Posts Tagged With: benefit

Benefit raffle for Chicago’s Ron’s Niece…..


My 6 year old niece Jolie was diagnosed with stage 3 cancer last month. She spent 2 weeks in the hospital starting her first round of chemo. She is now home and is coping surprisingly well. This will be a long battle and to support My family I will be doing a fund raiser. I will post more info next week. A chance for people to win some great prizes and help my sister Brandy Kneip and her family to focus on Jolie instead of bills.For every $20 increment of donation you will receive 1 entry for the drawing
(i.e. $100 = 5 entries), I will be including some finds from England and the Dig Wars show.

jolie

Jolie’s Fund raiser page is ready, Please check out the Caring Bridge site for Jolie’s story and updates. Lots of great donated items that will be given away and listed on the Donation page. Any questions contact me at rpg61@msn.com
Thanks you for the donations and prayers.

http://chicagoron.com/propagandapage/Jolie%20fund%20raiser%20page.htm#

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Kens Cancer Benefit…Sponsored by The Detecting Lifestyle Radio Show


https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kens-Cancer-Benefit/491700550916369
How to make a donation and get tickets for the Benefit Drawing:
Prizes keep getting added!!
To Purchase Tickets for the Ken MacIntyre Benefit Fund Raiser:
Each $5 donation gets you a ticket
You can snail mail a check or money order made out to Lisa MacIntyre to:
Greybird
P O Box 126
Acworth, GA 30101
**Please send a self-addressed stamped envelope to receive your stubs via return mail**
You can Paypal your donation:
Log into your Paypal account and pay to LisaMac59@yahoo.com
Please include name, address, phone and email.
Everyone is very excited about the EIGHT (8) detectors that will be given away in the Benefit Drawing Oct 21st. But there are also many other great prizes. For example:

$250 Gift Card from Detectors.com (Detectors Electronics)
2 Treasure Wise Carry bags (Outdoor Outfitters)

Dick Stout’s books:
Where to Find Treasure
In Search of Treasure
The New Metal Detecting: The Hobby
Coin Hunting….in depth!

Over $200 in books from K.B. Slocum:
~Galleon Alley, The 1773 Spanish Treasure Fleet. By Weller paperback $19.98
~I Rode with Stonewall, by Douglas….hardback $52.95
~Shipwrecks & Treasures by Cahill….paperback $8.95
~Treasure on the Chesapeake Bay by Tevillian and Carter….paperback $9.95
~Santa Fe, the Autobiography of a Southwestern Town, by LaFarge..pabk $37.00
~The Buried Treasures of Maine, by Stevens….paperback $10.00
~The Outer Banks of North Carolina, by Stick….paperback $14.95
~Civil War on the Western Border, by Monaghan….paperback $10.95
~ Sherman’s March Through the Carolina’s, by Barrett hdback $30.00
~Shallow Water Treasure Hunting, by Granville…..paperback $9.95

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Gettysburg offers lessons on battlefield medicine…..


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As gunshots ravaged the bodies of tens of thousands of soldiers at the Battle of Gettysburg, military doctors responded with a method of treatment that is still the foundation of combat medicine today.
Union Army Maj. Dr. Jonathan Letterman is remembered as the father of battlefield medicine for his Civil War innovations. He realized that organizing the medical corps was a key for any battle.
“For military medicine, in particular, the lessons that Letterman gave us are as true today as they were then,” said retired Lt. Gen. Ronald Ray Blanck, the former surgeon general for the U.S. Army.
Before the war, medical supplies were handled by regular quartermaster wagons, Blanck said, meaning they had to compete with “beans and bullets.”
The situation was so bad that, in some early Civil War battles, the wounded were left on the field for days, subject to the mercy of untrained troops and civilians.
In 1862, Letterman began to create an ambulance corps and three tiers of field hospitals: at the battlefield for simple wound dressing, nearby for emergency surgery and behind the battle lines for long-term care and recovery.
Dale Smith, a professor of military history at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, Md., said Letterman’s innovations were so successful that Prussian and English observers wrote home to praise the system.
“There’s never been any question that he changed military medicine internationally,” Smith said.
But the Battle of Gettysburg was 150 years ago, and some have wondered how that could possibly be relevant for doctors in Iraq and Afghanistan, said George Wunderlich, director of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick, Md.
Wunderlich recalled that about 10 years ago, a military member remarked that it was a shame the Civil War “has nothing to do with what we do today” with battlefield medicine.
But after Wunderlich told him how Civil War doctors resolved problems with transportation, training and even corruption, the man asked Wunderlich if those topics could be turned into a one-day course.
Another man who complained that the Civil War training sessions were “unrealistic” called Wunderlich later after responding to Hurricane Katrina, where moving supplies was slow and difficult and even some cell towers were down.
“He says, ‘I’m so sorry. I’m in 1862 down here and now I get it,'” Wunderlich recalled.
Now, more than 5,500 military members and emergency responders have attended history courses run by the Museum of Civil War Medicine. The classes are designed to get people to think about how decisions get made in combat or crisis, and some are taught on battlefields at Gettysburg and Antietam. The courses include topics such as courage and innovation; artillery and its effects; evacuation; and stress and fatigue.
“Our job is to use history to save the lives of people” today, Wunderlich said.
Some of the lessons are subtle. For example, instead of just inspecting hospitals and his staff, Letterman sat beside Union General George McClellan during pre-battle meetings to better predict where to station ambulances and doctors.
“These are the kinds of things that come out from thinking about history,” Blanck said. “The battles are won or lost on the creativity of the medical officer and the support of the commander.”
Wunderlich said the museum also works to dispel many myths about Civil War medicine. The battles and wounds were certainly horrible, but anesthesia using chloroform or ether was involved in more than 95 percent of all major operations, he said.
And while doctors didn’t yet understand exactly what germs were, they had noticed that patients did better when certain folklore was practiced. So while military camps were known for being filthy, hospitals followed strict rules for washing bed sheets and letting in plenty of fresh air and sunlight.
“They didn’t know why, but they knew it worked and they put it to use,” Wunderlich said.
But the biggest benefits of Civil War medicine may have come in the decades after the war, Wunderlich said. The young doctors and medics who had witnessed so much horror and saved so many lives went on to become leaders in many communities, pushing for public health reforms in major cities.
“Those people never stopped practicing medicine,” Wunderlich said. “The benefit to the public was immediate.”

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