Posts Tagged With: japan

Forbidden Photos Reveal What Life In Hawaii Was Like After Pearl Harbor….


It’s no secret that the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor, which killed more than 2,000 Americans, changed the course of history for the United States and the rest of the world.

But it also dramatically altered the identity of the island paradise of Hawaii, changing everyday life for the people who lived there and bringing tourism, one of the islands’ most important industries, to a halt.

PHOTO 12 VIA GETTY IMAGES
The West Virginia and Tennessee battleships are ablaze after the Pearl Harbor attack Dec. 7, 1941.

Hours after the attack, Hawaii, a U.S. territory at the time, was placed under martial law, and all of the islands’ residents were under the dictatorship of the U.S. military, according to Honolulu Bishop Museum historian DeSoto Brown.

Since Japanese-Americans made up 37 percent of Hawaii’s population, it was impossible for the military to incarcerate all of them, Brown told The Huffington Post. Instead, all residents of Hawaii — white, Native Hawaiian, Japanese, Filipino, Chinese — were forced to live under strict military rule.

“Everybody was under martial law and treated equally unfairly because the military couldn’t target just the Japanese, who were so important to the economy,” Brown said.

After all, Japanese-American residents had long-established themselves in Hawaii as business owners, teachers and community leaders. Without them, Brown added, Hawaii’s economy would have collapsed.

BETTMANN VIA GETTY IMAGES
A newspaper photo shows two Japanese-American workers at an emergency medical unit in Honolulu, with the caption saying they are “typical of the loyal Japanese-Americans in the Islands; they have been on continuous duty since the attack on December 7.”

Under martial law, life in Hawaii became dramatically restricted, according to Brown. Immediately after the attack, civilians were mandated by the military to dig holes for makeshift bomb shelters and were ordered to place barbed wire around everything, including beaches, water pumping stations, electrical installations and government buildings.

While they were free to live their normal lives during the day, Hawaii residents were forced to black out their windows, and a curfew banned civilians from being outside at night.

All electricity was required to be shut off after sundown, and the military enforced the curfew every night. Any unauthorized civilian out after hours faced the risk of being shot. If civilians were permitted to drive after-hours for official purposes, they were required to paint their cars’ headlights black.

Food on the island was rationed to families. There was a ban on liquor, and bars were shuttered. Waikiki’s iconic beachfront hotels, once thriving with tourists and affluent locals, were closed to the public and taken over by the military.

The military even banned Hawaii civilians from taking photographs of any of the islands’ coastlines (to prevent the Japanese from finding points of entries) and anything with war- or military-related imagery. As a result, officials reviewed and confiscated any photographs that contained barbed wire, beaches or military bases.

BISHOP MUSEUM/DESOTO BROWN
Barbed wire was installed at Waikiki Beach and other coastlines across Hawaii after the 1941 attacks on Pearl Harbor.

The harsh military rule in Hawaii ended nearly three years after the Pearl Harbor attacks, but, according to Brown, the islands were forever changed.

The poor treatment of the residents in Hawaii fueled the case for bringing the islands into statehood. And the military continued to maintain a stronghold in Hawaii, with every branch of the military stationed there today.

As a historian specializing in World War II and the attacks on Pearl Harbor, Brown has collected many of the contraband images that were photographed in Hawaii despite martial law.

Many of these images are on display at the Bishop Museum in Honolulu for the 75th anniversary of the devastating attacks.

Below, see the forbidden photos and other World War II memorabilia that reveal what life in Hawaii was like for those who lived through that day “which will live in infamy,” Dec. 7, 1941.

  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    A curfew was imposed by the military government on all civilians in Hawaii, which lasted for nearly the entire war. Without some sort of curfew pass like this one, citizens could be arrested after curfew.
  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    A printed schedule for Hawaii’s very strict nightly blackout, which began Dec. 7, 1941, and was gradually eased until it was eliminated in 1944.
  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    A blacked-out restaurant in downtown Honolulu, 1942.
  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    Pins like these showed a commitment to winning the war, but they also provided manufacturers some quick income.
  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    The patriotic slogan “Remember Pearl Harbor” was widely printed in the early war years. This sticker uses a snake to symbolize the treacherous sneak attack on Dec. 7, 1941.
  • National Archives
    Barbed wire along the front of the Royal Hawaiian Hotel in Waikiki, taken over by the U.S. Navy and used throughout the war only for military personnel.
  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    During World War II, Waikiki’s luxury Royal Hawaiian Hotel was seized by the Navy and was open only to military personnel, seen here in the hotel’s Coconut Grove.
  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    Gas masks were issued to all Hawaii civilians over the age of 7, and practices like this one were held to prepare for poison gas attacks or air raids.
  • DeSoto Brown Collection
    Every citizen of the Hawaiian Islands was required to be fingerprinted and issued an official ID card like this one. Under martial law, this card had to be carried at all times.
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Remembering the last of the original Navajo Code Talkers……


Marine veteran Michael Smith wept Wednesday when he heard about the death of Chester Nez, the last of the original Navajo Code Talkers.

Smith, from Window Rock, who had met Nez several times, described him as a “quiet, humble” Navajo Marine.

Smith said that the passing of Nez — the last of the first 29 Navajo men who created a code from their language that stumped the Japanese in World War II — marked the closure of a chapter in the story of a special group of veterans.

Nez died Wednesday morning in Albuquerque, where he lived with his son Michael. He was 93. His family said he died of kidney failure.

http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/arizona/2014/06/04/arizona-navajo-code-talker-dies-nez/9965201/

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Minor tsunami hits northeastern Japan after strong quake


A minor tsunami hit Miyagi prefecture in Japan early Saturday after a strong 6.8-magnitude quake jolted the country’s northeastern Pacific coast, prompting advisories for regions including around the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant.

A tsunami of 20 centimetres was observed at 5.12 am (2012 GMT Friday) in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture, the Japan Meteorological Agency said.

The agency had issued a tsunami advisory for Miyagi as well as neighbouring Fukushima and Iwate prefectures, warning that a wave of up to one metre (3.3 feet) could impact their Pacific coastlines after the quake.

Large areas of the coastline covered by the advisory are still recovering from the 2011 quake and tsunami disaster that killed more than 18,000 people and triggered a meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

Plant operators Tokyo Electric Power (TEPCO) said there were no immediate reports of abnormality after Saturday’s quake.

“We have not seen any damage or any change in radiation gauges after the quake,” said TEPCO spokesman Masahiro Asaoka.

“Today’s operation has yet to start but we ordered workers to evacuate to high places,” Asaoka said.

The meteorological agency advised people to leave the coast immediately, while Japan’s public broadcaster NHK said some local authorities had issued evacuation advisories to their residents.

Kyodo said the city of Iwate had issued an evacuation advisory.

The United States Geological Survey said the quake struck around 129 kilometres (79 miles) east south-east of the city of Namie, an estimated 284 kilometres (176 miles) east north-east of the capital Tokyo, at 4.22 am local time (1922 GMT Friday).

The Fukushima plant’s cooling systems were swamped by the 2011 tsunami, sparking reactor meltdowns and radiation leaks in the worst atomic crisis in a generation.

Tens of thousands of people were evacuated from around the plant, with decommissioning of the site expected to take decades.

The utility is struggling to handle a huge — and growing — volume of contaminated water.

On Friday, the crippled plant was skirted by tropical storm Neoguri. Workers had scrambled to insulate the plant from any storm damage, but Neoguri had little impact on the site as it headed out into the Pacific.

Japan is situated at the conjuncture of several tectonic plates and experiences a number of relatively violent quakes every year.

But thanks to strict building codes, even powerful quakes that might wreak havoc in other countries frequently pass without causing much damage.

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A final reunion for vets of WWII Doolittle raid…..


For Jimmy Doolittle’s co-pilot, taking off from an aircraft carrier, flying hundreds of miles and bombing Japan was the easy part of the daring 1942 American air raid on Tokyo.

The worst moment came hours later, when he had to parachute out of his B-25 bomber over China in the middle of a heavy storm.

“That was the scariest time,” said Richard Cole, now 98 years old.

“There you are in an airplane over a land you are not familiar with, under a big weather front, very active with lots of rain, with thunderstorms and lots of lightning and you are going to jump out,” he said.

“There are lots of questions that are going through your mind.”

Out of the 80 men who took part in the storied Doolittle raid that boosted America’s morale in the early days of World War II, only four are still alive.

Cole and two of his fellow veterans, also in their nineties, attended a “final reunion” Saturday at the US Air Force’s National Museum in Dayton, Ohio.

In a ceremony webcast live and attended by family and dignitaries, the three elderly men toasted comrades who have died since the raid, as well as the five airmen who perished in the operation.

“Gentlemen, I propose a toast to those we lost on the mission, and those who have passed away since: thank you very much and may they rest in peace,” Cole said, as he and his fellow veterans raised goblets of cognac.

The Doolittle crews “inspired a nation,” Air Force chief General Mark Welsh told the veterans, and “you turned the tide of a war.”

The raid has been immortalized on screen and in numerous books, but Cole said he never expected the operation would take on so much importance.

“I never dreamed this thing would last so long and that so many people would be interested in it,” he said in a telephone interview with AFP.

The bold operation was led by Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy Doolittle, who became an American hero after 16 B-25 bombers under his command struck Tokyo five months after the Japanese decimated the US Navy at Pearl Harbor.

When he volunteered for the top-secret mission, Cole knew it would be dangerous but he only learned of the target aboard the carrier USS Hornet in the Pacific Ocean.

Once the crews were told they would be attacking Japan, there was “a lot of jubilation,” he said. “But then it became kind of quiet because people were realizing what they were going to be doing.”

The assault was close to a suicide mission.

The plan called for the aircraft — which had never seen combat — to fly over Japan with no fighter escorts and then head towards eastern China, where homing beacons would supposedly guide them in for a landing.

After their carrier was spotted by a Japanese vessel, Doolittle decided to launch the raid immediately, 10 hours earlier than scheduled and 650 nautical miles (1,200 kilometers) from Japan.

The aircraft took off on April 18, and arrived over Japan six hours later, achieving total surprise.

“We were not jumped by any kind of a fighter or other airplane,” Cole said. “We went across at Japan at low altitude. We could see planes above us and apparently they couldn’t see us.”

After a bombing run that lasted only a few minutes, the B-25s got “the heck out of there.”

As they flew toward China, the navigator passed a note up to the cold, noisy cockpit. They would run out of fuel 180 miles (290 kilometers) short of their destination, the note said, meaning the plane would have to be ditched at sea.

A strong tail wind, however, “pushed us all the way to China,” Cole said.

They arrived on the coast at dusk, but a planned homing signal to help them land never appeared.

So they flew until their fuel tanks were empty and parachuted out.

Cole’s chute got caught in a tree. In darkness and pouring rain, he opted to stay atop the tree until daylight.

“After that, I climbed down and started walking west with my compass.

“And after walking all day, I came on to a paramilitary compound and was taken in by the Chinese, who were very helpful.”

He and his crewmates were eventually reunited and flown out on a US aircraft. But all the B-25s were lost in the raid, and Doolittle worried he would be court-martialed.

Although the bombing caused only modest damage in Tokyo and elsewhere, the attack’s psychological effect — in Japan and the United States — was dramatic.

Americans felt they had scored a counter-punch, and an embarrassed Japan soon launched an unsuccessful naval attack at the Midway Atoll that proved a turning point in the war.

It would be more than two years before US aircraft bombed Japan again.doo

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Oregon’s Next Huge Earthquake: Not If, But When….


The clock is ticking on the next big earthquake in the Pacific Northwest, and experts fear it will be a monster

 

Following the deadly magnitude-9.0 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan in March 2011, Oregon legislators commissioned a study of the impact a similar quake could have on the state, according to the Associated Press.
The report, “Oregon Resilience Plan: Reducing Risk and Improving Recovery for the Next Cascadia Earthquake and Tsunami,” was presented to legislators Thursday (March 14).
Within its pages is a chilling picture of death and destruction that would cripple the entire Pacific Northwest, from Northern California to British Columbia.
More than 10,000 people led. Bridges, dams, roadways and buildings — including Oregon’s State Capitol in Eugene — in a state of utter collapse. No water, electricity, natural gas, heat, telephokilne service or gasoline — in some cases, for months. Economic losses in excess of $30 billion.

The seismically active region has felt temblors before, most notably a massive earthquake and tsunami in January 1700 that wiped out entire forests in what is now Oregon and Washington and caused a deadly tsunami in Japan, thousands of miles across the Pacific Ocean. [Waves of Destruction: History’s Biggest Tsunamis]
“This earthquake will hit us again,” Kent Yu, chair of the commission that developed the report, told Oregon legislators, according to the Daily Mail. “It’s just a matter of how soon.”
That titanic 1700 shaker was a megathrust earthquake on the Cascadia Fault, a seismic zone that stretches for almost 700 miles (1,100 kilometers) just off the Pacific Northwest coast. Based on current understanding of the fault’s seismic history, scientists estimate quakes occur along the line roughly every 240 years.
In other words, another big Cascadia Fault earthquake is “long overdue,” the International Science Times reports.
The report also noted that, geologically speaking, Japan and Oregon are mirror images of each other. There is, however, one important difference: Japan is much more prepared for earthquakes.
And Oregon is hardly the only region of North America overdue for a large earthquake: The Lake Tahoe region on the California-Nevada border is home to the West Tahoe Fault, which generally sees a quake every 3,000 to 4,000 years, and the most recent temblor occurred 4,500 years ago.
Elsewhere in California, the southern San Andreas Fault last produced a big temblor in 1690, and has been relatively quiet ever since. That isn’t good news, since a major earthquake usually occurs there every 180 years, according to recent research, and the fault line now has more than 300 years of pressure built up.
Whereas the West Coast is usually considered the most seismically active region of North America, the East Coast also has earthquakes, just not as often. Fault lines have recently been discovered near New York City, and the Indian Point nuclear power plant, about 24 miles (39 km) north of the city, straddles the previously unidentified intersection of two active seismic zones.
In virtually all of these regions, preparation for earthquakes has been woefully inadequate, say many experts. Maree Wacker, chief executive officer of the American Red Cross of Oregon, laments the state of readiness: “Oregonians as individuals are underprepared,” Wacker told the Daily Mail.

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Sweden finds WWII Soviet submarine wreck in Baltic Sea……


article-2249510-168EEF5D000005DC-435_634x396
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The wreck of a Soviet submarine lost during World War Two has been found in the Baltic Sea, 71 years after it sank, the Swedish Military said on Monday.
The Swedish Armed Forces said the submarine, believed to have been lost on patrol in late 1941, was found in the Swedish economic zone southeast of the Baltic island of Oland in an area which German forces had mined during the war.
“There is much to indicate that the submarine headed straight into the minefield while on the surface and was blown apart by a mine,” the military said in a statement.
On its website the military posted a video and still images of the wreckage, which had broken into two large sections.
The wreck was first reported by civilian divers during the summer months in the middle of this year. Swedish submarine salvage ship HMS Belos in the following months confirmed the find and photographed it, the military said.
Swedish authorities had informed Russia of the find in order to give family members and the Russian navy the opportunity to conduct a memorial ceremony at the site, the military added.
Several Soviet submarines sunk during World War Two have been found in Swedish waters over the years, it added.

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Pearl Harbor…Dec 7th, 1941…Will History repeat and once again we suffer….


battleships-aflame-on-battleship-row-alongside-ford-island

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$4.2 million for Christmas tree? This one’s made of gold, and Disney characters….



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– For those seeking a glow to their Christmas this year, a jewelry store in downtown Tokyo has just the answer: a pure gold revolving “tree” covered in Disney characters such as Mickey Mouse, Tinker Bell and Cinderella.
The tree-like ornament is made of 88 pounds of pure gold, standing nearly 8 feet high and 3 feet in diameter. It is decorated with pure gold-plate silhouette cutouts of 50 popular Disney characters and draped with ribbons made of gold leaf.
The price tag? A mere 350 million yen ($4.2 million).

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Before the Atomic bomb there were “Bat” bombs…



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In World War II, the U.S. Marine Corps worked on a project to train bats as kamikaze bombers against the Japanese. A Pennsylvania dentist, Lytle Adams, first proposed the idea to the White House in 1942, after visiting the bat-filled caves at Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico. Adams proposed strapping tiny incendiary explosives to the animals and exploiting their use of echolocation to find roosts in barns and attics. According to Lytle’s plan, the bomb-strapped bats would fly to Japan, nestle in the nooks of the mostly wooden buildings in Japanese cities, and set them ablaze.
The Marine Corps captured thousands of Mexican free-tailed bats and developed explosive devices to strap to their backs. The project was scrapped in 1943, probably because the U.S. government had made progress on the atomic bomb.

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New malware sends your friends death threats through your email account…


If your sweet old grandmother sends you an email threatening to slit your throat, don’t worry: It’s just the malware talking. NBC’s TechNewsDaily reports that there’s a new strain of malware going around in Japan that takes control of users’ email accounts and uses them to send out death threats to a variety of targets. In fact, the malware is apparently so convincing that three people in Japan so far have been arrested because their email accounts have sent out death threats they didn’t write.
Among other things, Japanese authorities have seen the malware send out an email that “threatened to kill en masse at a shopping center,” “an email sent to an airline” that “threatened to bomb a plane” and an email sent to a “school attended by a member of the Japanese royal family” that “threatened harm against the kindergarten class.”
While this is all horrible, Symantec says that the malware’s “infection appears to be very limited at this time and the broader population of Internet users should be not affected.” Symantec also says that its own Insight reputation-screening software was capable of protecting its users from the malicious code.

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