Posts Tagged With: google

‘100 MILLION CITIZENS’ JOIN NSA-SLAYER’S FIGHT…..


Class-action filing follows ruling against spy-on-Americans program.

A new class-action claim against President Obama and the National Security Agency’s spying on Americans could end up with 100 million or more plaintiffs, according to lawyer Larry Klayman, who earlier won a judgment in federal court that the NSA program likely is unconstitutional.

Klayman, founder of FreedomWatch, is fighting the NSA’s telephone-call tracking program in federal court in Washington, where a judge ruled the government’s actions are “almost Orwellian.”

He announced late Thursday that the new case was filed to streamline work on the earlier cases, which are pending before Judge Richard J. Leon.

Klayman has filed a petition for review that would allow the cases to leapfrog intermediate courts and go directly to the U.S. Supreme Court to determine whether the massive and indiscriminate collection of data by the federal government violates the Fourth Amendment.

Klayman explained that plaintiffs removed the class-action demand in the earlier cases and dropped the Verizon defendants, with the right to add them later, to move the cases more quickly to the discovery phase.

The original cases are now simplified to speed up the litigation, while the new class action can potentially involve millions of Americans as plaintiffs.

The filing explains that the class “is so numerous that the individual joinder of all members, in this or any action is impracticable. The exact number or identification of class members is presently unknown to plaintiffs, but it is believed that the class numbers over a hundred million citizens.”

“The ongoing outrageous violation of constitutional rights should be adjudicated as fully and swiftly as possible, while allowing all aggrieved citizens to bring suit. The government defendants, including the president, must be held accountable and these violations of constitutional rights must be brought to an end. As for Verizon and the other cell phone and Internet providers who claim that they have no liability as they were acting under orders of the FISC or Justice Department, discovery in the on-going cases will test whether this is true. If not, they will be added to the cases at a later date.”

Obama held a news conference recently to announce he wants to enable the NSA to continue reviewing telephone-call metadata “when we need” but to no longer hold the information.

In response, Klayman charged the president was “spewing smoke … to make himself look good.”

“If you believe he was serious about investigating the IRS, investigating Benghazi, telling the truth about Obamacare … then you can believe what he said today. He doesn’t mean it,” Klayman told WND.

Obama said he wants to have intelligence agencies get permission from a secret court before using the telephone data. He also said he wants to cut back on eavesdropping on the leaders of foreign allies, which has ignited a diplomatic firestorm.

But Obama stood behind the NSA’s activities, calling them necessary for national security. He failed, however, to address several recommendations from a review panel that looked at surveillance issues. The panel recommended that the NSA “not in any way subvert, undermine, weaken or make vulnerable” commercial software and that it discontinue exploiting flaws in software.

Klayman has urged the district court to move forward quickly on the dispute, citing an earlier warning from the court itself.

The court said: “We work 24/7 around this courthouse, my friend. 24/7. I don’t want to hear anything about vacations, weddings, days off. Forget about it. This is a case at the pinnacle of public national interest, pinnacle. All hands 24/7. No excuses. You got a team of lawyers; Mr. Klayman is alone apparently. You have litigated cases in this courthouse when it is matters of this consequence and enormity. You know how this court operates.”

The new case lists Klayman, Charles and Mary Ann Strange, Michael Ferrari and Matt Garrison as plaintiffs. Defendants include Obama, Attorney General Eric Holder, NSA chief Keith Alexander, Roger Vinson of the U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, National Intelligence Director James Clapper, CIA chief John Brennan, FBI Director James Comey, the NSA, the Department of Justice and the CIA.

It alleges the government’s spy programs are collecting records “of all communications companies including Google, Yahoo, Facebook, PalTalk, YouTube, Skype, AOL, and Apple, Verizon, AT&T, and Sprint.”

“Moreover, the government has acknowledged that it is collecting’ metadata’ about every phone call made or received by residents of the United States, and these records provide intricate details, including the identity of the individual who was spoken to, the length of time of the conversation, and where the conversation too place,” the new claim explains.

“It gives the government a comprehensive record of an individual’s associations, speech, and public movements while revealing personal details about an individual’s familial, political, professional, religious, and intimate associations.”

It alleges the defendants have set up procedures to obtain “the communication records of over 100 million U.S. citizens … regardless of whether there is reasonable suspicion or any ‘probable cause’ of any wrongdoing.”

Washington’s “schemes” have “subjected untold number of innocent people to the constant surveillance of government agents” and have not been stopped.

“Defendants have not issued substantive and meaningful explanations to the American people describing what has occurred. Rather, on information and belief, the NSA, under the authorization of President Obama, continues to engage in a systematic of warrantless eavesdropping upon phone and email communications of hundreds of millions of individuals.”

Klayman also charged he was put under surveillance by the agency when he filed the case.

Klayman, a WND commentary contributor and founder of Judicial Watch and, more recently, FreedomWatch, told WND that once his allegations that the federal government was violating the Constitution with its “watch-every-call” strategy hit the courts, he noticed problems with his email.

“People began receiving from me emails that I had never sent,” Klayman told WND at the time, suggesting harassment in response to his work. “The government just wanted me to know they were watching me.”

Klayman brought the case on behalf of Charles Strange, the father of Michael Strange, a cryptologist technician for the NSA and a support personnel member of Navy SEAL Team 6.

Michael Strange was killed in Afghanistan in 2011 when his helicopter was shot down.

Charles Strange, as a subscriber of Verizon Wireless, brought the original case against the NSA, Department of Justice and several U.S. officials, including President Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder.

The complaint alleged the government, with the participation of private telephone companies, has been conducting “a secret and illegal government scheme to intercept and analyze vast quantities of domestic telephonic communications.”

nsa_eye

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Web giants get broader surveillance revelations……


Facebook and Microsoft Corp. representatives said Friday night that after negotiations with national security officials their companies have been given permission to make new but still very limited revelations about government orders to turn over user data.
The announcements come at the end of a week when Facebook, Microsoft and Google, normally rivals, had jointly pressured the Obama administration to loosen their legal gag on national security orders.
Those actions came after Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old American who works as a contract employee at the National Security Agency, revealed to The Guardian newspaper the existence of secret surveillance programs that gathered Americans’ phone records and other data. The companies did not link their actions to Snowden’s leaks.
Ted Ullyot, Facebook’s general counsel, said in a statement that Facebook is only allowed to talk about total numbers and must give no specifics. But he said the permission it has received is still unprecedented, and the company was lobbying to reveal more.
Using the new guidelines, Ullyot said Facebook received between 9,000 and 10,000 government requests from all government entities from local to federal in the last six months of 2012, on topics including missing children investigations, fugitive tracking and terrorist threats. The requests involved the accounts of between 18,000 and 19,000 Facebook users.
The companies were not allowed to make public how many orders they received from a particular agency or on a particular subject. But the numbers do include all national security related requests including those submitted via national security letters and under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, or FISA, which companies had not previously been allowed to reveal.
The companies remain barred from revealing whether they’ve actually received FISA requests, and can only say that any they’ve received are included in the total reported figures.
Microsoft released similar numbers for the same period, but downplayed how much they revealed.
“We continue to believe that what we are permitted to publish continues to fall short of what is needed to help the community understand and debate these issues,” John Frank, Microsoft’s vice president and deputy general counsel said in a statement.
Frank said Microsoft received between 6,000 and 7,000 criminal and national security warrants, subpoenas and orders affecting between 31,000 and 32,000 accounts.
Both attorneys emphasized in their statements that those affected by the orders represent a “tiny fraction” of their huge user bases.
Google did not release its own numbers, saying late Friday that it was waiting to be able to reveal more specific and meaningful information.
“We have always believed that it’s important to differentiate between different types of government requests,” Google said in a statement. “We already publish criminal requests separately from national security letters. Lumping the two categories together would be a step back for users. Our request to the government is clear: to be able to publish aggregate numbers of national security requests, including FISA disclosures, separately.”
Facebook repeated recent assurances that the company scrutinizes every government request, and works aggressively to protect users’ data. Facebook said it has a compliance rate of 79 percent on government requests.
“We frequently reject such requests outright, or require the government to substantially scale down its requests, or simply give the government much less data than it has requested,” Ullyot said.” And we respond only as required by law.”

Categories: Politics, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Slash Your Cell Phone Bill: Make Free Calls On Your Smart Phone


Your smartphone costs a fortune in monthly fees. But there are new ways to get unlimited voice calling and significantly decrease the number of cell voice minutes you need. So pull out your smartphone, and we’ll fire up a few tools to potentially save you hundreds of dollars on your cell phone bill this year.
Wi-Fi Calling on Cell Phones Explained
Your cell phone can communicate in four distinct ways: voice calls, texts, data over cell networks, and data over Wi-Fi. What many people don’t realize is that connecting via Wi-Fi doesn’t count at all against your cell phone bill. So how can you exploit this loophole to cut down on your overall cell phone bill?
Making voice calls on you computer over the Internet is nothing new; but you can now combine your cell phone with Wi-Fi to make calls for free on your mobile devices. This could enable you to talk over Wi-Fi and downgrade your cell service to the cheapest plan available – one with fewer voice minutes than you’re currently paying for.
Facebook Calling
Facebook recently announced that iPhone users who have the Facebook Messenger app installed can now make free phone calls to other iPhones users through the app. You’ll be alerted to an incoming call with a Facebook notification rather than with your phone’s ringtone, but if you have a Facebook friend with an iPhone whom you call a lot, this could help you conserve cell minutes.
Skype
Facebook is just the latest in a long line of upstarts taking aim at the established cell service market, like Line2 and Viber, but the biggest player is Skype. Their mobile app lets you make free Skype calls to anyone in the world with a free Skype account. But if you want to call any phone number in the US or Canada, whether or not the person you’re calling has a Skype account, you can pay $3 a month for this unlimited privilege. While $3 a month isn’t free, it could save you more than that on your cell service bill. Calling is simple: just fire up the app and dial the number.
Google Voice
Google offers a comprehensive service called Google Voice. With it, you get one unified phone number that rings on your cell or your landline, plus tons of cool features like transcribing your voicemail – and it makes calls over Wi-Fi. But beware: When you use Google Voice to make calls from your cell phone, it still counts against your cell phone minutes, unless you use an additional app like GrooVe IP or Sipdroid in conjunction with your Google Voice account. This combination will give you completely free Wi-Fi calling that doesn’t count against your minutes.
T-Mobile and Bobsled
T-Mobile has embraced free Wi-Fi calling whole hog. They provide an app called Bobsled to make free calls over Wi-Fi. You can call any US number. It works from any Android or Apple iOS device – not just phones, but computers and tablets as well. Surprisingly, this free service from T-Mobile does not even require you to be a T-Mobile customer; it works with any carrier. As of right now there are over 2 million Bobsled users, and T-Mobile says 95% of them aren’t T-Mobile subscribers For this reason, Bobsled is my number one pick for best way to make free WiFi calls on your smartphone.
But How’s the Quality?
I’ve tested Wi-Fi calling in a number of circumstances, and generally, the quality is pretty good – sometimes I’m aware of a slight delay, and some tinny audio quality, but overall comparable to what I get using my cell phone to make calls in the traditional way. And remember, making calls over Wi-Fi isn’t just about saving a few bucks by downgrading to a cheaper plan. Many people have poor cell reception in the places they use it most – in their own homes or at work – places where they might have an excellent Wi-Fi signal. If this is true for you, you might actually get better quality by making your voice calls using Wi-Fi.

Categories: Strange News, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Senate committee passes email privacy legislation….Cops need a warrant…


Over objections from law enforcement officials, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved legislation Thursday that would require police to obtain a search warrant from a judge before they can review a person’s emails or other electronic communications.
The bill makes it slightly more difficult for the government to access the content of a consumer’s emails and private files from Google, Yahoo, Facebook and other Internet providers. Under the current law, the 1986 Electronic Communications Privacy Act, a warrant is needed only for emails less than 6 months old.
The committee chairman and the bill’s sponsor, Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., said digital files on a computer should have the same safeguards as paper files stored in a home. Americans “face even greater threats to their digital privacy, as we witness the explosion of new technologies and the expansion of the government’s surveillance powers,” Leahy said during the committee’s vote on the legislation. The full Senate is expected to vote on the bill early next year. A House committee hasn’t yet voted on a similar bill.
Passage of the bill comes just a few weeks after the stunning resignation of David Petraeus as the head of the CIA over an extramarital affair with his biographer, Paula Broadwell. The case focused the public’s attention on how easy it is for federal agents to access people’s email accounts.
Privacy advocates and civil liberties groups applauded the action, saying the law is outdated in an era of cloud computing, cheaper electronic storage, social networking and wireless phones. Such advances in technology have dramatically increased the amount of stored communications in ways no one anticipated a quarter of a century ago.
“We are very happy that the committee voted that all electronic content like emails, photos and other communications held by companies like Google and Facebook should be protected with a search warrant,” said Chris Calabrese, legislative counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union.
The Justice Department and other law enforcement groups had resisted changes to the law.

Categories: Politics | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Top 100 search words…2012


Rank Previous Word Posted On
1 1 last name effect June 1, 2011
2 2 digital dualism October 17, 2012
3 – SMIDSY November 13, 2012
4 3 patch burning July 19, 2002
5 4 watercooler moment July 22, 2002
6 6 blog November 17, 2003
7 5 lolbertarian October 16, 2012
8 7 metrosexual September 4, 2002
9 12 doorer October 9, 2012
10 9 zombee October 11, 2012
11 8 flirtationship September 28, 2012
12 10 patchwriting October 3, 2012
13 11 uncumbent October 12, 2012
14 13 tech-life balance October 10, 2012
15 16 highless October 2, 2012
16 14 resistentialism September 30, 2002
17 18 tweetup June 11, 2008
18 17 sageism October 4, 2012
19 19 wet signature April 10, 2000
20 15 placenta pill March 6, 2012
21 25 ineptocracy January 6, 2012
22 20 phishing August 1, 2003
23 22 torch-and-pitchfork March 17, 2009
24 21 beanpole family May 23, 2002
25 23 type T personality April 3, 2003
26 28 third place October 30, 2002
27 24 baby-lag September 27, 2012
28 26 orange-collar September 26, 2012
29 30 CXO July 29, 2002
30 63 omnishambles September 4, 2012
31 29 phone-bin September 20, 2012
32 32 retrosexual October 6, 2004
33 33 defensive pessimism June 12, 2002
34 31 frequency illusion July 16, 2009
35 27 upgradation December 20, 2000
36 34 B2B2C May 15, 2000
37 45 grasstops April 30, 2004
38 35 greengrocers’ apostrophe August 7, 2000
39 38 bucket list November 10, 2010
40 40 cold transfer July 19, 1997
41 42 mansplaining September 19, 2012
42 37 T-shaped October 8, 2003
43 36 Google bombing May 21, 2002
44 43 Stendhal’s syndrome April 1, 2003
45 39 flash mob July 14, 2003
46 49 spotlight effect January 23, 2003
47 47 google April 12, 2001
48 54 BANANA February 19, 1999
49 51 truck roll April 21, 1999
50 48 house money effect June 10, 2003
51 50 gaydar October 11, 1996
52 46 selfie September 21, 2012
53 52 lifestreaming November 6, 2007
54 99 DWY May 17, 2001
55 41 zombie lie April 29, 2011
56 56 physible January 31, 2012
57 58 Wal-Mart effect December 12, 2003
58 53 Sabbath mode October 5, 2001
59 55 client golf May 18, 2001
60 60 undertoad July 21, 1997
61 62 fiberhood September 11, 2012
62 45 patent troll August 13, 2003
63 57 post-gay June 23, 1998
64 59 soft power July 8, 2002
65 66 Humpty Dumpty language February 25, 1999
66 80 hurried child syndrome November 19, 2002
67 88 donorcycle July 8, 2003
68 72 camgirl October 23, 2002
69 76 earworm March 12, 2003
70 81 killboard October 9, 1998
71 71 do-ocracy August 9, 2012
72 79 bluejacking November 21, 2003
73 70 fat finger trade August 14, 2012
74 65 joy-to-stuff ratio August 13, 2002
75 73 Lake Wobegon effect August 15, 2003
76 84 social networking January 12, 2004
77 75 bobo October 30, 2001
78 61 binge viewing August 10, 2012
79 67 thrillax August 15, 2012
80 77 Weblish December 12, 2001
81 88 lipstick lesbian January 12, 2005
82 68 buzzword bingo June 11, 1998
83 91 Pierre Salinger syndrome July 18, 1997
84 86 MOOC August 30, 2012
85 64 cash mob June 26, 2012
86 83 logophilia January 2, 1996
87 93 social networking fatigue February 16, 2007
88 87 RINO April 14, 2004
89 100 sock puppet September 25, 2006
90 78 Affrilachian December 12, 2002
91 69 drink the Kool-Aid October 27, 1998
92 95 ghost bike November 9, 2011
93 90 reax March 26, 2003
94 82 hype cycle November 29, 2001
95 91 enigmatology September 18, 1997
96 99 giggle test January 25, 2002
97 99 technosexual May 10, 2004
98 93 crackberry May 31, 2004
99 74 heteroflexible February 11, 2004
100 85 meatspace
Notice fellow bloggers…just posting this list will allow net searchers to find your blog,
Search engines will pick up the word and depending on your page rank, they will send traffic to you.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

mayanexplore.com

Riviera Maya Travel Guide

Cajun Food, Louisiana History, and a Little Lagniappe

Preservation of traditional River Road cuisine, Louisiana history & architecture, and the communities between Baton Rouge & NOLA

Jali Wanders

Wondering and Wandering

Southpaw Tracks

“If ever a time should come, when vain and aspiring men shall possess the highest seats in Government, our country will stand in need of its experienced patriots to prevent its ruin.” ~Samuel Adams

Pacific Paratrooper

This WordPress.com site is Pacific War era information

what's the formula?

Nurturing awesomeness: from the parents of celebrities, heroes, trailblazers and leaders

Tarheel Red

A Voice of Conservatism Living in Carolina Blue

cancer killing recipe

Just another WordPress.com site

dreamshadow59

A great WordPress.com site

Mike's Look at Life

Photography, memoirs, random thoughts.

Belle Grove Plantation Bed and Breakfast

Birthplace of James Madison and Southern Plantation

Letters for Michael

Lessons on being gay, of love, life and lots of it

Sunny Sleevez

Sun Protection & Green Info

Backcountry Tranquility

A journal about my travels and related experiences :)

LEANNE COLE

Art and Practice

Lukas Chodorowicz

Travel, culture and lifestyle experienced on my adventures around the world. All photos taken by me. Instagram: @colorspark

BunnyandPorkBelly

life is always sweeter and yummier through a lens. bunnyandporkbelly [at] gmail [dot] com

%d bloggers like this: