Posts Tagged With: Cambodia

More statistics than you ever wanted to know about the Vietnam War…


SOBERING STATISTICS FOR THE VIETNAM WAR 

vietnam

 

In case you haven’t been paying attention these past few decades after you returned from Vietnam, the clock has been ticking. The following are some statistics that are at once depressing yet in a larger sense should give you a huge sense of pride. 

 

“Of the 2,709,918 Americans who served in Vietnam, Less than 850,000 are estimated to be alive today, with the youngest American Vietnam veteran’s age approximated to be 60 years old.” 

 

So, if you’re alive and reading this, how does it feel to be among the last 1/3rd of all the U.S. Vets who served in Vietnam? I don’t know about you guys, but it kinda gives me the chills, Considering this is the kind of information I’m used to reading about WWII and Korean War vets… 

 

So the last 14 years we are dying too fast, only the few will survive by 2025…if any.. If true, 390 VN vets die a day. so in 2190 days…from today, lucky to be a Vietnam veteran alive… in only 6-10 years.. 

 

These statistics were taken from a variety of sources to include: The VFW Magazine, the Public Information Office, and the HQ CP Forward Observer – 1st Recon April 12, 1997. 

 

*STATISTICS FOR INDIVIDUALS IN UNIFORM AND IN COUNTRY VIETNAM VETERANS: * 

 

9,087,000 military personnel served on active duty during the Vietnam Era (August 5, 1964 – May 7, 1975). 

 

8,744,000 GIs were on active duty during the war (Aug 5, 1964-March 28, 1973). 

 

2,709,918 Americans served in Vietnam, this number represents 9.7% of their generation. 

 

3,403,100 (Including 514,300 offshore) personnel served in the broader Southeast Asia Theater (Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia,  flight crews based in Thailand, and sailors in adjacent South China Sea waters). 

 

2,594,000 personnel served within the borders of South Vietnam (Jan. 1, 1965 – March 28, 1973). Another 50,000 men served in Vietnam between 1960 and 1964. 

 

Of the 2.6 million, between 1-1.6 million (40-60%) either fought in combat, provided close support or were at least fairly regularly exposed to enemy attack. 

 

7,484 women (6,250 or 83.5% were nurses) served in Vietnam. 

 

Peak troop strength in Vietnam: 543,482 (April 30, 1968). 

 

Agent Orange is taking a huge toll on Vietnam Veterans with most deaths somehow related to Agent Orange exposure. No one officially dies of Agent Orange, they die from the exposure which causes ischemic Heart Disease and failure, Lung Cancer, Kidney failure or COPD related disorders. 

 

CASUALTIES:

 

The first man to die in Vietnam was James Davis, in 1958. He was with the 509th Radio Research Station. Davis Station in Saigon was named for him. 

 

Hostile deaths: 47,378 

Non-hostile deaths: 10,800 

Total: 58,202 (Includes men formerly classified as MIA and Mayaguez casualties). Men who have subsequently died of wounds account for the changing total. 

 

8 nurses died — 1 was KIA. 

 

61% of the men killed were 21 or younger. 

 

11,465 of those killed were younger than 20 years old. 

 

Of those killed, 17,539 were married. 

 

Average age of men killed: 23.1 years 

Enlisted: 50,274; 22.37 years 

Officers: 6,598; 28.43 years 

Warrants: 1,276; 24.73 years 

E1: 525; 20.34 years 

Five men killed in Vietnam were only 16 years old. 

The oldest man killed was 62 years old. 

 

Highest state death rate: West Virginia – 84.1% (national average 58.9% for every 100,000 males in 1970). 

 

Wounded: 303,704 — 153,329 hospitalized + 150,375 injured requiring no hospital care. 

 

Severely disabled: 75,000, — 23,214: 100% disabled; 5,283 lost limbs; 1,081 sustained multiple amputations. 

 

Amputation or crippling wounds to the lower extremities were 300% higher than in WWII and 70% higher than Korea. 

 

Multiple amputations occurred at the rate of 18.4% compared to 5.7% in WWII. 

 

Missing in Action: 2,338 

 

POWs: 766 (114 died in captivity) 

 

As of January 15, 2004, there are 1,875 Americans still unaccounted for, from the Vietnam War. 

 

DRAFTEES VS. VOLUNTEERS:

 

25% (648,500) of total forces in country were draftees. (66% of U.S. armed forces members were drafted during WWII). 

 

Draftees accounted for 30.4% (17,725) of combat deaths in Vietnam. 

 

Reservists killed: 5,977 

 

National Guard: 6,140 served: 101 died. 

 

Total draftees (1965 – 73): 1,728,344. 

 

Actually served in Vietnam: 38% Marine Corps Draft: 42,633. 

 

Last man drafted: June 30, 1973. 

 

RACE AND ETHNIC BACKGROUND:

 

88.4% of the men who actually served in Vietnam were Caucasian; 10.6% (275,000) were black; 1% belonged to other races. 

 

86.3% of the men who died in Vietnam were Caucasian (includes Hispanics); 

 

12.5% (7,241) were black;

 

1.2% belonged to other races. 

 

170,000 Hispanics served in Vietnam; 3,070 (5.2% of total) died there. 

 

70% of enlisted men killed were of North-west European descent. 

 

86.8% of the men who were killed as a result of hostile action were Caucasian; 12.1% (5,711) were black; 1.1% belonged to other races. 

 

14.6% (1,530) of non-combat deaths were among blacks. 

 

34% of blacks who enlisted volunteered for the combat arms. 

 

Overall, blacks suffered 12.5% of the deaths in Vietnam at a time when the percentage of blacks of military age was 13.5% of the total population. 

 

Religion of Dead: Protestant — 64.4%; Catholic — 28.9%; other/none — 6.7% 

 

SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS: 

 

Vietnam veterans have a lower unemployment rate than the same non-vet age groups. 

 

Vietnam veterans’ personal income exceeds that of our non-veteran age group by more than 18 percent. 

 

76% of the men sent to Vietnam were from lower middle/working class backgrounds. 

 

Three-fourths had family incomes above the poverty level; 50% were from middle income backgrounds. 

 

Some 23% of Vietnam vets had fathers with professional, managerial or technical occupations. 

 

79% of the men who served in Vietnam had a high school education or better when they entered the military service. 

 

63% of Korean War vets and only 45% of WWII vets had completed high school upon separation. 

 

Deaths by region per 100,000 of population: South — 31%, West –29.9%; Midwest — 28.4%; Northeast — 23.5%. 

 

DRUG USAGE & CRIME: 

 

There is no difference in drug usage between Vietnam Veterans and non-Vietnam Veterans of the same age group. 

(Source: Veterans Administration Study) 

 

Vietnam Veterans are less likely to be in prison – only one-half of one percent of Vietnam Veterans have been jailed for crimes. 

 

85% of Vietnam Veterans made successful transitions to civilian life. 

 

WINNING & LOSING:

 

82% of veterans who saw heavy combat strongly believe the war was lost because of lack of political will. 

 

Nearly 75% of the public agrees it was a failure of political will, not of arms. 

 

HONORABLE SERVICE:

 

97% of Vietnam-era veterans were honorably discharged.

 

91% of actual Vietnam War veterans and 90% of those who saw heavy combat are proud to have served their country. 

 

74% say they would serve again, even knowing the outcome. 

 

87% of the public now holds Vietnam veterans in high esteem. 

 

INTERESTING CENSUS STATISTICS:

 

1,713,823 of those who served in Vietnam were still alive as of August, 1995 (census figures). 

 

As of the current Census taken during August, 2000, the surviving U.S. Vietnam Veteran population estimate is: 1,002,511. This is hard to believe, losing nearly 711,000 between ’95 and ’00. That’s 390 per day.  

 

The Department of Defense Vietnam War Service Index officially provided by The War Library originally reported with errors that 2,709,918 U.S. military personnel as having served in-country. Corrections and confirmations to this erred index resulted in the addition of 358 U.S. military personnel confirmed to have served in Vietnam but not originally listed by the Department of Defense. (All names are currently on file and accessible 24/7/365). 

 

Isolated atrocities committed by American Soldiers produced torrents of outrage from anti-war critics and the news media while Communist atrocities were so common that they received hardly any media mention at all. The United States sought to minimize and prevent attacks on civilians while North Vietnam made attacks on civilians a centerpiece of its strategy. Americans who deliberately killed civilians received prison sentences while Communists who did so received commendations. 

 

From 1957 to 1973, the National Liberation Front assassinated 36,725 Vietnamese and abducted another 58,499. The death squads focused on leaders at the village level and on anyone who improved the lives of the peasants such as medical personnel, social workers, and school teachers.

Categories: Uncategorized, vietnam war, War | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hstory of Gun Control…do you still want it?


gun control
A LITTLE GUN HISTORY
In 1929, the Soviet Union established gun control. From 1929 to 1953, about 20 million dissidents, unable to defend themselves, were rounded up and exterminated.

In 1911, Turkey established gun control. From 1915 to 19
17, 1.5 million Armenians, unable to defend themselves, were rounded up and exterminated.

Germany established gun control in 1938 and from 1939 to 1945, a total of 13 million Jews and others who were unable to defend themselves were rounded up and exterminated.

China established gun control in 1935. From 1948 to 1952, 20 million political dissidents, unable to defend themselves were rounded up and exterminated.

Guatemala established gun control in 1964. From 1964 to 1981, 100,000 Mayan Indians, unable to defend themselves, were rounded up and exterminated.

Uganda established gun control in 1970. From 1971 to 1979, 300,000 Christians, unable to defend themselves, were rounded up and exterminated.

Cambodia established gun control in 1956. From 1975 to 1977, one million educated people, unable to defend themselves, were rounded up and exterminated.

56 million defenseless people rounded up and exterminated in the 20th Century because of gun control:

You won’t see this data on the US evening news, or hear politicians disseminating this information.

Guns in the hands of honest citizens save lives and property and, yes, gun-control laws adversely affect only the law-abiding citizens.

Take note my fellow Americans, before it’s too late!

The next time someone talks in favor of gun control, please remind them of this history lesson.

With guns, we are ‘citizens’. Without them, we are ‘subjects’.

During WWII the Japanese decided not to invade America because they knew most Americans were ARMED!

If you value your freedom, please spread this antigun-control message to all of your friends.

SWITZERLAND ISSUES EVERY HOUSEHOLD A GUN!
SWITZERLAND’S GOVERNMENT TRAINS EVERY ADULT THEY ISSUE A RIFLE.
SWITZERLAND HAS THE LOWEST GUN RELATED CRIME RATE OF ANY CIVILIZED COUNTRY IN THE WORLD!!!
IT’S A NO BRAINER!
DON’T LET OUR GOVERNMENT WASTE MILLIONS OF OUR TAX DOLLARS IN AN EFFORT TO MAKE ALL LAW ABIDING CITIZENS AN EASY TARGET.

Spread the word everywhere you can that you are a firm believer in the 2nd Amendment!

It’s time to speak loud before they try to silence and disarm us.

You’re not imagining it, history shows that governments always manipulate tragedies to attempt to disarm the people. —Hawk Seeker of Liberty—

Categories: 2nd Amendment, Bill of Rights, Constitution | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Mystery of Angkor Wat Temple’s Huge Stones Solved……



===========================================================================
The massive sandstone bricks used to construct the 12th-century temple of Angkor Wat were brought to the site via a network of hundreds of canals, according to new research.
The findings shed light on how the site’s 5 million to 10 million bricks, some weighing up to 3,300 pounds (1,500 kilograms), made it to the temple from quarries at the base of a nearby mountain.
“We found many quarries of sandstone blocks used for the Angkor temples and also the transportation route of the sandstone blocks,” wrote study co-author Estuo Uchida of Japan’s Waseda University, in an email.
In the 12th century, King Suryavarman II of the Khmer Empire began work on a 500-acre (200 hectare) temple in the capital city of Angkor, in what is now Cambodia. The complex was built to honor the Hindu god Vishnu, but 14th-century leaders converted the site into a Buddhist temple.
Archaeologist knew that the rock came from quarries at the base of a mountain nearby, but wondered how the sandstone bricks used to build Angkor Wat reached the site. Previously people thought the stones were ferried to Tonle Sap Lake via canal, and then rowed against the current through another river to the temples, Uchida told LiveScience.
To see whether this was the case, Uchida’s team surveyed the area and found 50 quarries along an embankment at the base of Mt. Kulen. They also scoured satellite images of the area and found a network of hundreds of canalsand roads linking the quarries to the temple site. The distance between the quarries and the site along the route Uchida’s team found was only 22 miles (37 kilometers), compared with the 54 miles (90 km) the river route would have taken.
The grid of canals suggests the ancient builders took a shortcut when constructing the temple, which may explain how the imposing complex was built in just a few decades.

Categories: Strange News, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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