Posts Tagged With: buried gold

Leon Trabuco’s Gold….


Leon Trabuco’s Gold

In 1933, Leon Trabuco was a Mexican millionaire. He believed he could use the Great Depression of the United States to increase his fortune. Convinced the United States would soon devalue the dollar and that gold prices would skyrocket, Trabuco and four other men bought up much of Mexico’s gold reserves to resell in the United States when the price went up.

At a makeshift Mexican foundry, gold coins and jewelry were melted down and cast into ingots. In less than three months, he and partners had collected almost sixteen tons of solid gold. They smuggled the gold into the United States, where if caught, they faced long prison terms. Trabuco searched for a safe place to hide the illegal treasure, but eventually, he decided it would be smarter to bury the gold. In the heat of the summer, he hired a pilot named Red Moiser to make several covert flights into the New Mexico desert for Trabuco.

It is believed that Trabuco chose a sparsely populated region near the Ute and Navajo Indian Reservations in New Mexico. Moiser allegedly made sixteen flights, carrying one ton of gold each time, taking them to pick-up trucks that transported them to burial site. Trabuco never revealed the location and was careful not to create a map. When the Gold Reserve Act of 1934 passed, the price of gold soared, but instead they waited for prices to soar higher.

Unfortunately, the Gold Act of 1934 made private ownership of gold illegal, and Trabuco was unable to cash in on his scheme. Over the years, he and his partners all died untimely deaths. Trabuco took the location of the gold to the grave.

Treasure hunter Ed Foster has searched for Trabuco’s Treasure in the desert around Farmington, New Mexico for over thirty-five years. He is convinced that he found the 1933 landing strip used by Red Moiser at a plateau called Conger Mesa. He has spoken with an Native American lady and Navajo woman who was six years old in 1933 who both recalled a plane that would land and take-off from there. Ed said she remembered several Mexican men who lived on the Reservation.

He also found an old Navajo home unlike any other on the reservation about twenty miles west of the mesa. It was probably meant as a guard post to guard the gold. It is a Mexican-style structure with windows, a front door, a back door and a veranda. Not far away is Shrine Rock inscribed with a date and the words: “1933 16 Ton.” Ed believes the gold could be hidden away somewhere in the vicinity of these three points.
Treasure hunter Norman Scott believes Trabuco’s Treasure has an air of authenticity to it. He believes that with available technology, it is only a matter of time before it is discovered.

It is believed that the treasure consisted of Mexican gold bought by several millionaires.

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Categories: gold, gold coins, gold ingots, hidden, Legends, Lost gold, Mexico, Old West, Treasure Hunters, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Prospector and Shooters……


S/W Shooter Supplies and Prospecting located in Cordova,Illinois is a multi line dealer of metal detectors including MINELAB, Deus XP, and Garrett metal detectors. WE are a multi line dealer of accessories including Lesche tools, Samson tools, RnB batteries, NEL coils (soon) waiting on initial orders for this high demand coil, Pinpointers, and lot of other accessories. WE carry Angus Mackirk recreational sluices,dredge and gold recovery products. WE are located in 4 locations accross the Midwest and in California with Minelab  and Garrett equipment. We use what is proven and sell the same,we work hard to help our customers succeed in the field where it counts the most.Check us out on S/W Detectors.com, R & R Sports, A.I.P. Mining supplies and S/W Shooters and Prospectors on Facebook.

 

For the convenience of our customers, S/W Mining offers regional stocking representatives for customers outside of our immediate area.
Customers located in Central IllinoisSoutheast Iowa, and Northeast Missouri: Contact Scott Ragar at 319-795-1201!
Customers located in the West Coast area: Contact Joey Wilson (ofAdventures in Prospecting fame). Give him a call at 760-936-3543!

http://www.swdetectors.com/

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Search for buried treasure: The mystery of millions in lost Confederate gold….


In April 1865, the Civil War ended for most Americans; however, the War and its various aspects continue to capture the interest and imagination of many Americans, who are fascinated by the conflict.
One of the big mysteries remaining is “what happened to the Confederate treasury” or “Confederate gold” that went missing during and after the American Civil War. For years, treasure hunters and historians have tried to solve this mystery, without too much luck.
Millions of dollars in gold was said to have been lost during and after the Civil War – buried by individual plantation owners and others, and even by the confederate government, to keep it out of the hands of the “damn Yankees.” In fact, $30 million dollars may have been buried outside of Savannah, Georgia, hidden for the day when the “South would rise again,” or so that the Union would not gain possession of it. Some of it just “went missing.”

One version of the story tells how Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederate States of America, was attending church in Richmond, Virginia, on Sunday, April 2, 1865, when he learned that Lee’s defensive line at Petersburg had been broken and the evacuation of Richmond was imminent. President Davis pleaded with General Lee to form defense lines for just one more day. He then informed his cabinet that Richmond was to be evacuated and they would take the Confederate treasury with them. Lee advised Davis that he had until 8 p.m. to load the gold, valuables, and cabinet members onto two trains that would travel south on the only line still open. Confederate officials boarded the first train, while the second train carried a “special cargo” comprised of gold ingots, gold double eagle coins, silver coins, silver bricks and Mexican silver dollars.
When the train tracks ended, Davis and his staff traveled south on horseback. The treasure, placed into containers once used for sugar, coffee, flour, and ammunition, was loaded into in wagons for the trip to the old US Mint in Charlotte, North Carolina. However, somewhere in Wilkes County, Georgia, the wagon train was bushwhacked by stragglers from the Federal and Confederate armies, who had heard of the treasure. Residents of Wilkes County who witnessed the event said that the bushwhackers waded knee-deep in gold and silver coinage before loading it in all kinds of bags and sacks and riding away.
The belief that Confederate gold is buried in Wilkes County has persisted since the end of the war. However, searches conducted throughout the years have found nothing of value there.
Some of the Confederate treasures reportedly buried in light of Union take over were:
$30 Million in gold buried outside of Savannah, Georgia, a hub of minting, trading, and gold mining before it fell to Union forces. The rumor is that the gold was buried under the name of a confederate general between two false generals in a cemetery.
$500,000 in Confederate Gold bullion is said to be located in West Central Broward County, allegedly buried by Captain John Riley, who planned to have it shipped to Cuba but was being pursued by Union soldiers, and so he buried it.
$100,000 in Confederate gold went missing in Georgia in 1865, when two wagon trains filled with gold were robbed at Chennault Crossroads in Lincoln County. There are different theories about what happened to the gold. Apparently, it never left the county, and after heavy rains, many gold coins have been found along the road to Chennault Plantation.
Another treasure tale about hidden Confederate gold has the Confederacy moving money to Columbia, Tennessee. By all accounts, $100,000 in gold and silver coins was being transported by wagon in two wooden crates. As the men transporting the money neared Athens, Alabama, the wagon became stuck in a muddy “bog hole.” As they tried to free the wagon, they were warned that Union soldiers were on the way. Afraid that the money would fall into Union hands, the men buried the crates of gold and silver about a half mile west of an old stream crossing, about four miles north of Athens, Alabama in Limestone County. And as the story goes, the coins have never been recovered.
Canada may also hold millions in Confederate gold. Southern spies preparing for a Confederate resurgence after the Civil War are said to have buried millions of dollars in gold at sites across Canada in the 1860s. Canada was an important haven for Confederate operatives during the Civil War, who went on to form the nucleus of a secret society — the Knights of the Golden Circle — that kept the South’s dream of independence alive for decades after the Union army’s victory.
By war’s end, exiled Confederates and Knights of the Golden Circle operating out of Canada had amassed a treasury estimated to be more than $2 million in gold and silver coins. Because of the strict secrecy surrounding the cash reserves and the generations that have passed since the money was buried, no one can for say for sure where the treasure is.
So whether the treasure was squirreled away for the day when the “South would rise again,” or simply hidden or lost, the fact remains there may be a fortune in Confederate gold buried across not only a dozen states in the South, but in Canada as well.

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More Ghost Town and Legends….Texas


GHOST TOWNS AND LEGENDS..TEXAS

PALO PINTO COUNTY

GHOST TOWNS

1…Pickwick…9 miles West of Graford
2…Salesville…on railroad, 8 miles North of Mineral Wells
3…Brad…11 miles North of Strawn
4…Posideon…8 miles North of Gordon
5…Lone Camp…5 miles South of South Palo Pinto
6…Bennetts…on railroad and East county line, 21 miles Southwest of Weather
7…Brazos…on railroad, 5 miles Northeast of Santo
8…Judd…on railroad, at South county line, 5 miles East of Gordon.

LEGENDS

1. M.L.Dalton was a cattle rancher who buried his wealth ($44,000 in gold coins) somewhere on his ranch
which was located near present day Palo Pinto. He was killed in an Indian attack and the family never
found the cache…

PARKER COUNTY

GHOST TOWNS

1…Advance…3 miles South of Poolville
2…Reno…3 miles West Northwest of Azle
3…Veal’s Station…9 miles North of Weatherford on Hwy 51, then 1 mile off the main road.
4…Rock Creek…on railroad and West county line, 4 miles East of Mineral Wells
5…Millsap…on railroad, 13 miles West Southwest of Weatherford
6…Lambert…on railroad, 9 miles West Southwest of Weatherford
7…Earls…on railroad, 5 miles East of Weatherford
8…Anneta…on railroad, 3 1/2 miles West of Aledo
9…Brock…10 miles South Southwest of Weatherford
10..Buckner, on South county line, 15 miles South Southwest of Weatherford

LEGENDS

1…In the area of Skeen’s Peak near Springtown, the outlaw Sam Bass buried a cache of $20 gold coins that was
stolen from the Union Pacific railroad robbery in Big Springs, Nebraska
2…Numerous cache’s are reported buried on the outskirts of Old Weatherford, as it was a stomping grounds for
outlaws and the Spanish crossed through it with gold laden caravans.
3…In the 1930’s a CCC camp was located near the old Curtis Diggings
4…NOTE:…deposits of gold (up to 6 oz per ton) have been found near the ghost town of Brock….

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HVAC installers find $300k in gold dust…….


SACRAMENTO, Nov. 22 (UPI) — A California heating, ventilation and air conditioning company said workers found $300,000 worth of gold dust during an installation at an older home.

Steve Ottley of Clark & Rush said he and his partner were conducting an HVAC installation in September at the home in Sacramento when they stumbled upon 12 baby food jars filled with gold dust, KOVR-TV, Sacramento, reported Thursday.

“I still can’t believe it today,” Ottley said of the discovery. “It’s unreal. We kind of just looked at each other and said ‘wow’.'”

The gold was given to the homeowners, who asked that their names not be reported.

Clark & Rush said workers conducting an installation in the 1980s discovered about $25,000 worth of gold coins in a home.

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Lost Treasure in Arizona…..


It has been estimated, by knowledgeable people, that there is enough information in Arizona concerning what we call treasure and ghost towns to fill half-a-dozen books. Arizona also had more than its share of blood and thunder daysthe stuff of which treasure legends are born. Hostile Indians raided its ranches and mining camps, carrying away and concealing treasures they had little use for but wanted to deny the white man. Outlaws preyed upon the bullion trains packing gold and silver from the mines, ambushing stages carrying Wells Fargo chests, and held up passenger trains as they stopped for water at lonely tank stations. Many of the treasures seized by these bandits were cached for recovery at a later date, which for some reason or another, never arrived.

The earliest known treasure hunt in the United States was in what is now called Arizona. In 1539 Fray Marcos de Niza was sent by the Spanish governor of New Spain to check on reports made by Indians of large cities of great wealth to the north. This journey triggered a hunt for precious minerals that is still going on in the Grand Canyon state.

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When a meteor crashed on the Coconio Plateau near Winslow, Arizona, an estimated 22,000 years ago, it created a crater 4,000 feet across and 570 feet deep which scattered fragments over an area two and a half miles in diameter. It is believed that the main body of the meteor, perhaps a mile deep, may be worth as much as $20,000,000 because of the many diamonds it might contain.

Dolph Cannon, a mysterious character who lived the life of a recluse in the caves of Canyon Diablo, spent many years gathering meteor fragments, breaking them apart and extracting the tiny diamonds. When he appeared in Winslow on frequent trading trips, he always carried a large roll of bills. Some thought this money was secured from selling the diamonds he had recovered. However, some believed he had entered the country with a supply of money which he kept cached in one of the caves.

One day Cannon disappeared and was never seen again in his canyon haunts. It was speculated that he had accumulated a fortune in diamonds and had left the country. But some ten years later it was learned that he had been murdered, supposedly by someone attempting to force him to tell where his accumulation of meteor diamonds was cached. Many subsequent searches of Canyon Diablo revealed the caves in which the recluse had lived, but no diamonds or cash have ever been reported found.

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In the early 1870s, a troop of soldiers from Fort Tucson were engaged in chasing a band of Apaches toward the Mexican border. If the Indians succeeded in crossing over into Mexico, they could not be brought back to their reservation, so, in spite of the terrific heat, the soldiers pressed hard to overtake them.

Somewhere in the Baboquivari Mountains the troops were brought to a halt in a small canyon where a pool of cool water had collected at the foot of a rocky ledge. A second pool was found near the first and the men split into two groups so that they could all gather around the welcome water. As one of the soldiers knelt to fill his canteen, he noticed that the bottom of the pool was covered with bright shining pebbles. He scooped up a handful and showed them to his companions. Someone recognized the pebbles as gold nuggets and there was a wild scramble to fill their pockets. More nuggets were found along the ledge and the men, forgetting their tiredness, rushed madly to gather as many as they could find before ordered to resume the chase.

When the officer in charge gave the command to mount, several of the men expressed their desire to abandon the chase and collect the gold. But the order stood and their request was denied. As the soldiers rode away, the men tried to locate the landmarks in their minds so that they could return at a later date. But in a country where all the landscape looks remarkably similar, it takes an extremely experienced man to retrace his steps weeks or months later.

Eventually the fleeing Indians were headed off, captured, and returned to Tucson. The soldiers, however, did not forget the gold. Some asked to be discharged, but they were denied. Two of the more determined deserted, stole mounts, and rode away to the south. They eventually found the ledge, but the water in the pools they depended upon had dried up. Nevertheless, they gathered all the gold they could carry, and loaded their horses so heavily that they were forced to walk and lead the animals. Before long, the extreme heat began to take its toll, and they had to lighten their animals burdens. Time and time again they discarded some of the gold. One of the horses fell and could not rise, and before long the second horse dropped of thirst and exhaustion.

When a search party found the deserters, one was dead, and the other was in a dying condition. Before death claimed him, he managed to gasp out an account of their experiences. It is said that several of the men who had seen the gold in the tanks in the Baboquivari Mountains made several searches after they were discharged from the army. If any ever found it, the news was kept a secret.

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This story was given to me by Thomas Penfield (deceased) who wrote the book A Guide to Treasure in Arizona.

One of the first Mexican families to follow Father Eusebio Kino northward into Primeria Alta was the Valverdes. They settled in the Santa Cruz Valley in the vicinity of Guevavi Mission (now only a mound of rubble, but its site can be located). With their ranch established, the Valverdes took to the surrounding mountains in search of the gold which they knew the Indians secured. They found it at some spot lost to history and developed a rich mine. Employing Indian laborers, the Valverde mine produced enough gold each year that a large pack train was required to carry it out to Mexico. The Valverdes prospered immensely, and to store the wealth for their mine between pack trains to Mexico, they built a stone vault under the main house of the ranch.

Stinging under the harsh treatment of their Spanish masters, the Indians of Primeria Alta rose in revolt in 1772, destroyed the missions and ranches, and killed all white men who did not flee their wrath. Among the families managing to escape to Mexico were the Valverdes, but they had to leave behind their horses and cattle, and about a years accumulation of gold.

Wealthy from the gold they had already sent to Mexico, the Valverdes never returned to Arizona. In time, all traces of the ranch were reduced to rubble, and today not even a low mound remains to indicate its site, which is probably overgrown with mesquite and cottonwood trees.

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This little-known location of a large cache of gold in southern Pima County could very well be worth searching for.

In 1873, a Mexican prospector named Pedro Pedrillo found a crude rock cross bearing, in Spanish, the instructions dig here. This was on the eastern slope of the Cocopah Mountain range. Pedro dug up a tin box which contained a scroll with this story.

On March 19, 1682, the Spanish ship ISABELLE CATOLICA wrecked off the coast of California. Captain Jesus Arroa and his crew of twenty-five men, with tools and weapons, started traveling east. They came to what is now the Cocopah Mountain range. Here they found placer gold and spent eight months collecting it. They planned to try to get to Mexico City with what gold they could carry, but, unfortunately, Indians attacked the party while they were still mining.

A battle of two days convinced Captain Arroa that they would all be killed. He thereupon wrote directions to where the gold that had been mined could be found, then made a cross and buried the instructions beneath it. None of the ships crew is known to have escaped the Indians.

In 1874, Pedro Pedrillo organized a search party to go to the Cocopah Mountain range. After several weeks of unsuccessful searching, the party gave up. To the best of known records, the gold has not been found. With modern equipment, a good prospector has a chance of finding this cache. The location is in the Papago Indian Reservation. Permission to search will have to be obtained from the tribal council.

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Although this story of a treasure site near Red Rock in Pinal County is part legend and part fact, it is still worth investigating by an interested person.

FACTAccording to an old newspaper clipping which I have, around the year 1910 near Red Rock, several Papago Indian children found some old rusty pearl heads, swords and tools. They were identified as being of early Spanish origin. These artifacts were still in the University of Arizona in 1978.

LEGENDA traditional story among the Papago Indians is that, over four hundred years ago, a group of men with white skin and blue eyes came to this area and lived with the Papagos on a large ranch that they, with the help of the Indians, built. All were eventually killed by the enemies of this Indian tribe. During their stay the strangers explained to the Indians their desire for yellow metal. Over the years a large quantity of gold was collected and concealed somewhere along an old trail, in a southwesterly direction, between present day Red Rock, and Silver Bell, Arizona.

It could very well pay a treasure hunter to learn exactly where the Spanish artifacts were found and also try to locate the old ranch site and the ancient road. Since all the white men were killed, the gold has still to be hidden somewhere in the area.

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I pass this brief bit of information on so that anyone who might be interested can investigate it further. This quote by an Indian in 1960 is taken from a letter sent to me by a man still living in Arizona. (His name withheld by request.)

Long time ago, even before my great-great-grandfathers time, Apache hide many loads of yellow metal in tunnel on banks of Gila, about San Pedro River. They dig big tunnel, put in clay, then big pile of yellow pebbles. They bring pebbles from many places far away so hated iron-hats (Spanish) not find. They put more yellow metal in hole on burial grounds long way up Gila on north side. Iron hats not find yellow pebbles, them still there.

If this information is correct, then the tunnel location and the burial grounds are between Hayden and Christmas, Arizona, on the northeast side of the Gila River.

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In 1872, a stagecoach on its way from Prescott to Ft. Mohave, Arizona, was robbed of $72,000 by two men near Canyon Station, located about twelve miles from Kingman, on the Stockton Hill Road in Mohave County.

The story is that one of the robbers was killed by a sheriffs posse. The second one was captured and sent to prison, where he died years later. Several attempts to find the money, which it was later learned had been buried near the holdup site, were unsuccessful.

In 1935, a man named Goodwill owned the property where the original station stood. One summer day he saw an old man searching around the foundations of the old station. When he approached, the man told Goodwill that he had been in prison with an old man in the 1890s, who told him that he was one of the robbers and that the money had been buried near the station.

The man was given permission to search, but after several days he told Goodwill that the area had changed, and he could not find any of the landmarks that the old robber had told him to locate.

While many have searched, it appears that the $72,000 is still hidden near the old Canyon Station Stage Stop.

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This story of a lost cache of gold bullion, worth approximately $125,000, is unusual in that the landmarks have been found but the additional symbol telling the exact location of the cache has not.

The story of a hijacked load of gold bullion brought from Mexico to Arizona was told in the area of Safford, Arizona, for over ninety years before in 1903, when a man named George Swift discovered a triangle made of granite rocks at Snow Flat, on Mount Graham. At the time he found the triangle, Swift did not know the legend of the hijacked bullion.

When he learned the story, Swift returned to the triangle. As he knew the age of trees could be determined by the growth rings, he cut down a tree within the triangle and counted the rings, thus determining that the rocks had been placed there about 1830, the correct time period when the bullion had been hijacked. He then dug down several feet in the center of the triangle but found nothing.

After excavating in several different places, Swift decided that there had to be another marker signifying the exact position of the bullion, but search as he might, he was never able to locate the additional symbol.

According to several books I have on treasure symbols, the practice of putting more than one mark indicating a treasure site was quite common among the Spanish, French, and Indians when they concealed valuables.

The mystery of the triangle has never been solved. The odds are good that somewhere in Snow Flat, on Mount Graham, a fortune in gold bullion waits for someone who can locate a marker indicating this cache.

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In April of 1884, Garvin Harmon of Boston hired a French scout named Jean Bouche to explore the eastern reaches of Arizona as part of an investment venture. Harmons plan was to acquire prime valley land that would later be the site of towns, railroad rights-of- way, good rangeland, and might contain valuable mineral deposits.

Bouche traveled the southeastern portion of Arizona until late May, and then headed north for Jaajo country. One day as he was riding along in an especially rugged region he heard low moans. He followed the sounds to the edge of a deep, narrow arroyo.

Below, in the arroyo, lay a badly injured youth. Bouche scrambled down the rocks, carrying his canteen and a rope. He first offered the youth water, and then checked the extent of his injuries. The Indian had tumbled into the cleft and broken his left thigh and left collarbone.

Bouche made a crude splint for the youths leg, and then carried him down the arroyo until he could climb out with his burden. The Frenchman fashioned a sled, or travois, from nearby branches and his horse blanket, and pulled the wounded Indian a few miles beyond the arroyo. Below he could see the squat hogans of a Navajo village, so he headed over towards the village.

As Bouche rode in, Indians gathered around the travois and carried the boy to a large Hogan in the center of the village. Others took Bouche away to another hut and kept him prisoner for a number of days. Bouche could speak a little of the Navajo dialect, but no one would speak to him.

About a week later the Frenchman was brought from his hut and learned what had happened. The boy was the son of the chief. Because of Bouches merciful actions, he was now recovering nicely. The chief told Bouche he wished to repay him for his kindness.

A small band of Indians was assembled, and Bouche was blindfolded. He was helped onto his horse, and the party rode off and was later told to dismount. With the Indians guiding him, he climbed a long slope.

Finally, the ground leveled off, and Bouche felt the sudden coolness of shade. He smelled a dank, musty odor. When his blindfold was removed, he found himself in a cave, and what a cave it was!

The walls were heavily braided with veins of gold. The chief handed Bouche a large hide sack and told him to fill it with gold. When the sack was full, the Frenchman was again blindfolded. He was led back to his horse, the party returned to the village, and there he was released.

The chief again thanked Bouche for his kindness, but warned him that the debt he owed the Frenchman had now been paid in full. Bouche was warned never to return to find the cave of gold or he would be killed.

The Frenchman rode westward, spreading his tale as he went and showing the chunks of gold he had recovered form the cave. Though Bouche kept his word and never entered Navajo territory again, others did. But to the best of anyones knowledge, no one ever found the cave.

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Charles Tully was one of those lucky people you hear about. When Estevan Ochoa needed cash to expand his business in 1863, Tully was taken in as a partner, and the Tully and Ochoa Freight Company became the most successful freighting company in the southwest.

From Kansas City, Tully and Ochoa wagons rumbled westward carrying freight over the Santa Fe Trail and on into Arizona. They acquired government contracts to carry freight to army posts and Indian reservations throughout southern Arizona.

Both Tully and Ochoa amassed sizeable fortunes form their freight company. In addition, Tully ran a successful cattle spread along the San Luis wash, just above the Mexican border, roughly a dozen miles southwest of what is now Arivaca, Arizona.

Tully kept his money close at hand, hidden somewhere near his ranch-house. When he died, Tullys wealth was known to have amounted to $70,000 or more, but it could not be found. Wherever he hid his money, Tully did a good job of it, for many have looked for his fortune but no one has unearthed it.

Tullys daughter returned to the crumbling adobe ruins of the old ranch, some said to hunt for the money. But as far as it is known, the treasure is still where Tully hid it long ago.

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In June of 1928, Earl Nelson and a man named Forrester robbed a bank in Clarkdale, Arizona. Forrester was killed during the getaway, and Nelson was captured and jailed, but he soon escaped. When recaptured later, he admitted he was trying to reach Stoneman Lake, a town about 45 miles south of Flagstaff, Arizona. Nelson said he and Forrester had hidden several thousand dollars from a previous crime near the town.

Treasure hunters of that era scoured the Stoneman Lake area, but as far as it is known, the loot was never found. An added inducement for modern treasure hunters is the fact that Stoneman Lake was a favorite campsite on the military trail between Fort Apache and various other forts to the west.

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The Heintzelman mine, southwest of Tucson, Arizona, seemed cursed from the day fifteen men were buried in a cave-in. There was no way to recover the bodies and the other miners felt the mine was haunted.

Indian attacks caused many of the miners to quit. Although mine manager John Poston had an additional problem: his Mexican miners were robbing him blind. Finally, in a desperate act designed to halt the theft, Poston executed his foreman, Juanito, when he caught him trying to smuggle out a load of silver bullion.

But the cold-blooded act backfired. Instead of cutting down on the stealing as Poston had hoped, the killing of Juanito caused even more Mexicans to desert, and as they left they stole everything they could carry off.

The miners carried with them to Mexico the assertion that the stolen silver Juanito had been caught with was only a small part of the bullion he had buried near the mine. They said his hidden cache was worth $70,000.

Was the story of Juanitos buried treasure true? There were outlaws in Mexico who believed it. For all their prying and hunting, the Mexican outlaw did not find Juanitos silver. If Juanitos buried it near the Heintzelman Mine, then it must still be there today.

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A hot summer wind blew along the railroad track as Walter Swan made his way toward the station house at Bisbee Junction. He had a part-time job handling freight for the railroad.

Topping a rise, he looked across the valley toward the depot. Something strange was happening. The train was halted at the station and several men on horseback appeared to be milling around the freight car.

A robbery was in progress. Five men with drawn guns were demanding that the guard surrender his shipment of payroll cash intended for the nearby Copper-Queen Mine at Bisbee. After a brief shouted conversation, one of the bandits fired, hitting the guard in the stomach.

Crumbling inside the car, the man cried, Oh my God, boys, you dont know what you have just done. This will follow you all the rest of your lives. As the man lay bleeding, an argument ensued around the thieves.

Crawling closer for a better look, Swan caught snatches of the conversation. I told you, no shooting, one of the bandits said, firing his pistol at the offender. The victim dropped from his saddle, dead. Horrified, Swan started to crawl away, fearful that his presence would spell death for him as well.

As he did so, another volley of shots rang out and a second bandit fell from his horse. Swan rolled into a nearby ditch and crawled to safety. Within minutes of the shootings, the remaining bandits had gathered as much loot as their horses could conveniently manage, and rode off toward Tombstone, a distance of some 30 miles.

With barely time for an investigation, the Bisbee Sheriff mounted a posse of enraged ranchers and miners, and followed in the direction of the fleeing criminals. Even though the posse rode for almost two days, no signs of the bandits were found.

The search widened and spread across the state, but the thieves had made good their escape. It wasnt until almost two years later that the remains of one of the holdup men was found a days ride from Bisbee Junction, and he had been shot in the head.

It appeared that a dispute over the distribution of the loot had ended with the killing of the third bandit. This left two men with three horses to carry the heavy gold shipment of several thousand dollars, enough to pay the salaries of miners at the Copper-Queen. While records of this incident are vague, it now seems apparent that more than $11,000 was involved, most of it in gold coins, which was a heavy commodity to carry on horseback.

Many have wondered about the loot and its final disposition. It is possible the last two bandits made good their escape and took all the money. This now seems a remote possibility. The amount of gold involved was too heavy for five horses to make much time with, especially if they also carried riders.

When the three bandits left the Junction, they had only one horse apiece, and these were being forced to the limit. Plus, they were carrying the heavy sacks of gold coins and paper currency. How far could they have gone before the animals became winded? Possibly five or eight miles?

No one answering the description of the bandits was seen in Tombstone or Benson, so the men must have bypassed this population center. It was certainly impossibly to carry all the money. It would have attracted too much attention, and would have been too heavy for a horse and rider to handle. The money, or at least some of it, probably lies buried less than 50 miles from present-day Bisbee.

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Somewhere, thirty miles south-east from Salome, is a rich red clay ledge of gold.

A rancher in his pick-up truck was looking after his cattle when he was suddenly attracted to a red clay ledge not often found in that area. He got out of his vehicle and examined the surface of the ledge closely. Although not experienced in prospecting for gold, he noticed shining particles in the clay. It was gold! He loaded enough of the red clay on his truck for panning and drove home. At home, he contacted an old friend and prospector to find out what he thought about the gold in the red clay samples.

The panning of the dirt brought enough gold to easily see that the rancher had found a real bonanza.

The rancher and his friend made plans for going back to the red clay gold deposit. In the meantime the rancher had to make a trop to Colorado to close a land deal. Unfortunately, he died of a heart attack while gone and left his friend without the disclosure of the exact location of the ledge of gold.

All of this happened just a few years ago, hence the facts are quite fresh and accurate in the minds of the people who know about it. The prospector-friend of the deceased rancher made attempts to locate the gold, but no other information is available.

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One tale, little known by treasure enthusiasts, is told by the residents of Patagonia, in Santa Cruz County, Arizona.

About eight miles west of town and well into the mountainous terrain, an ancient trail can be found. It is obvious that it was built and used during the Spanish days. Its antiquity cannot be doubted nor can its long disuse, for very old oak trees now grow in the trail. The best conclusions which can be drawn today would indicate that the trail led from San Xavier del Bac (the old mission) toward California or outlying missions in the same general area.

Many years ago, an ex-soldier started digging a tunnel into one of the many cliffs which dot the area near the trail. He was a Negro and at first the occasional ranchers who ran across him believed he was mining.

Their curiosity aroused, cowboys who frequently rode though the area often stopped to see him. One day the Negro saw a mountain goat near the tunnel. Probably fascinated at what the man was doing, the goat showed now fear and stared silently at the Negro. A superstitious man, he picked up his rifle and killed the animal. Later he told the cowboys that the goat was a Spanish priest in disguise who had come to spy on him. He further related that the padres ghost was guarding a treasure that had been buried here.

As the months passed, the Negros behavior became more and more erratic. The ranchers became worried, believing that someday the man might shoot a cowboy under the delusion he was a Spanish ghost. Several of them went up to the Negros shack to bring him back to civilization for medical treatment. When they tried this, the Negro became violent and attacked one of the group with a butcher knife. The rancher pulled his gun and apparently the Negro was killed accidentally or in self defense. The place where the shooting occurred has since been known as Camp Loco and is on the ancient trail.

The story grew into a local legend. Many years ago, it tells, a mule train of Padres and Indians came over the trail and buried treasure to protect it from enemies. At the bottom of a high precipice they built a room of rocks and secreted their valuables here.

High on the cliff they dug a tunnel and filled it with lime which was used to blast off the face of the cliff. Hundreds of tons of rock and earth tumbled down on the rock house, burying it forever.

There are three signs which are positive proof of where the treasure is buried. On the east side of the canyon is a sheer cliff into which is carved a huge butterfly. It is unmistakable, with wings, antenna and head. The head is pointed toward the treasure cliff. The treasure site is in a little canyon; on one side is a tall, thin rock formation which, if imagination is used, will resemble a man standing with one arm stretched upward. The head of this formation also points toward the treasure. Still a third clue exists in the form of a huge rock which resembles a mans hand. This figure also points toward the treasure.

Several times in the last half century each of these representations have been sighted by travelers in the area. Unlike the legend, however, all three have not been located together, and no treasure has been found.

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William Harrison Hardy, riverboat captain, merchant, prospector, miner, member of the Arizona Territorial legislature and county supervisor, started his lifes adventure on the Colorado in 1864.

In this story, one prospecting trip was described by Hardy. It was published in the paper, Phoenix Graphic, in 1899. It is about a mountain of silver.

This story of William Hardy starts on the morning of May 10, 1866, when he was sitting in front of his house in Hardyville. A team of wagons from California had just crossed the river, naturally on the ferry operated by Hardy. He started his story this way:

A middle-aged man rode up to the house. He was mounted on a small horse and a pack-mule followed. I invited him to stop and eat dinner. As soon as dinner was over, the man went to the corral and petted his animals. Toward the evening, he got out of his pack an old greasy sack and asked me to take a walk. The prospector, for such he was, took his sack of ore, and we went out behind the corral. He looked in every direction to see if anyone was near to hear our talk. We sat down on the ground and began to show me his find. He first showed me some lead ore and said he found it near the canyon of the Colorado.

The man then took out of the sack some silver ore that was at least half pure metal. He said this came from a mountain to the north, towards the mouth of the Little Colorado River, and the whole mountain was of such silver ore.

Hardy continued his story:

The sight of this silver ore got to me, and I was in for a trip to find it. I told the prospector that I would wait until morning. I then picked out two men. I told them the story, and they were in for the trip at once. I consulted the latest maps and found that all the country north of us was unexplored, and at least 500 miles of the Colorado River was not located on the maps. We were determined to explore it.

I set to work the next morning. We had six mules and one horse, three of the mules were packed with kegs, so as to pack water if need be and started out early. The third day out we reached Peach Springs, about 80 miles form the start. This was as far as we had knowledge of the country. Here we found a half-breed Indian and Mexican, who knew the country and would guide us.

About 4 oclock in the afternoon we reached a small spring, afterwards called Pine Springs. The next morning we got off early, as our guide said it was a long way to water, and we reach it by 5 oclock.

At daybreak all hands were up. A half mile along the foot of the mountain we found a tank of water. Here we camped and decided to prospect three days. I climbed to the top of the mountain, and with field grass I could see the banks of the Little Colorado River for many miles to the east as well as the banks of the Colorado River.

With his companions, Hardy prospected, using hammers, drills, and even powder. However, this mountain failed to be the mountain of silver the prospector had told him about. Suddenly, they had a feeling of being followed by Indians so they turned back.

Now Hardy knew that they had made the right decision, not to proceed in their search for the mountain of silver. Hardy came to the end of his story:

At this point, five Indians appeared who had been following the mules. We took a shot at them. Two of them fell, and the others ran back. We kept right on course, and four days later reached home.

After this prospecting adventure in searching for the mountain of silver, Hardy lost his interest in long trips. The mountain of silver, somewhere toward the mouth of the Little Colorado River, remains undiscovered.

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The following is the story of Precillano Ruiz, his gold and silver mine, his murder in 1889, and his fortune of $50,000 in gold and silver which still lies hidden in a cache.

Precillano Ruiz and his brother, Agustin, were placer miners and prospectors residing near old Tucson, Arizona, during the early settlement of that area. The Ruiz brothers were well respected citizens around Tucson and in the San Pedro Valley. It is known that Precillano Ruiz had made several visits to his home in Sonora, before and after the death of his brother, displaying large buckskin sacks filled with gold, claiming his discovery was made near Wickenburg. Suddenly, Precillano mysteriously disappeared and residents in the Wickenburg area assumed he had been killed while returning from Wickenburg to his claim.

Later, an article in a newspaper stated that a Mexican camping near the Slim Jim Gulch had been murdered. Information was learned that proved that the murdered man was actually Precillano. At the same time this murder came to light, it was also learned that Precillano had extracted and accumulated gold and silver in the amount of $50,000, which, for safety reasons, he kept hidden in a cache in or near his mine. Later events lead to the belief that Precillano had been murdered to gain possession of his valuable mine.

There is no evidence to this day that this fortune has been found. The area where Precillano Ruiz left his cache of gold and silver is in the immediate location of many rich discoveries of precious metals.

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In 1882 the railroad construction reached the Kingman area and pushed ahead toward Topock, on the Colorado River. Hundreds of people worked for the railroad, living in a camp. This camp was moved from place to place as miles of the new railroad bed were completed.

At the time of the robbery, the railroad camp was located at the present town of Yucca, which became one of the railroad stations. The railroad workers were paid in coin every few months, and naturally the payroll day was known not only to the workers, but to the people living in the area.

A gang of three men executed a daring and successful robbery of the payroll money. These men had lived in the area for some time and one of them had made his residence at the La Cienega station in hopes of eluding the posse in pursuit. The other two robbers made a getaway in the opposite direction, and their trail was lost by the posse.

The man with the loot was attempting to reach his home at La Cienega, hide the money, then play cool, pretending to know nothing about the robbery. Somehow, the posse found his trail and even picked up a few coins he had dropped along the trail to La Cienega.

The man had enough time to get to La Cienega and hide the loot. However, he was caught nearby the posse on the way to La Castaneda Wells station and brought back to the adobe station building. The posse questioned him about the loot which was not found when he was caught. They confronted him with coins found on the road very close to La Cienega station. The posse very likely used physical persuasion, and finally the robber confessed that he had hidden the loot in the kitchen. The preliminary search for the loot proved to be unsuccessful. The posse then took the robber back to Yucca.

On the way the robber tried to make an escape but was killed during his brief attempt to gain freedom. This robber was the only one who knew the exact location of the hidden payroll. He was expecting to join his two companions later and divide the loot.

The payroll money remains hidden near or at the La Cienega station. The kitchen was torn apart, and the floor area dug six feet deep, but no money was ever found. It is believed that the robber did not have too much time to hide the loot, but he had lived at the La Cienega station for some time and knew the immediate area very well.

The ranch is still known as La Cienega Ranch, and sometimes it is called the Seventeen Mile Ranch, supposedly so because the distance to this station from the one at Yucca was seventeen miles. This payroll, as far as is known, has never been found.

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In Arizona Territory, rugged King Woolsey was a man to be reckoned with. In 1880, a party of men under the command of Woolsey, discovered a ledge of gold on Camp Creek, north of Phoenix. They had just been through a skirmish with a bunch of Apaches who had vanished suddenly. When they were sure that the danger was passed, the group of Indian fighters made camp in Squaw Hollow, about ten miles south of Bronco Canyon.

It wasnt long before a few seasoned prospectors in the group commented that it looked like a good country for prospecting, and the hunt was on. The group fanned out and started searching. One by one the men straggled back to camp empty handed, except for one excited man who carried his hat filled with hunks of gold-bearing quartz. It took a while before the man calmed down enough to say that there was a great deal of the ore in an exposed ledge.

The ore was passed around from man to man, and the gold fever was at a high pitch when one of the men noticed movement. It was the Apaches. They had only retreated in order to gather more warriors so they could sneak back and attack the Woolsey party with a stronger force. This time the whites were badly outnumbered and all thoughts of the rich, gold-bearing quartz were driven from their minds.

Once back in civilized country, the Indian fighters split up and went their separate ways, but to a man, they kept the existence of the gold ore a secret. One of the Indian fighters did return to the area of Squaw Hollow to hunt for the ledge of gold. It was only when he was sure that he couldnt locate it again that he made his story known, and since he was a reputable citizen, theres no reason to doubt what he told about the incident. The man was Judge J. T. Alsap, and his story begins when he felt that it was finally safe enough for him to venture into the Camp Creek country. He made a base camp at Creek and from there he roamed over the surrounding country, searching for the ledge of gold bearing quartz, however he was unable to find the gold.

An elderly shepherd, a number of years after Alsaps unsuccessful hunt for the ledge of gold, camped in Squaw Hollow while moving his flocks down from the higher mountains to the milder climate of the Salt River Valley. A prospector was working there, grinding ore by hand with pestle and mortar. It was a tedious process, but evidently a profitable one. In later years, the sheepherder crossed Squaw Hollow a number of times, but he never saw the prospector again. He did find the tailings, though, near where the prospector had ground the ore, but he had no idea where the prospector had obtained the ore.

Squaw Hollow is easily reached and is situated about 40 miles northeast of Phoenix. Its country which is heavily mineralized, so theres a chance of finding ore, but the land is also covered with dense thickets which are almost impossible to walk through. Camp Creek cuts its way across the land, with its beginning roughly 10 miles from Horseshoe Dam, emptying into the Verde River about four miles southwest of Bartlett Dam.

 

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Lost Treasure tales….Arkansas


Here is a lost silver mine in Arkansas which has not been found. It is a recorded fact that the Spanish had several silver mines during the early 1700s in what is now the state of Arkansas. One such mine was near the present community of Batavia in Boone County.

The Spanish worked the mine for several years but, due to Indian trouble, decided to conceal and abandon it. They planned to return when the area was more settled. Due to wars and the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, none of the descendants of the original Spanish miners ever attempted to relocate the silver mine.

In 1880, an old man who appeared to be Indian and Spanish, stopped at the general store near Batavia. Showing John Rea, the store’s owner, an old weathered map, the man described the local terrain and told Rea that he believed the old Spanish silver mine was located on “Pilot Knob,” a local landmark. If this was the location, there should be a stream one hundred yards southwest of the large rock on top of the mountain. Rea assured the old man that his description was correct.

The next day, Rea, his son and the old man went to Pilot Knob. After pacing off 200 yards north of the spring that formed the stream, the old man told Rea and his sons to dig. About six feet down the diggers came upon a cavity with a skeleton which had apparently been walled up in the cave.

Rea and his son staked mining claims on all of Pilot Knob. When, after several weeks of mining and tunneling was done, and no silver had been found, Rea and his son gave up the search and went back to their store. The aged Indian left, still convinced that Pilot Knob was the right area.

Today, very few people know of this location. But with the current price of silver, it could be worthwhile for someone to try to locate this lost silver mine.

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Black Cave, or Spanish Treasure Cave, as it is often called, is just off State Highway 59, between the towns of Gravette and Sulphur Springs in northwest Benton County, Arkansas. It is thought to be the location of a mine excavated by the Spaniards during one of their early expeditions to this region. The cave was in the side of a cliff, and near it stood a large oak tree on which was carved a map.

In the early 1900s, a strange Spaniard appeared in the county, claiming to have information about a treasure buried in the cave. Naming $3,000,000 as the value of the treasure, he interested a group of men who formed an exploration company. After examining the cave for about one mile and finding nothing, the search for the mysterious Spaniard’s gold was abandoned.

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When Hernando De Soto and his men left the Hot Springs area, they journeyed southward along the Ouachita River. On the way, the Spaniards met a party of friendly Ouachita Indians near what is now Camden. Noting the amulets and other ornaments of pure silver the Indians were wearing, De Soto demanded to know where the silver came from. The Indians shrewdly refused to disclose the source of the metal. De Soto ordered his men to search for the mine, especially along the Ouachita and its tributaries.

Old-time prospectors say that many years after De Soto’s death, a band of Spanish adventurers located the Indians’ mine and actually took silver from it, thus giving it the name of the Lost Spanish Mine. The Spaniards worked the mine for several years. Before returning to Mexico, they sealed its entrance with a huge rock and destroyed their crude smelting apparatus.

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In about 1900, an Indian who gave his age as the late 90s, came to Hot Springs seeking eleven mule-loads of gold. He was suffering from an illness of some type and got around with great difficulty. He said that his father, Running Horse, had told him that the gold had come from the Lost Indian Mine, which the Indians had recovered after the Spanish had abandoned it. The gold was said to have been taken away by the Indians and buried along the old Indian Trail between Hot Springs and Lick Skillet, now called Hollywood. So far as is known, the aged Indian died before he could make his find.

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Jesse and Frank James, Belle Starr and her husband Pony Starr, are said to have robbed a bank in Missouri of $34,000. Fleeing into northwestern Arkansas over the old Butterfield Stage route, they stopped at Shiloh, now called Springdale, and made camp nearby.

Several years later, an old woman appeared in Shiloh and spent some time at the spot, apparently picking berries. She confided to an acquaintance that she was really looking for a cave in a bluff flecked with reddish colored rock. She claimed the cave entrance was closed with a large rock on which was depicted the figure of an Indian head, and that another rock below the large rock bore the figure of a ladder. The $34,000 from the robbery was supposed to be buried in the cave. After several days of searching, without success, the old woman left and was never seen in the area again.

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Near Coweta Falls is a cave under a large rock bluff. Mounds found in the vicinity along with many arrowheads and other relics indicate that the place was once the site of a large Indian settlement, and legend says that the Indians buried a large amount of gold in the walls of the bluff. The history of the cave, recorded in pictographs on a deer hide, was once brought by an Indian to Harrison, the Boone County seat. Drawn on the deer hide were the falls, a spring, an Indian moccasin, a snake, and a pot of gold. The symbols are said to have duplicated those on the walls of the cave. The Indian was never able to locate the gold.

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Some time after the Civil War, John Avants homesteaded a piece of land along the Cosatot River north of De Queen. The area can be located by Avants Mountain, named for the pioneer settler. Some ten to twelve years later, a stranger came to Avant’s place and asked the assistance of the father and his several sons. The stranger was seeking a landmark, he said, near two springs close together. If he could locate the springs, he declared, they would lead him to a vast treasure. Father and sons all said that they were thoroughly familiar with the vicinity, but had never seen such a place as the stranger described.

Before departing in defeat, the stranger revealed that a party of Spaniards with seven jack loads of gold had once made camp near the two springs. Here they were attacked by Indians, and the Spaniards realized that they would have to dispose of their treasure if they were to escape with their lives. The gold, and one of the Spaniards who had been killed, were hastily buried. Then the Spaniards took flight, closely followed by the Indians. Only a few of them managed to escape to Mexico, where they told their story. One by one the survivors died or were killed before they could return and recover the gold.

It was two or three years after the stranger’s dejected departure that two of the Avants boys happened upon a pair of springs exactly as had been described to them. They found spikes driven into some of the trees and strange markings were carved on others. Not realizing the significance of the signs, they made no search for the treasure. Many years later, one of the Avants boys happened to relate the story of the stranger to a nephew, who immediately recalled that he had plowed up a skeleton near the two springs. A search was now made for the buried gold, but without success. Subsequent searches for the treasure have been made over the years, but all have failed.

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This little-known treasure location certainly warrants further investigation by an interested treasure hunter. I quote this verbatim from an old tabloid, printed in September 1966:

“Back in the 1880s, a wealthy man by the name of Edgar Mason lived in a deteriorated, shabby cabin about twenty miles east of Morrilton, Arkansas. It was commonly known that he was financially well off from an inheritance, but that he was seldom seen in town. Like many people in his day and time, he did not trust banks, and the rumor persisted that a fortune had been buried at or near his old cabin site.

“The only person who had any association with him was a ranch hand named Weaver. Mason grew to like and respect the quiet, mild-mannered Weaver. After some time, he revealed to Weaver the tragic ill fates and dealings with his fellow men which had left him angry and disillusioned with the human race.

“One afternoon Weaver went over to visit Mason and found him digging in the ground near his cabin. He told Weaver that he had buried a large amount of cash which he valued at $62,000 in gold and silver coins. Weaver helped him dig, but they did not find the money. For two years, the two men dug and labored in vain. Before long, Mason became very crippled and almost an invalid. He was forced to move to Missouri to live with a sister.

“Weaver continued to search for the coins, concentrating to the north of the cabin near a large group of trees where Mason said that he had dug a hole three feet deep and buried the coins in a wash tub. After several years the ranch hand gave up the search, and drifted out of the area.”

As far as can be determined, this cache has not been found.

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Several legends exist in Arkansas’ Ozark Mountains. Few have been written about, and most of them have been told by word of mouth to each succeeding generation over the years. One of the most interesting is the Spanish treasure of Mill Ford Hollow. Mill Ford is located at the upper end of Beaver Lake in northwest Arkansas, some five miles north of Goshen. The legend tells that a party of Spaniards came through what is now northwest Arkansas from the southwest, probably trying to reach the old Spanish Trail in Mississippi, then on to the Gulf Coast, where they could sail to Spain. The Indians of the area attacked the Spaniards and stole the several wagon loads of silver bars they were transporting. The bars were placed in the back entrance to a cave, and then the cave was sealed and camouflaged.

In 1835, because of white expansion, a treaty was made with the few Choctaw, Cherokee, and Osage Indians in the area to move west of the Arkansas boundary. It was at this time that the story of the hidden cave was learned by the white men.

As the Indians were being taken westward across the White River at the Mill Ford, an old Indian related the Spanish treasure legend to one of the white settlers who had befriended him. Since the Indian knew he could never return, he felt his friend should know the treasure story. Pointing to a large cave down river, one-quarter mile from the ford, he told of millions of dollars’ worth of silver bars that had been buried in the cave’s back entrance by his ancestors.

Today, there are no visible signs of an opening on the back side of the ridge, through which the cave originally had run.

The following incident lends credence to the story of the concealed cave. Some time during the 1890s, two men, whose names have been lost to history, were walking on an old timber road which once ran along the back side of the ridge near where it is believed the rear entrance to the treasure cave was concealed. Sticking out of the ground, near the road, were two large silver bars. Rain and erosion had exposed the bars which the men took to Fayetteville and had assayed.

The report showed them to be high in silver content. Since then, numerous searches have been made for the legendary back entrance of the cave. Although the front entrance can be seen on a bluff overlooking Beaver Lake, the hidden silver bars still await discovery.

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For those treasure hunters interested in old forts and towns that have disappeared, these two sites have almost certainly been overlooked.

Fort Desha in Desha County was believed to have been built by the French near the Mississippi River, as protection for a trading post which dealt mainly with Indians of the area. I quote this from the 1894 “12th Annual Report of American Ethnology”:

“Old Fort Desha had been square, measuring 150 yards from side to side. On the west side extends a grated or covered pathway a distance of 250 yards, ending near the former bank of the Mississippi River. The height of the wall of the fort is at present four feet.. The articles picked up here from time to time and found in the process of cultivating the soil belong both to the days of the first settlement of the country and to very modern times. There are thimbles, pipes, broken dishes, parts of pistols and rifles, pieces of silver coin, probably used as gun sights, a Chinese coin, a toy pistol, articles of Indian origin, old bullet molds, etc. The remains of an old forge were uncovered here a few years ago.”

Remember, this was before metal detectors were invented, so the old French fort is a virtual gold mine for the lucky treasure hunter who takes the trouble to relocate the site.

The first settlement established in Arkansas Territory was Davidsonville, near present-day Pocahontas, Arkansas. In 1805, John Davidson fled from New Orleans, where he had killed a man who had murdered his father. Davidson built a trading post which quickly became an important stop in river traffic. He also opened a jewelry store which became popular with Indians in the area.

Wealthy Spanish families from New Madrid moved to Davidsonville after the disastrous New Madrid earthquake. They are believed to have hidden caches of gold after they moved.

A city map of Davidsonville showed it wasn’t such a small town after all. The town covered fifty acres, with a school, church, four dry goods stores, drug store, hardware store, harness shop, blacksmith shop, barber shop, Davidson’s jewelry store, and two saloons. Then, suddenly in 1828, the town came to a sudden end. It vanished in one week.

The story is that a riverboat from New Orleans discharged passengers who carried yellow fever. The disease swept the town. Residents fled. Farmers burned the entire town to rid it of the ill vapor. Blackened timbers and bricks are commonly found today.

Three rivers, the Spring, Black, and Eleven Point, come together where old Davidsonville stood, a perfect set-up for frequent flooding. Those who returned after the epidemic decided to build elsewhere. There is no record of any of the Spanish gold, or any of Davidson’s jewelry being found.

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This location of an Indian cache of gold coins has the ring of truth to it, because Stand Watie, the only Indian to my knowledge to become a general in the Confederate Army, said that several groups of renegade Indians, over which he had no control, did rob and pillage during the Civil War all over Arkansas, the Oklahoma Territory, and parts of Missouri. In a number of instances these renegade guerrillas were caught and either shot or hanged by members of the Union or Confederate armies.

The following incident occurred in 1863. Five Indians, believed to be guerrillas, were traveling from Western Missouri to the Indian Territory in what is now Oklahoma. They were in three wagons with contraband supplies and a large amount of gold and silver coins they had taken in isolated raids. When they reached Bee Creek in northern Boone County, they learned what white men were following them.

Realizing that it didn’t matter which army caught them, they were as good as dead, the Indians buried two metal containers, filled with the coins, near the road that skirted Bee Creek. After burning their wagons over the site, the Indians slipped away, planning to return for the coins when it was safe.

All of the Indians were killed during the Civil War except one. This man returned to where he thought he and his companions had buried the coins and burned their wagons years before. He returned several times but was never able to locate the exact spot. Finally, realizing that the area had changed and that he could never find the cache, the Indian told a man named Matthew Booth, who lived on Bee Creek, about the buried coins. This was in 1900.

The Indian then left and never returned. No record of Booth’s either having found the coins, or even searching for them, can be found. So somewhere along the old road that used to go up to Bee Creek, there may be a cache of coins well worth searching for.

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While it seems unlikely, and several mineralogists have stated, that Arkansas is not geologically suited to hold deposits of gold, there is definite proof that different Indian tribes obtained enough raw ore to fashion ornaments which they wore and used in trade. The secret of these gold deposits was lost when the Indians were driven into reservations further west. But gold has been found by white men. This story tells of a few who found and mined the mineral in what is now the state of Arkansas.

One of the first trappers to reach Arkansas in the early 1800s, was a man named John Trammel. He trapped in the mountains and always traveled down the Arkansas River to its mouth, where a trading post had been established. Trammel was not an experienced prospector, although it was his habit to gather ore samples while trapping, and then have them assayed in the hope of finding something valuable.

On one of his trips, Trammel was camped about ten miles northwest of present-day Little Rock, where he picked up a quartz crystal heavily laced with gold. Selling the sample to the clerk at the trading post, Trammel was amazed to learn later that the ore sample was worth over $100. When word leaked out about this find, a company was formed in New Orleans to seek gold along the Arkansas River at a place later called Crystal Hill.

The company found deposits of gold about four miles above Little Rock, but not in paying quantities. Trammel led the group on to Crystal Hill where shafts were sunk, a smelter built and gold found that was worthwhile. Unfortunately, the shafts flooded and had to be abandoned.

Thoroughly discouraged, the prospectors decided to return to New Orleans. They moved upstream in an effort to trade with Indians for much needed supplies. Upon reaching the area of the present-day site of Dardanelle, they met a band of Caddo Indians. Noticing that the Caddoes wore gold ornaments, the white men inquired as to the location of the gold. The Indians told them of a place four days’ travel to the southeast where plenty of the yellow iron could be found. This is believed to have been in present Montgomery County, close to the Caddo River.

The party of white men decided to prospect to the southeast and after several days, using Indian guides, gold was found in rich deposits. Setting up a camp and with what few tools they had left, the prospectors began to work the new area. After several weeks in which the ore proved to be extremely profitable, the miners had accumulated quite a store of gold. Just when it seemed their troubles were over, the party was attacked by hostile Indians.

During the fight several of the prospectors were killed. The survivors were forced to retreat to the Arkansas River, leaving their mined gold behind. Heading downstream, a few of the miners managed to make it to New Orleans, vowing they would return, but there is no record that any of them did.

For interested persons, there are almost certainly deposits of gold in the vicinity of Norman, Caddo Gap, and Black Springs, Arkansas, near the Caddo River, waiting for a lucky prospector.

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In 1852, a prosperous Mississippi cotton planter named John Boggs decided that slave labor was immoral. He sold his holdings and moved to the Ozark Mountains, settling on a tract of land about ten miles north of Searcy, Arkansas. Being an industrious farmer, Boggs soon increased his fortune to $40,000. He always refused to sell any farm produce unless he was paid in gold, and it was this obsession that also caused him to keep all of his money on the farm.

In 1862, when the Civil War caused bands of straggling soldiers, of both armies, to run over and pillage his farm, Boggs decided to bury his money. According to his family, Boggs put his savings into fruit jars. One he filled with silver, and one he filled with gold coins. He decided to bury these in a freshly-plowed garden. Due to his fear of the soldiers and guerrillas, and its being after dark when he buried his coins, Boggs could never locate the money after the War.

For several years the old man could be seen digging where the garden had been and in surrounding areas, but so far as his neighbors ever knew, he never found any of the coins. The jars probably sank deeper than Boggs had anticipated. This would be a good spot, with permission, to use a deep-seeking metal detector.

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In the late 1800s, the little Arkansas community of St. Joe held hopes of turning into one of the most prosperous towns in the South. The cause of this hoped-for wealth was a silver mine bearing ore so rich that its owner said there was enough to shoe every Arkansas mule with pure silver shoes.

Residents in and around St. Joe had for a long time known of the mine. An Indian named Woodward had for a number of years worked it, but steadfastly refused to give any indication as to its location.

Some had tried to follow the Indian to the mine, but he always lost them a few miles out of town. In town, he was close-mouthed whenever the mine came up in conversation.

Then one day without warning the Indian let it be known that the mine was up for sale. A group of men got together and pooled their resources. They then approached the Indian and said they’d fork over the several thousand dollars he asked, but with one provision. First, they were to be taken to the mine and permitted to inspect it, to be certain it was indeed rich.

The Indian agreed. But, he said, the prospective owners were to be blindfolded during the trip to the mine. And it was to be made at night, just in case some of them slipped off their blindfolds for a peek at landmarks.

The terms were agreed upon.

At the mine, blindfolds were removed. The buyers inspected the mine, hardly able to believe their eyes when they knocked off chunks of ore and found it rich in silver. Without doubt, the mine was worth many times what the Indian asked for it.

Back in St. Joe, the men raised the money and turned it over to the Indian, who promptly lit out for Oklahoma Territory.

Misfortune befell the new owners. Loaded down with equipment, they set out for the mine. They couldn’t find it. They hunted it for weeks, to no avail. For years, generations of treasure hunters have searched for the mine around St. Joe, but no traces of it have turned up.

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Almost any stagecoach stations, throughout the West, have their stories of robberies, hangings, gun fights, and buried money in one form or another. Arkansas is no different than other states in this respect.

In the days of stagecoach travel, a station stood about two miles up Eanes Road off U. S. Highway 70. The land has changed hands several times over the years. In 1934, it was owned by a man named Barker. One day while clearing his garden of rocks, Barker picked up what he thought was a rock. To his amazement, it was a bar of almost pure gold. Taking his find to a bank in Little Rock, Barker sold it for an undisclosed amount.

No one ever knew how the gold bar came to be where it was, and subsequent searching failed to turn up any more bars. Since this was over twenty years before metal detectors were used, the chances of finding more gold bars or other valuables in the area are good.

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A much safer quest for a buried treasure trove can be yours in Crawford County, Arkansas. It concerns George Washington Sims, who arrived there after service in the War of 1812 to establish a homestead near the town of Shepherd Springs. You will not find this old settlement on any modern map, it just dried up and blew away years ago.

Folks tell how Sims joined the mad gold rush to California in 1849. Also, he was one of the more fortunate prospectors, striking it rich and later returning to Crawford County a wealthy man. In later years, the old prospector earned a reputation as a confirmed miser, who mistrusted banks. As a result, Sims buried his fortune on his property, perhaps in more than one location. At any rate, he was spry enough to guard his fortune until 1890, when he died at the age of 112. His corpse had hardly turned cold when grave-robbers snatched his body from its last resting place, probably imagining Sims’ shroud had pockets for carrying gold. It is presumed that the old prospector’s fortune has never been recovered from his farm.

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There is a story that John Murrell, the outlaw known as “The Man in the Bolivar Coat,” buried wealth near his home in Denmark, Tennessee. But more frequently, Murrell’s treasure is associated with the site of his stronghold on Stewart’s Island, in the upper end of Lake Chicot, Chicot County. No trace of the site remains, but it is possible that some of the older residents of nearby Lake Village remember it.

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This is a real authenticated treasure. The only question is, has it all been found or not? Old Jim Hawkins was a powerful and enterprising pioneer. He had a mill and a still about three miles east of Huntsville in Madison County. The place is still known to this day as the Hawkins Place.

Hawkins prospered, and he was very frugal. Everyone was certain that he buried his wealth. When old Jim died, neighbors began cleaning the place up for his heir, young Clyde Hawkins. In the hearth, they found an iron box containing $11,000 in gold eagles, double eagles, greenbacks, and jewelry. Another $8000 was found buried in three separate places in the yard. Around the old mill was found $7000 in Confederate money. Just before Aunt Ann Hawkins died in 1925, she is reported to have said that there was a lot of money hidden on the place that would never be found. Although there are several members of the Hawkins family in the Huntsville area, they no longer own the old Hawkins Place. But searches are still made for more treasure.

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Along Brushy Creek near Pension Mountain in Carroll County, they tell a story of a fabulous treasure cave. In the 1850s, a country doctor was making his lonely rounds through the rugged, sparsely populated hills when he was accosted by a band of renegade Indians who had been raiding the area. He was blindfolded and taken to a cave where he was told to set the broken leg of a young Indian boy.

To the doctor’s astonishment, all around him in the cave were huge piles of treasure. Chests of Spanish coins, bars of gold and silver, suits of ancient armor and weapons filled not one, but several, rooms of the cave.

Though badly broken and infected, the boy’s leg was set and treated. The Indians gave the doctor a handful of gold coins and returned him, blindfolded, to where they had stopped him. They vanished into the forest and did not raid any more in the area of Brushy Creek.

The doctor kept the gold coins for many years and searched for the cave without success until he died, always believing it lay somewhere within a half-mile of the Brushy Creek school house.

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The old William Strong tavern site is located exactly three miles north of the little village of New Castle, in St. Francis County. Strong operated a ferry on the St. Francis River, along with his tavern, inn, and general store. He was a kindly old man and minded his own business.

Just up the St. Francis River about one-fourth mile is Crowley’s Ridge. In the summer of 1885, a gang of outlaws moved into a cave at Crowley’s Ridge. The cave is a large one with several rooms. The gang was small and didn’t extend their operations much over 100 miles. They often visited Strong’s tavern, hanging about and drinking while they planned their next robbery.

Early one morning, William Strong was near the outlaw cave, hunting fresh deer meat. He saw the outlaws from a distance, digging a hole in the woods back from the cave about two hundred feet. Squatting down so he wouldn’t be seen, he saw them pouring coins from a sack into a box. Strong slipped away, continued to mind his own business, and told no one what he had seen.

At last, luck ran out for the gang one day in Memphis, Tennessee. Attempting a bank robbery on May 1, 1886, all of the gang members were killed. When news of this reached William Strong, his first thought was to try to locate their buried loot. But he was getting old, and felt that he had all he needed in life and so he rejected the notion.

A few years later, he told the story of the outlaw loot to a nephew just before he died. The nephew tried to locate the cache of buried coins, but there were not any metal detectors in those days. It was hit or miss, so he found nothing.

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With six-guns blazing, a band of daring robbers shot their way out of the First National Bank in Harrison, Arkansas, in the spring of 1880, and they escaped with an estimated $5000 in large canvas bags.

The four outlaws raced west along the old stagecoach road, which wound its way past the tiny settlement of Cappa, over Gaither Mountain, and on through the town of Batavia. With a sheriff’s posse in hot pursuit, the gang continued west toward the relay station called Midway House, approximately halfway between the present towns of Alpena and Green Forest.

As the posse began to close the distance between them, the gang halted about half a mile east of Midway House. There they are believed to have buried the loot somewhere near a clay bank on the south side of the road.

Shortly afterward, the posse overtook them. In the ensuing gun battle, all four of the outlaws were killed. One lived just long enough to indicate where the loot was buried, but, while a search was made, it was never found.

Today, the ruins of Midway House are still standing, and the old wagon road is still dimly evident a few yards to the south. A bank of clay does exist between a quarter of a mile and a half-mile to the east of the ruins, on the south side of the old road. The site is in Boone County, about a mile south of Highway 65.

Montgomery County is located about 30 miles west of Hot Springs. In the southwestern corner of the county flows the Little Missouri River, and somewhere near Missouri Falls there is buried a wash-pot which is believed to contain $60,000 in gold, at yesteryear’s prices. It was originally one of two wash-pots that were buried containing gold, it is stated. The other wash-pot held $100,000 in gold and was buried in a different spot.

Along about 1900, a man named Arthur C. White came to Montgomery County with a waybill to the treasure. This was the first time residents were aware of its existence. White said there were two caches and gave the above value for each. He did not say how they had come to be buried there.

Following directions given on his waybill, White succeeded in recovering the wash-pot that held $100,000 in gold, but he was unable to unearth the remaining pot and left without it. He never came back. The chances are that it is still there, awaiting some lucky finder.

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At a point about 20 miles below Memphis, Tennessee, 4000 muskets destined for the State Militia of Arkansas lie buried in the muddy waters of the Mississippi River. The year was 1868, and Arkansas was in the Reconstruction Period. Crimes of all kinds were rampant, civil disorder prevailed, and a general unrest among the people led Governor Clayton to declare martial law. He divided the state into military districts and instructed the militia to enforce the proclamation with whatever means were necessary.

James Hodges was appointed as agent to go north and purchase arms for the militia. A short time later the cargo of muskets arrived in Memphis, where it was to be shipped by boat on the final leg of the journey. The steamboat Hesper, under the command of Captain Sam Houston, was chartered by the governor and sent to Memphis on October 12. After the Hesper had loaded the cargo or arms, she left Memphis on October 15 for the return trip. About 20 miles downriver, the Hesper was overtaken by the steam tug Nettie Jones. Masked men boarded her, held the crew at gunpoint, and threw the arms over the side. Returning to the Nettie Jones, they steamed away. Captain Houston continued on to Little Rock with the bad news. A few months later, the captain and the crew of the Nettie Jones were captured at Devall’s Bluff. No attempt was made to recover the lost cargo, and it still waits for some lucky treasure hunter.

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Juan Terron was a foot soldier with De Soto’s ill-fated expedition up the Mississippi River and into Arkansas. Spanish records indicate that De Soto’s men found 35-weight of pearls, plus figures of babies and birds made from iridescent shells in Georgia in 1539. The treasure was divided among the men, and Juan received six pounds of the pearls.

As the expedition moved north and west, the going got rougher. Indian attacks, lack of food, and fatigue caused the six pounds of pearls to feel much heavier, and the young foot soldier offered half his share to a cavalryman if he would carry the load on his horse. When the horse-soldier refused the offer, Juan Terron opened and slung the bag of pearls in a circle over his head until it was empty.

The six pounds of pearls were valued at $12,000 in Spain at that time and would be worth much more today. Tradition says that the pearls were discarded quite near Caddo Gap in present-day Montgomery County, west and a little south of Hot Springs and Lake Ouachita.

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The casino at Spring Lake, near Hot Springs, had enjoyed a busy night. Quiet now prevailed as the boss was counting the take, and the employees were cleaning up for the next day’s group of hopefuls. The quietness of the work routine was suddenly shattered as the club owner bolted out of the counting room with the money box in hand and fled down the hall toward the parking lot. Banging his way through the exit, he sprinted to his car and raced off into the night. In less than 10 minutes, he was back.

As he opened the car door, he was greeted with a hail of bullets and slumped over the wheel motionless. Several employees sprang to his aid, but he was beyond mortal help. Amidst the excitement and bewilderment, the employees had just begun to wonder what brought this chaotic scene when the sky suddenly lit up in a bright glow. The casino was on fire! Was the murderer also an arsonist?

After dealing with the fire, the employees discovered that the money box, reputed to contain some $50,000 in cash and a lot of expensive jewels, was not in the car, and it has never been found. Attesting to this is the fact that there has never been any evidence of the fencing of the jewelry, not even by gossip.

The facts stand out to suggest that the owner was aware of a threat of robbery. First, he was moving the money at night. Second, he was doing it by himself. Ordinarily, when transferring money, the owner would handcuff the money box to another man and then drive him to the bank during daylight hours to make the deposit.

The owner’s family searched diligently for the treasure box, as did scores of others, but nothing was turned up. It would seem apparent that the box was cached near the casino, as the owner was gone for fewer than 10 minutes, but the steep ravines, gullies, and small canyons have proved to be a safe depository for the cache since 1923.

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For more than a century, men have searched for a fabulous silver deposit along the rock ledges overlooking Ten Mile Creek, some 16 miles north of Judsonia. Highway 157 crosses this creek one mile south of the community of Steprock, where many have spent the greater part of their lives in a fruitless search for this lost loot.

It is known that the Osage Indians worked with silver in this area. Where did the silver come from? Is there a deposit nearby? These questions are being answered, but slowly. The consensus of opinion s that large quantities of silver will one day be found along the bluffs that border Ten Mile Creek. The prospect is drawing out-of-state interest, hastening the day of discovery. Perhaps you will be the lucky treasure hunter who finds the source of the Osage silver.

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On October 17, 1899, a northbound train was traveling along what is now known as the Rock Island Railroad just east of Forest City, in St. Francis County. In the train’s strongbox was a little over $12,000 in gold, which was being transported from West Helena to Jonesboro, Arkansas.

It became evident that news of the gold shipment had leaked out, for as the train approached the bridge over Crow Creek near Forest City, the span was suddenly blown apart by a blast of dynamite, and the train came to a halt. As the train stood motionless, an awaiting masked man jumped into the engine cab, and held the crew at gunpoint while two more masked men threw dynamite under the car carrying the gold shipment, and then fled to cover. It was obvious that they knew what they were doing.

The blast blew the treasure car apart and killed the two guards. The outlaws broke open the strongbox and transferred the gold to their saddlebags. They then fled to the woods.

A posse from Forest City and West Helena was soon in hot pursuit. After three days of flight, just out of range of the posse, the bandits found themselves at the forks of the White River and Cypress Bayou in Prairie County. It was here that they decided on a new strategy. They would each take a handful of gold coins for spending money and bury the rest. They planned to meet back at this point on Christmas Day to divide the remaining loot. Their next move was to split in different directions, and this they did.

Information gained later provides us with the names and the fates of the outlaws. They were Max Perry, Roy Hutton, and Walter Drake. Perry had ridden north, and five days after the holdout he was shot by a farmer while trying to steal a horse. Hutton had headed south and was killed by an alert deputy sheriff, in the town of Clarendon, Arkansas. Drake had fled to the west and was captured by the sheriff of White County at Search, Arkansas. The chase had ended, and two of the outlaws were dead within six days following the robbery. But the story continues, with Drake’s being returned to Forest City for trial.

Drake was questioned many times during his incarceration by both law officials and railroad detectives as to the whereabouts of the loot, but he remained silent on the subject. While in prison, Drake contracted some unknown disease and died after serving seven years and two months of his 20-year prison sentence.

This treasure story might have ended with Drake’s death, but for Drake’s young cellmate, Billy Joe Gordon. Gordon, serving a murder sentence, had been cooped up with Drake for nearly five years. They had become good friends, and when Drake knew he was dying, he told Gordon the story of the buried gold.

At the forks of the White River and Cypress Bayou, where they had split up, they had stepped off exactly 45 paces due south from an old oak tree located about 400 feet from the forks, also due south. Here they took a short-handled shovel and dug a hole about four feet deep and buried the gold coins.

Gordon, when he was released, tried to find the treasure but was unable to do so, as the passage of time had caused the landmarks to change.

So, a few hundred feet south of the confluence of White River and Cypress Bayou, about four feet deep, is a pile of gold coins worth a small fortune.

http://gwiz.co/treasures/arkansas.php

Categories: Lost Treasure | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

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