Posts Tagged With: city council

Ga. city council votes to require gun ownership……


City Councilman Duane Cronic, who sponsored the measure, said he knows the ordinance won’t be enforced but he still believes it will make the town safer.
“I likened it to a security sign that people put up in their front yards. Some people have security systems, some people don’t, but they put those signs up,” he said. “I really felt like this ordinance was a security sign for our city.”
Another purpose, according to the city council’s agenda, is “opposition of any future attempt by the federal government to confiscate personal firearms.”
Council members in Nelson, a small city located 50 miles north of Atlanta, voted unanimously to approve the Family Protection Ordinance. The measure requires every head of household to own a gun and ammunition to “provide for the emergency management of the city” and to “provide for and protect the safety, security and general welfare of the city and its inhabitants.”
Nelson resident Lamar Kellett was one of five people who spoke during a public comment period Monday night and one of two who opposed the ordinance. Among his many objections, he said it dilutes the city’s laws to pass measures that aren’t intended to be enforced.
“Does this mean now 55 miles an hour speed limit means 65, 80, whatever you choose? There’s not a whole lot of difference. A law’s a law,” he said.
Kellett also said the ordinance will have no effect, that it won’t encourage people like him who don’t want a gun to go out and buy one.
The proposal illustrates how the response to the massacre at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., varies widely in different parts of the country.
While lawmakers in generally more liberal states with large urban centers like New York and California have moved to tighten gun control laws, more conservative, rural areas in the American heartland have been going in the opposite direction.
Among the other efforts to broaden gun rights that have surfaced since the Newtown killings:
— Earlier Monday, lawmakers in Oklahoma scuttled a bill that would have allowed public school districts to decide whether to let teachers be armed.
— Spring City, Utah, passed an ordinance this year recommending that residents keep firearms, softening an initial proposal that aimed to require it.
— Residents of tiny Byron, Maine, rejected a proposal last month that would have required a gun in every home. Even some who initially supported the measure said it should have recommended gun ownership instead of requiring it, and worried that the proposal had made the community a laughingstock. Selectmen of another Maine town, Sabbatus, threw out a similar measure. The state’s attorney general said state law prevents municipalities from passing their own firearms laws anyway.
— Lawmakers in about two dozen states have considered making it easier for school employees or volunteers to carry guns on campus. South Dakota passed such a measure last month. Individual communities from New Jersey to Colorado have voted to allow administrators or teachers to carry guns in school.
Located in the Appalachian foothills, Nelson is a tiny, hilly town with narrow, twisting roads. It’s a place where most people know one another and leave their doors unlocked.
It used to be a major source of marble, with the local marble company employing many in town. But that industry is mostly gone now, Mayor Mike Haviland said. There are no retail stores in town anymore, and just about everyone leaves town for work now, making it a bedroom community for Atlanta, he said.
The mayor said he never dreamed his small city would be the focus of national and international media attention, but he understands it.
“It bumps up against the national issues on guns,” he said.
Police Chief Heath Mitchell noted that the city doesn’t have police officers who work 24 hours a day and is far from the two sheriff’s offices that might send deputies in case of trouble, so response times to emergency calls can be long. Having a gun would help residents take their protection into their own hands, he said.
But the chief — the town’s sole police officer — acknowledged the crime rate is very low. He mostly sees minor property thefts and a burglary every few months. The most recent homicide was more than five years ago, he said.
The ordinance is modeled after a similar one adopted in 1982 by Kennesaw, an Atlanta suburb. City officials there worried at the time that growth in Atlanta might bring crime to the community, which now has about 30,000 residents. Kennesaw police have acknowledged that their ordinance is difficult to enforce, and they haven’t made any attempt to do so.
Leroy Blackwell, 82, has lived in Nelson for about 50 years and owns a hunting rifle he keeps in a closet. He said before the council’s decision that he would support the ordinance even if it didn’t have exemptions, but he would have preferred it to be voluntary.
“Really, I think it would be more fair to put it to a vote” so everybody could have a say, he said.

Categories: 2nd Amendment | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

UPDATE: KING RICHARD III….Hunt for Lost King’s Grave Uncovers 17th-Century Garden


The search for the grave of English King Richard III has uncovered a garden said to hold a memorial to the medieval monarch.

University of Leicester archaeologists announced today (Sept. 7) that they have found paving stones that may belong to the garden of Robert Herrick, a mayor of Leicester who built a mansion and garden over the church where Richard III was buried. In 1612, a man named Christopher Wren visited Herrick and reported that the garden contained a 3-foot (1-meter) tall stone pillar inscribed, “Here lies the body of Richard III sometime King of England.”

“This is an astonishing discovery and a huge step forward in the search for King Richard’s grave,” Philippa Langley, a representative of the Richard III society, said in a statement. “Herrick is incredibly important in the story of Richard’s grave, and in potentially helping us get a little bit closer to locating it.”

Richard III ruled England from 1483 to 1485, until his death in battle during the War of the Roses. He was interred in Greyfriars Church in Leicester, but the location of both the church and the grave were lost.
The last known historical record is Wren’s description of Herrick’s garden memorial from 1612. In 1711, Herrick’s descendents sold the mansion. It was torn down in the 1870s and replaced by municipal buildings, according to the University of Leicester. The garden area seems to have remained undeveloped until the 1930s or 1940s, when it was paved over.
The newly discovered paving stones appear to be re-used medieval tiles, worn and of many different sizes, said Richard Buckley, the archaeologist leading the dig.

“Although the date at which the paving was laid has yet to be confirmed, we suspect that it relates to the period of Herrick’s mansion,” Buckley said in a statement. “Interestingly, the 18th-century map of Leicester shows a formal garden with a series of paths leading to a central point.”

Meanwhile, an excavation trench inside the Greyfriars Church has turned up window tracery fragments, Buckley said. These may belong to the east window of the church, near the high altar, which itself is near the choir where Richard III is said to be buried. If the King’s body is found, he will be reinterred in Leicester Cathedral.

“Having overcome the major hurdle of finding the church, I am now confident that we are within touching distance of finding the choir — a real turning point in the project and a stage which, at the outside, I never really thought we might reach,” Buckley said.

Categories: Strange News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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