1949 on the train. JJ went to Oklahoma twice in 1948, Chicago, Texas and on a hospital stretcher with a paralyzed rt. Side & a broken rt. hip. Could you or Shane done it even now let alone past 100 years of age?

Where is Stanley? I may have some work to do out there one of these days & I would like to hear your story.

So Jesse Woodson James at age 107 went to his death still answering questions-some authentic like yours.

Will you please mail the clipping of the paper you save so I can add it to JJ scrap book, please? God bless you all– Jesse was buried here Sunday among friends & kinfolks–old cowboys, etc.

Adios amigos-

O. Lee Howk

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March 30, 1860…..KGC CHAPTER FORMED NATCHEZ [MS] DAILY FREE TRADER


The K. G. C.—A Few Remarks Thereon.
A society of the K. G. C., or Knights of the Golden Circle, will be formed in this city at an early day. The originators of this mystic order were certain military characters who resided in Lexington, Kentucky—the spring of 1854 being the date of its organization. The first object of the organization was to cultivate a martial spirit among the people of the South. The second object was to have a military organization in the South fully capable of defending our social and political rights from all assaults from our enemies at home and abroad. The past history and present aspects of our political affairs seemed to demand that an organization such as the K. G. C., fully armed and equipped and officered, was absolutely necessary. The order has steadily grown until now it numbers nearly forty thousand members, who are scattered over the Southern States of the Union, and the Northern States of Mexico. No society of the kind has in this country combined such an amount of talent, resources or numbers as has this. If we understand correctly, the present object of the K. G. C., is the invasion of Mexico. It is well known, that in this distracted country a cruel war has raged with scarce an intermission, for the past ten years. The country has been weakened by these intestine feuds; agriculture, commerce and manufacture have languished and the Mexican people have groaned under the oppression and tyranny of rival chieftains. At the present time there are two parties in Mexico, contending for the supremacy of the government. On the one hand stands the church party, with Miramon as their leader. On the other hand stands the liberal party, with Juarez as their leader. Our Minister to Mexico, Mr. McLane, has recently made a treaty with Juarez, which will be one of vast benefit to our government. Our government has already recognized the Liberal party as being the government of Mexico. The K. G. C.’s have already espoused the cause of the Liberals, and we are informed that it is their fixed determination to place it at the head of the Mexican Government, and thus aid them in restoring peace and harmony to a distracted country and an oppressed people. Our citizens will be addressed shortly on the subject of armed intervention in the affairs of Mexico, by one of the most distinguished of the “Knights of the Golden Circle,” when we hope to see a large turn out. We speak what we know, or, as Hamlet would say, “by the Card,” on this subject. The statements we have made in this connection have been derived from parties who are perfectly reliable and who are entitled to respectful consideration. Long live the K. G. C.’s—Vicksburg Sun.

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March 21, 1860….K.G.C. Meeting LOUISIANA DEMOCRAT [ALEXANDRIA, LA]


Secret organizations seem to be the order of the times:

The K. G. C.
We observe a call for the K. G. C.’s to meet at the hall over the Carrollton R. R. Depot, on this evening, at 7 o’clock. In conjunction with this call we observe that many of the leading members of this organization are now in our city. Gen. Bickley, the Commander-in-Chief, Col. Temple and Surgeon Semple, are at the St. Louis Hotel; Gen. Greer, who is well-known as one of our bravest Volunteer Colonels from Mississippi during the recent war, and who now commands a division of the K. G. C., together with Major Richardson, one of his staff-officers, and Col. H. C. Young, of Memphis, who commands the First Tennessee Regiment are at the City Hotel; while others, as Captain Scott and Lieutenant Breese, are at the Merchants’; Captain Gay, the wagon-master, is at the “Texas Home;” and still many others of note and character are at the St. Charles, or quartered with private friends in the city. Besides, there are hundreds of our own citizens in hourly contact with these gentlemen, so that one cannot but inquire, “What’s in the wind?”

As our readers must feel some interest in whatever is likely to create excitement we feel ourselves justified in making the following statement respecting this powerful organization, from sources of information, which, from the character of the parties from whom we have derived it, we deem worthy of respectful consideration. The K. G. C., or “Knights of the Golden Circle,” was organized in 1854, more to cultivate the martial spirit of our people, than anything else; since then it has steadily grown, until now it numbers over 30,000 members, who are scattered over the Southern States, and holding within its charmed circle many of our most influential men and best soldiers. No organization of the kind has in this country ever combined so much talent with such immense financial resources, and under the present aspect of political affairs, we do not deem it too much to say that the whole nation may soon become deeply interested in the ultimate labors of the K. G. C.

It is generally understood that the K. G. C. are preparing to operate in the broad field which civil war has opened in Mexico to American enterprise and industry, and the first thought of the great public is that it is to be a grand “filibuster” operation, destined to meet the same reverses which have befallen all similar expeditions. But, for our part, if our information in the main be correct, the gentlemen who stand at the head of the movement are of an entirely different intellectual calibre from those whom we have heretofore seen directing these military operations. If we were allowed to guess, we should say that these gentlemen are about embarking in a scheme not unlike that in which Lafayette, Kosciusco, DeKalb, and their compatriots so generously engaged in when we were striving to shake off the shackles of British despotism; and we are assured that it is their steady determination to place the “Liberal” or Juarez party in the full and peaceful occupation of the City of Mexico, and thus prove to the world that Americans will never refuse to other struggling peoples the aid so opportunely rendered us by the French in 1777. This noble work is one that we have frequently advocated, and the necessity of which is truly felt by the masses in this country, as well as of the Republic of Mexico. We say God speed to the K. G. C.! Should they fail, they will have fallen in a noble cause.

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Jesse James’s Pistol……


JessieJamesgun1

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The Detecting Corner…Sunday 7:00PM Eastern Time


THE DETECTING CORNER WITH KENNY BRIGGS AND ED CROPSKI.

Kenny and Ed will be discussing the various types of metal detectors, how to use them, what you can find and much more. Callers can ask questions and get answers from two of the foremost people in the detecting hobby…over 60 years of combined experience will be at your finger tips to help you with the greatest hobby in the world.

Click the link below for how to join in and listen or call into the Radio show.

http://thedetectinglifestyle.com/

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Letter to the Leavenworth Times by Jesse James….August 31, 1876


The link below will take you to the Leavenworth Weekly times…far right hand side, starting at the top of the page is a letter from Jesse James…pretty interesting to read.
You can increase the size of the print and scroll with your mouse to read the entire article.

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84027691/1876-08-31/ed-1/seq-1/;words=James+Jesse?date1=1876&rows=20&searchType=basic&state=&date2=1876&proxtext=Jesse+James&y=11&x=17&dateFilterType=yearRange&index=0

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Civil War…John Jarrette



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John Jarrette joined William Clarke Quantrill’s guerrillas in October 1861. He was with Quantrill during the raid on Lawrence, Kansas, on August 21, 1863, and with William Anderson during the massacre at Centralia, Missouri, on September 27, 1864. After the war, Jarrette joined the Jesse James gang, and was a suspect in the robbery of the bank at Russellville, Kentucky, on March 21, 1868.

In this photograph, Jarrette sports a captured Union waistbelt plate.

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