Posts Tagged With: buried

Arizona…Lost Shipment Of Dragoon Pistols:


59299085_1426688107474422_7914077331415629824_nIt was in 1871 that a shipment of 24 Colt Dragoon Pistols was making its way from back East to its final destination at Fort McDowell. The pistols were under military escort, consisting of eight men. A sergeant, four soldiers a Lieutenant as well as a civilian packer.

The escort left Camp Pinal (Picket Post Mountain in Superior) beginning their arduous journey to Fort McDowell. After traveling on the only real road at the time (which was a stage road) the soldiers were attacked by between 15-25 Apaches at a spot where the road narrows tightly between two hills, making an ambush a flawless success.

As the first explosion of Apache’s gun fire erupted and in less than 15 seconds the four soldiers and the civilian packer were killed in a failed attempt to return fire. The Lieutenant and Sergeant grabbed the reigns of the pack mule that was carrying the pistols and made a frantic attempt to get away from the ambush and make their way back to the garrison Camp Pinal.

They rode like hell over several ridges and down into washes while being pursued by the Apaches, but were soon cut off by more warriors riding down on them from their chosen escape route. So the Lieutenant and Sergeant cut north and either rounded a sharp bend and took shelter inside of a small cave and prepared for their defense. The first warrior to round the bend charged the cave and was shot in the face by the Lieutenant and the pursuing Apache dispersed (at least appeared to disperse).

After about three hours of waiting and not seeing any signs of movement around them from the Apache, they decided to lighten their load to make a fast get away to Fort McDowell through the Superstition Mountains. So they took off the 24 Pistols that were packed on the mule and buried them in the floor of that small cave and then made good their escape.

As they made their way through the Superstition Mountains they could see in from a distance the Apache in return watching them from rocks high above but they didn’t make any movement to attack. As the Lieutenant and Sergeant were near the Salt River and clear of the Superstition Mountains, the Apache attacked yet again. The warriors knew exactly where to lay the ambush and exactly where they had to exit the mountains and cross the Salt River. The Sergeant was shot out of his saddle and the Lieutenant just spurred his mount and made a desperate attempt to escape and rode straight through the ambush. He was now the only survivor and eventually made his way to Fort McDowell and reported what had occurred.

General Crook dispatched two or three companies of troopers to go with the Lieutenant to the place where he had buried the Pistols and to investigate the attack. The troopers gathered up the bodies (what was left of them) but the Lieutenant could not recall where the cave was located where he had buried the pistols. He was new to Arizona and didn’t know the terrain, the only ones in his escort party who did know the Mountains and trails and passes were killed during the attack. The soldiers continued searching while in frustration but with no results.

The exact cave was never located and the pistols were never recovered and still waiting to be found to this very day. If these pistols could be found they could fetch a nice price but more importantly, they would be a priceless link to our states beautiful and bloody history.

(While on your search please carry water with you and watch for rattle snakes as the temperatures grown higher and higher. Try to stay cool and always tell someone where you will be going and when to expect you home).

Categories: Arizona, artifacts, hidden, Legends, Lost Treasure, Old West, Treasure Hunters, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Legends | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Some GHOST TOWNS OF ILLINOIS


 

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JO DAVIESS COUNTY

1…Council Hill…near the State line on railroad, 7 miles Northeast of Galena
2…Scales Mound…near State line on railroad, 13 miles West of Warren
3…Law…near State line on railroad, 10 miles West of Warren
4…Apple River…on the State line and railroad, 5 miles West of Warren
5…Winston…on railroad, 5 miles East Southeast of Galena
6…Schapville…4 1/2 miles Northwest of Woodbine
7…Blanding…on railroad and Mississippi River, 5 miles West Northwest of Hanover.
8…Old Hanover…in the far Southwest corner ofthe county on railroad and Mississippi River, 4 1/2 miles South Southwest of present Hanover.
9…Derinda Center…5 miles Southeast of Elizabeth
10…Pleasant Valley…on the South County line and the Plum River, 5 miles South Southwest of Willow.
STEVENSON COUNTY

1…Afolkey…4 miles Northwest of Dakota
2…Damascus…4 miles West of Cedarville
3…Winneshiek…5 miles Northeast of Freeport
4…Dunbar…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles South of Freeport
5…Stevens…2 miles North of German Valley
WINNEBAGO COUNTY
1…Letham Park…on the railroad, 5 miles South of Rockton
2…Genet..on the railroad, 3 miles West of Loves Park
3…Alworth…on the railroad, 5 miles East of Seward
4…Elida…on the South County line, 4 miles South of Winnebago
BOONE COUNTY
1…Amesville…near Garden Paririe…old stage coach stop on the Old Galena/Chicago Road.
MC HENRY COUNTY
1…Lawrence…on the railroad, 3 miles Northwest of Harvard
2…Armsby…on the railroad and State line, 3 miles West of Richmond
3…Sonon Mills…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles Southeast of Richmond
4…Johnburg…2 1/2 miles Northeast of McHenry
5…Terra Cotta…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles South of McHenry
6…North Crystal lake…on the railroad, 2 miles Northeast of Crystal Lake
7…Coral…2 miles Southeast of Marengo
8…Coyne…on the railroad and South county line, 1 1/2 miles West of Huntley.
LAKE COUNTY
1…Hickory…3 miles West of Rosecrans
2…Gilmer…on the railroad, 4 miles Southwest of Mundelein
CARROLL COUNTY
1…Marcus…on the railroad by North County line, 6 miles Northwest of Savanna.
2…Barth…on the North County line, 8 miles North Northwest of Mt. Carroll
3…Palsgrove…on the North County line, 6 miles North of Mt. Carroll
4…Keltner…on the North County line, 7 1/2 miles Northwest of Lanark
5…Hickory Grove…on the railroad, 5 miles East of Savanna
6…Timbuctoo…on the railroad, 5 miles South Southeast of Savanna
7…Big Cut…on the railroad, 3 1/2 miles Southwest of Mt. Carroll
8…Ashdale…on the railroad, 3 miles West of Lanark
9…Nursery…5 miles East of Lanark

Categories: artifacts, Ghost Towns, Haunting, hidden, Metal Detecting, silver, silver coins, treasure, Treasure Hunting, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

200 silver denarius discovered in Empúries, largest treasure found so far in the Roman site……


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Els 200 denaris de plata descoberts al jaciment d’Empúries aquest 21 de juliol del 2016 (Horitzontal).

Barcelona (CNA).- The 2,500-year-old Empúries site on the Costa Brava continues to provide surprises. The last three weeks of excavations, carried out by thirty students attending the 70th edition of Archaeology Course of Empúries, lead to the largest treasure ever found on the site; a ceramic-vase containing 200 silver denarius dating from the 1st century B.C. Thanks to the good conditions of the treasure, the archaeologists have concluded that the treasure would have been hidden by its owner in one of the rooms of the houses which are also being excavated. The treasure would have been lost after a fire which hit the property. Besides this treasure, 24 amphorae of wine have been discovered in the cellar the house, a slab of bronze -‘simpulum’- to extract wine and two bracelets. 

The discoveries were found on the oldest levels of the Roman city. In particular, inside a house of the 1st century BC which was excavated before. This time, the archaeologists have focuses on the cellar, where 24 amphorae of wine were found, most of them of Italic origin, a slab of bronze -‘simpulum’- to extract wine and two bracelets.

However, the most important discovery was found further from the cellar. A ceramic-vase in the shape of an amphorae with 200 silver denarius inside. According one of the responsible of the excavation team, Pere Castanyer “not even the most optimistic would have imagined that there were so many coins”.

Waiting for the analysis to be completed, the archaeologists believe that the treasure would have been hidden intentionally and that his owner never had the change to recover it. “This was a huge amount of money by that time and would have allowed the owner to live comfortably for quite a long time” stated Castanyer and explained that a soldiers’ wage was about 10 denarius and that a monthly rent in that period was around 2 denarius.

Empúries, a site with 108 years of success

Known as the ruins of Empúries, the excavations began up to 180 years ago and they have always “yielded results” since then, stressed Archaeology Museum of Catalonia’s Director, Josep Manuel Rueda. He also praised the research and good management that the team responsible for the site have carried out so far. All in all, he added, has allowed Empúries to become an international benchmark and “the most important” in Catalonia.

Categories: artifacts, hidden, Lost Treasure, roman coins, silver, silver coins, treasure, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Kentucky Treasure Legends…


 

uruguayan_treasure_580x360_1Kentucky

McCraken County

1…Coins dated in the late 1800’s have been found on the South Bank of the Ohio River
near West Paducah, they are believed to be washing from the wreck of a steamboat
that sank somewhere upstream.

2…Late in the Civil War, the Cole brothers sold their tobacco crop for $5,000 in Gold
coins which they hid in the fireplace hearth in their cabin, 20 miles from Paducah.
A few weeks later a robber broke into the cabin and killed them both. He then hid the
cache somewhere near the house and fled pursing lawmen.
Around 1900, dying, he told teh story of the gold coins to a close friend who traveled to
Kentucky to recover the treasure. Upon arrival he fouund out the cabin had been tore
down shortly after the brothers murder and he was unable to locate the treasure.

Crittenden County

1…River pirates and outlaws are said to have hidden some of their stolen property and
loot at different places along the river shore and inland in Crittenden County. Using
Cave-in-Rock, in Illinois, they would go across the river to hid their loot.

2…The Harpe brothers buried treasure in Critenden County. The also used Cave-in
Rock as a hideout.

3…Numerous caches are believed to be buried along the old Ford’s Ferry-Highwater Road
the 12 mile long road that connected Potts Hill with the Ford Ferry Terminus on the Illinois side
of the river.

4…A group of counterfeiters hid a cache of Gold near Dycusburg on the Cumberland River
before they were captured. It has never been found

5…A man named Moore in the 1800’s lived near Dycusburg on the Cumberland River and was
killed by two (2) hired hands for the money he had hidden on his property. The hired hands were
imprisoned for life and admitted they never found the money.

Webster County

1…Outlaw Micajah Harpe (Harpe brothers gang) who murdered and robbed from 1795-1804,
buried $300,000 in the area of Harpe’s Head Road near Dixon. It has never been recovered.

Logan County

1…Jesse James and his gang were force to bury $50,000 in gold coins near Russellville in 1868.
The money was taken from the Russellville Bank. It was hidden on the outskirts of town in a cave to the West of the city.

Categories: Ancient Treasure, artifacts, Civil War, Confederate, gold, gold coins, Kentucky, KGC, Legends, Lost gold, Lost Mines, Lost Treasure, Myths, Outlaws, silver, silver coins, treasure, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Skeleton of Burnt ‘Witch Girl’ Found in Italy….


Italian archaeologists have unearthed the remains of a Medieval teenage girl who was burnt and thrown carelessly in a pit, her grave covered with heavy stone slabs.

Her burial shows she was seen as a danger even when dead, according to the archaeologists.

The skeleton was discovered at the complex of San Calocero in Albenga on the Ligurian Riviera, by a team led by scientific director Philippe Pergola, professor of topography of the Orbis Christianus Antiquus at the Pontifical Institute of Archaeology at the Vatican.

 

At the same location, in September 2014, the team unearthed the remains of another “witch girl,” a 13-year-old female who was buried face-down.

Like other deviant burials, in which the dead were buried with a brick in the mouth, nailed or staked to the ground, or even decapitated and dismembered, both the face-down burial and the stone-covered tomb aimed at preventing the dead girls from rising from the grave.

Further analysis determined the “witch girl” who was buried face-down just suffered from scurvy, a disorder caused by an insufficient intake of vitamin C.

It is unlikely the two witch girls are related. While the first girl died between the first half of 1400 and the beginning of 1500, the newly found skeleton is likely older, the archaeologists say.

“We are waiting for the radiocarbon dating results. At the moment we can date the burial between the 9th and the 15th century,” said archaeologist Stefano Roascio, the excavation director.

Standing just 4.75 feet tall, the girl was 15-17 years old when she died. She was burnt in an unknown location and then brought to the San Calocero site where she was hastily buried.

“We can’t say whether she was alive or not when she was burnt. Fire attacked her body when soft tissues were still present, so it could have occurred before death or soon after,” anthropologist Elena Dellù told Discovery News.

The girl was hurriedly interred, with only heavy stones thrown over her grave.

“She was taken by her elbows and just thrown in the pit. Her head leaned on the vertical wall of the pit, so that it was bent. Indeed, her chin almost touched the breastbone,” Dellù said.

Preliminary analysis revealed porotic hyperostosis on the skull and orbits. These are areas of spongy or porous bone tissue and are the result of severe iron deficiency anemia.

Enamel hypoplasia, a condition in which enamel becomes weak, was also present and pointed to childhood stresses such as malnutrition.

Her pallor, her possible hematomas and fainting might have scared the community.

The condition appear similar to that of the first “witch girl” who was diagnosed with scurvy on the basis of porotic hyperostosis found in crucial points. The spongy areas were present on the external surface of the occipital bone, on the orbital roofs, near the dental sockets and on the palate, and on the greater wings of the sphenoid.

“Unfortunately the skeleton of the second girl is damaged right in those bones where scurvy can be diagnosed. However, we cannot rule it out completely given theporotic hyperostosis on the skull,” Dellù said.

The excavation, which is currently funded by private foundations (Fondazione Nino Lamboglia of Rome and Fondazione bancaria De Mari of Savona) will continue in 2016.

“At the end of the digging campaign we will focus on specific analysis. If the radiocarbon dating shows the two girls are from the same period, we will try to compare their DNA,” Dellù said.

Categories: Archaeology, artifacts, Execution, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Spanish treasure of COCOS ISLAND…..


While Simon Bolivar marched through Peru in 1823, a group of Spaniards in Lima seized the state treasure to keep it out of the hands of Bolivar.

The treasure, now estimated to be valued at more than $20 million, consisted of 200 chests of jewels, 250 swords with jeweled hilts, 150 silver chalices, 300 bars of gold and 600 bars of silver, just to describe some of the trinkets taken.

To get their treasure out of South America, it was put on board the Mary Dier which was under the command of a Scotsman called William Thompson.

The governor of Lima and a bishop, along with some other Spaniards traveled with the treasure so that the wrong hands wouldn’t get hold of it. They were no match for Thompson and his crew and were killed outright. Thompson then ordered his crew to sail his vessel to the island of Cocos which is on the Pacific side of Costa Rica. There, the treasure was stashed in a cave. Soon after leaving the island, they were captured by a Spanish frigate and Thompson and a member of his crew was returned to Cocos on the promise that their lives would be spared if they disclosed the whereabouts of the treasure. Once on the island, Thompson and his crew member escaped. The Spanish left the island empty handed and Thompson was rescued when a whaler showed up to get a supply of fresh water. He claimed that the crewman died. Thompson never returned to the island but he later gave his friend John Keating a chart which specifically stated where the treasure could be found.

Keating went to the island and rediscovered the treasure but the crew of the vessel he was sailing on mutinied and Keating and a friend narrowly escaped to the island with their lives. Keating was rescued (without his friend who, not unlike Thompson’s friend, also died) and Keating, like Thompson, never returned to the island. He did however entrust his secret to a friend.

In 1872, Thomas Welsh and his wife, the owners of the South Pacific Treasure Island Prospecting Company and several of their followers dug a tunnel 85 meters into the mountain on Cocos Island but netted nothing for their efforts.

A German named August Gisler, using a treasure map which supposedly belonged to a pirate called Benito Bonito, searched the island from 1899 to 1909. He found no treasure but he did find clues, such as stone with the letter K (for Keating) carved in it and a cable attached to a hook.

Since then, there have been several expeditions to the island, and even Sir Malcolm Campbell, (the famous race driver) Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Count Felix von Luckner tried their hands at searching for the treasure.

In 1932, Colonel J.E. Leckie using the services of a metal detector did uncover some of the gold, however, to this day; the bulk of the treasure still remains on the island. Cocos Island is situated 643 kilometers west of Costa Rica and can be reached only by a chartered boat.

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Lost Treasure of Dutch Schultz


Arthur Flegenheimer, also known as Dutch Schultz, was a New York City gangster during the 1920’s and 30’s. He was born to German Jewish immigrants Emma and Herman Flegenheimer August 6, 1902. His profession, organized crime, netted him a fortune before his death October 23, 1935.

Schultz’s gang related activities included practices such as boot legging alcohol, murder and running a numbers racket. Dutch Schultz had a long criminal history and was once declared Public Enemy #1 by the FBI. Rumors abound Schultz buried millions in Phoenicia, New York, in the Catskills region shortly before his death. However, to date it hasn’t been found.

It was while Federal Prosecutor Thomas E. Dewey was pursuing him on income tax evasion charges Schultz decided to stash his money. He had seen many others incarcerated, and when they reentered society, found their former territories taken over by rival gangsters. So he gathered up his millions he had earned in ill gotten gains and buried it somewhere.

Some say his treasure was all in currency, others say it was double-eagle gold pieces, while still others describe it as a combination of cash, gold, and jewels. The value of the hoarded treasure is also at question. Some versions of the story say $5 million, while other versions claim it was $7 or even $9 million. Whatever the amount was, it was supposedly gathered into tobacco sacks, stored in either an iron box or steel suitcase and hidden away.

An Angry Schultz
An Angry Schultz

Last Dying Words

It was only upon Schultz’s death the existence of this treasure was discovered. On his deathbed, a police stenographer recorded every word Schultz uttered between bouts of fever induced delirium. Itwas mostly nonsense, but some think there may have been a few vague, veiled references to his treasure.

When Schultz’s last dying words hit the newspapers it spawned as many versions of the buried treasure as there were stories of the Dutchman himself. Even while he was dying from gunshot wounds to the colon, liver, spleen, and stomach he refused to name his associates the men who shot him, or the whereabouts of his fortune.

A Mysterious Map

Many theories about the treasure evolved, most involving Phoenicia, and a mysterious map, supposedly drawn by another mobster, Lulu Rosenkranz, in case the location should ever be forgotten.

Several story versions place the location along Route 28 between the roadway and the Esopus Creek. Others believe it’s along railroad tracks leading into Phoenicia. Perhaps the most popular version is Schultz and Lulu Rosenkranz carried a steel safe to Phoenicia on an April night in 1933 and buried it in a grove of pine trees near the Esopus, with an “X” marking the tree under which they buried it.

A more detailed version of the events was revealed by a man over 80 years old who claimed to have first-hand knowledge of the day Schultz buried his treasure. His account has the treasure being buried the fateful afternoon Schultz and his gang were ambushed at the Palace Chop House.

According to the old timer Dutch and one of his men, probably Rosenkranz, stopped for lunch at the Phoenicia Hotel, in the center of town. Around one o’clock they left in a car got in a car, and drove onto Route 214. They proceeded north along the Stony Clove Creek for about eight miles, and hid their loot beneath a skull-shaped rock known as the Devil’s Face. They were back in Phoenicia by three o’clock. From there they returned to Newark…and the rest is history.

Another Phoenicia old-timer, Mickey Simpson, remembered Schultz well. He had his own thoughts about the treasure. “Sure,” he said in 1991, “Schultz might have buried his loot by the Esopus Creek, but if he did, it’s long gone.” Simpson was obviously referring to a number of serious floods over the years. “… and surely even an iron box couldn’t have survived them all. “Personally, I wouldn’t step off this porch for it,” Simpson continued. “It’s probably somewhere at the bottom of the Ashokan Reservoir.”

There are also local stories residents like to tell such as the elderly man who used to walk along the railroad tracks digging holes. When questioned about what he was digging for, he would simply reply, “Dutch Schultz’s buried treasure.” The railroad finally made him stop.

And a Phoenicia motel operator used to let treasure hunters dig on his property. However they first had to sign a legal document promising him a split if they found anything. He soon learned he wasn’t as smart as he thought he was. A particularly resourceful treasure hunter showed up one day with a backhoe. He dug dozens of holes and left without filling them back in. The motel operator abandoned the practice.

Schultz met his end on a Wednesday evening, October 23, 1935. It happened at the Palace Chop House and Tavern in Newark, New Jersey. A group of four well dressed men made their way to a secluded private dining room in the back of the establishment…Schultz was one of the four. After ordering drinks and dinner, the men began talking business. By 10:00 pm the bar and restaurant were empty except for the four diners, a couple on the dance floor upstairs, the bartender and a few employees in the kitchen.

Two men entered, one with a shotgun and the other brandishing a pistol. The two men made their way to the dining room, and opened fire. Three men at the table were shot and wounded. The fourth, the intended “hit”, was found in the bathroom. Schultz, and his three associates were mortally wounded.

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Locked tomb in eastern China may hold key to fate of little-known emperor 2,000 years ago…


Chinese archaeologists working on a royal cemetery dating to the Han dynasty 2,000 years ago say the site is the most complete and well-preserved set of tombs they have unearthed, state media reports.

But a key mystery remains: experts hope a locked coffin in the main mausoleum contains relics – an emperor’s seal perhaps – that could confirm the identity of the ancient occupants, according to Xinhua.

The site is large, stretching across 40,000 square metres in a rural area outside of Nanchang city in Jiangxi province. Archaeologists have uncovered eight main tombs and a chariot burial area with walls that run nearly 900 metres.

Bronze lamps shaped like ducks.

They believe it is the burial site of Liu He – the grandson of Emperor Wu, who was the most influential ruler of the Western Han Dynasty (206BC-AD25) – and Liu’s wife along with a handful of family members.

Exact details about the era remain sketchy, but it’s thought Liu had a brief but dramatic stint in power – he assumed the throne but was ousted only to later return and be forced out again.

Bronze and ceramic wares.

Archaeologists have discovered terracotta figures, musical instruments, some 10 tonnes of bronze coins and more than 10,000 items made from gold, jade, iron, wood and bamboo.

A network of roads and a drainage system can also be seen.

Xin Lixiang, a researcher from the National Museum who is leading the dig, said his team would next turn to the mysterious coffin.

Archaeologists at the site hope a sealed tomb will contain relics such as an emperor’s seal that could positively identify the interned.

“There may be a royal seal and jade clothes that will suggest the status and identity of the tomb’s occupant,” Xin said.

The State Administration of Cultural Relics has instructed the site supervisors to apply for a world heritage listing with the United Nation’s cultural body, Unesco.

Categories: Ancient Treasure, Archaeology, China, Emperor | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Louisiana….WWII vehicles, planes may be in containers buried under Kisatchie National Forest…


A conversation 34 years ago convinced Morton Hurston Jr. there is buried treasure in Central Louisiana, and he thinks he’s found it. One thing stands in the way of him finding out for sure: government permission.

 Under the yellow clay soil of the Kisatchie National Forest, Hurston said he believes, is all manner of World War II equipment — tanks, half-track vehicles, trucks, jeeps and even P-40 fighter planes packed in their original shipping crates.

Hurston, of Baton Rouge, calls this a virtual gold mine of a time capsule, a potential source of exhibits for museums and other military displays. The P-40s, packed in corrosion preventative, might be in mint condition.

“There are only six P-40s flying in the world,” he said. “This could be a very significant historic site.”

Hurston believes the equipment was buried in 1943 at Camp Claiborne, an Army facility north of Forest Hill in Rapides Parish used during World War II, mostly for basic training and artillery practice. Camp Claiborne closed in 1948 and, except for signs on La. 112, little of it remains today.

In 1981, Hurston, an Army veteran of the Vietnam War and then an East Baton Rouge sheriff’s reserve deputy, met Jackie Peters, then a full-time deputy. Peters told him that his brother’s father-in-law, Sam Rathburn, of Baker, had described how he was a heavy equipment operator who helped dig three long trenches. A railroad spur was built, and the equipment was brought to the site, driven into the trenches, then covered with the soil, forming three berms.

Why?

Neither Hurston nor Peters, who also has tried to investigate the site, has found any paperwork acknowledging the equipment burial. Peters said he thinks the equipment, which was no longer state-of-the-art, had been sold to China, but it couldn’t be delivered because Japanese forces had cut off land access to that country. So, it was buried to prevent sabotage and, it seems, forgotten.

But not by Peters or Hurston.

When Peters was in the Navy Reserves in the 1980s, he knew men in an antisubmarine squadron who had an aerial magnetometer. He asked them if they could explore the area.

“They flew over and did a magnetometer sweep,” Peters said. “They said there was so much junk down there, ‘we couldn’t tell what was down there. It just blew us off the screen.’”

Peters also enlisted the help of helicopter pilot Reggie Fontenot, who approached Forest Service officials in Louisiana roughly 10 years ago about conducting an exploratory dig.

“They flatly said no, no way,” Fontenot said. “These are people that I knew and worked with, and they said they weren’t even going to entertain the thought of a request on it. … They said they didn’t see it as in the interest of the federal government.”

Unbeknownst to Peters, Hurston also has visited the site several times, and, in the past two years, he intensified his efforts. Remembering what Peters had told him about the site’s location, Hurston found three long, elevated areas on a topographical map and discovered berms, or small hills, overgrown with pine trees and bushes.

In 2014, Hurston spoke to U.S. Forest Service archeologist Velicia Bergstrom, who said she had never heard of such a site. Hurston hired a Houston firm, Ground Penetrating Radar Systems, to see if the berms covered anything unusual. Because he had to clear brush for the electromagnetic imaging equipment to work, there was time to survey only 100 feet of one berm. The equipment detected five objects at least the size of an automobile, Hurston said. Surveys of the ground adjacent to the berm turned up nothing.

So, Hurston said, something is definitely down there.

“We think that many items could be restorable because the compacted clay, according to my geologist friends and according to the … archaeologists, compacted clay forms like an impermeable membrane,” he said. “It can encase like concrete to prevent air and water intrusion that causes oxidation. Specifically, we believe that if, in fact, those aircraft are there … that they can be in good condition for restoration.”

Hurston wants to do a more detailed electromagnetic survey and, if that shows promise, do an exploratory dig to determine exactly what is buried. To break ground, he needs Forest Service permission. That’s where things have stalled.

He has gone up the Forest Service hierarchy through to Michael Kaczor, federal preservation officer in Washington, D.C., who referred him to Jim Caldwell, public affairs officer for Kisatchie National Forest. They spoke last week, and Caldwell directed him to District Ranger Lisa Lewis.

“I think it’s very interesting what might be out there,” Caldwell said. “The more knowledge we can gather, the better. If there’s really something out there, wouldn’t it be something if we had a hand in getting it to a museum so everybody could see it?”

That’s what Hurston wants.

“That is our (the public’s) stuff,” he said. “The Forest Service does not own that. They manage the surface area of the forest. That’s their job: to keep that managed. They don’t own that stuff.”

Categories: Louisiana, WWII | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Louisiana Treasure….Ghost Towns and Legends. Franklin, Madison and Richland Parishes…


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Franklin Parish…Louisiana
Ghost Towns.
1. Durham, North County Line, 10 miles due North of Crowville
2. Warsay, on the Bayou Macon, 5 miles NorthEast of Crowville
3. Cordill, 6 miles NorthEast of Chase
4. Como, 5 miles NorthEast of Gilbert
5. Liddieville, 7 miles West of Winnsboro by West County Line
6. Mason, 5 miles West of Fort Neccessity by West County Line
7. Hollygrove, 2 miles West of Peck
Treasure legend.
1. A man named Evans buried his life savings around the 1900’s in 2 half gallon fruit jars. It was all in $10 and $20 gold pieces. The location is somewhere on his farm, 3 miles East of Baskin.

MADISON PARISH…Louisiana
Ghost Towns
1. Reynolds, on railroad spur and North County line, 2 miles Southwest of Sondheimer.
2. Katz, on railroad spur, 4 miles Southwest of Sondheimer
3. Omega, on the Mississippi River, 6 miles North Northeast of Tallulah
4. Mulikens Bend, on the Mississippi River, 2 miles South Southeast of Omega.
5. Tendal, on railroad, 2 1/2 miles East of Waverly
6. Quebec, on railroad, 5 miles East of Waverly, old steamboat landing on the Tensas River
7. Lake One, on railroad, 7 miles East of Waverly
8. Richmond, 2 1/2 miles South of Tallulah on the junction of Brushy and Round Away Bayous. Was a prosperous trading center, burned down twice, accidently in 1859 and by Federal Troops in 1863. Only foundations remain.
9. Barnes, on railroad, 5 miles East Southeast of Tallulah
10. Thomastown, on railroad, 8 miles East Southeast of Tallulah
11. Duckport, on the Mississippi River, 2 1/2 miles North of Mound
12. Ashwood, on bank of Lake Palmyra, old river landing.
13. Old Delta, located several miles East of present day Delta, town was move when the river changed course in 1876, the old townsite later became a haven for bootleggers and robbers.
14. Coleman, 3 1/2 miles Southwest of Mound
15. Alligator Bayou, on railroad, 3 1/2 miles North Northwest of Afton
16. Quimby, on railroad and South County line, 2 miles West Southwest of Afton.
17. Trinidad, 5 miles East Northeast of Afton
18. King, on the South County line, 5 miles due East of Afton
19. Griffin, on the Mississippi River, 13 miles due East of Afton.
Treasure Legends
1. Legend puts an early 1800’s outlaw and robber in the area of the Mason Hills for hidden loot. It is a stretch of Highlands across the Mississippi River from Vicksburg, Mississippi.
2. Indian Gold and treasure was supposed to have been found by Sieur de La Salle in 1682 at the great Indian town of Taensas. The town was located somewhere below Grand Gulf and Vicksburg on the West bank of he Mississippi River.

RICHLAND PARISH…Louisiana

GHOST TOWNS
1. Tonesburg, on railroad, 3 1/2 miles North of Rayville
2. Dunn, on railroad, 3 1/2 miles West of Delhi
3. Lucknow, 5 miles South of Start
4. Burke, on railroad, 4 miles North of Archibald
5. Buckner, 4 miles West of Alto
6. Charlieville, 5 miles Southwest of Alto
7. Boughton, 8 miles South of Alto
TREASURE LEGENDS
1. The mouth of the Bayou Amulet was a trading rendezvous location. Artifacts should be found at this location.
2. A man named Bullen lived West of Delhi on Eudora Road during the Civil War, later named McLaurin farm, fearing the Federal Troops he took his life savings in gold coins and dropped them into a well. He died a few days later and the gold has yet to be recovered.
3. A famous local outlaw named Samuel Mason buried his loot and treasure near Delhi, but non has been recovered yet.
4. Frank and Jesse James had a hideout near Delhi, on the outskirts of town. Locals believe they may have buried treasure in the area. (Note: they would have left KGC symbols to help in relocating any treasure buried)

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