Posts Tagged With: battle

This Week in the Civil War……


This Week in The Civil War, for week of Sunday, March 30: Forrest’s Confederate raiders occupy Paducah, Ky.

Forces of legendary Confederate cavalry leader Nathan Bedford Forrest swept into Paducah, Ky., on March 25, 1864, and briefly occupied the city — forcing a Union garrison of hundreds of troops to relocate defensively to a fort there. The Union garrison, backed by two gunboats on the nearby Ohio River, refused surrender and shelling of the Confederates by the gunboats ensued. Forrest’s raiders destroyed supplies and rounded up horses, sowing panic among retreating civilians. The Associated Press reported on the raid in a dispatch dated March 26, 1864. AP said an estimated force of 5,000 Confederates captured Paducah at 2 p.m. a day earlier, sacking the place and firing weapons. AP reported that a Union officer in charge of the garrison continued to occupy the fort below the city with about 800 men. “The rebels made four assaults on the fort, and were repulsed each time. Three of our gunboats opened on the city during its occupation by the enemy, much of which was burned,” The AP reported. Some 3,000 civilians had fled the Confederate advance, AP noted, adding that they returned home to find considerable damage once the raiders pulled out. AP added “Twenty-five houses around the fort were destroyed … as they were used by the rebel sharpshooters as a screen” during the incursion.

paducah19lg

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LIBERALS’ WORST NIGHTMARE ABOUT TO COME TRUE…General’s plan would unite tea parties with 1 common voice…


MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. – Retired Maj. Gen. Paul E. Vallely, chairman of Stand Up America, has just unveiled the liberals’ worst nightmare, a plan to unite the tea party into a vast army to turn America back to its constitutional roots.

“We’re in a battle for America. We must save America and today we’re going to do it,” Vallely said. “America is at a crossroads, and it’s up to us to take the right road and get this country back again. We’ve got to do it. We’ve got to stand up.”

Vallely has been at the forefront of calls to return America to her constitutional roots by removing “usurpers” from office. Among those is a call for a House-led parliamentary style vote of “no confidence” in the Obama administration.

While such a vote would send a message that Congress believes he has violated his oath of office, it would not be legally binding.

Vallely has said the American people are frustrated now because of the lack of leadership seen by those who claim to adhere to the Constitution and conservative values.

“The tea-party people are looking for leadership,” he said. “The next level is where do we go with the tea party?”

In an attempt to provide that leadership, Vallely said he sought feedback from various tea-party groups around the nation and is wanting to integrate them into a coordinated plan of attack to take back the country from the left-wing ideology spearheaded by President Obama.

Maj. Gen. Paul E. Vallely (ret.)

Among the other plans Vallely has advocated is taking control of the language that is often used to tar conservatives and Republicans. One approach is to have candidates run as an American first.

“We want candidates to run as an American first before being a Republican American or a Democrat,” he explained. “We know that in the end they’re going to have to get on either the Republican or Democrat tickets, but we want to ask each candidate to run as an American before they run as a Republican, Democrat or independent. And then say as an American this is what I stand for.

“There is an appeal if I tell you that I’m running as an American before anything else and I stand for the Constitution, that I have values, I have traditions, I have faith, I love all of those things and that’s what I’m going to run on,” Vallely explained. “This whole concept of running against an American and not even mention Democratic Party/Republican Party is very powerful.”

He also called for getting away from hyphenated labels that tend to divide us: “We’ve got to change the dialogue. So anytime someone tries to identify you as a white, black, or Hispanic or brown set him straight. I am interfacing and working with you as an individual.”

Vallely’s thoughts on hyphenated labels echo that of another great American, John Wayne. In his album, “America: Why I Love Her,” the Duke has a track called “The Hyphen.”

In it he says, “When a man calls himself an Afro-American, a Mexican-American, Italian-American, an Irish-American, Jewish-American, what he is saying is I’m a divided American.”

While the actions proposed by Vallely are certainly formidable, they pale in comparison to his most ambitious proposal yet, to unite the tea party under a common leadership.

Despite the “party” in its name, the tea party is not a nationally organized group like the major political parties.  Consequently, the tea party does not have the political clout it could have if it were a more unified force.

To strike this balance Vallely announced his plan to create an organization that will consist of a leadership council that will help the organizations speak as one voice while still maintaining their separate identities.

“What we are recommending is after receiving a lot of feedback and talking to people is forming the American Provisional Leadership Council,” Vallely said. “It will work with all the tea parties to be a voice in Washington, D.C., to direct the government on what they need to do. So we have a common voice.”

Vallely explained that he is not attempting to force the various tea-party groups to submit to the leadership council, but he is creating it to provide a tool to go on the offensive in 2014.

He said his goal is to have at least eight people on the council who come from all walks of life and possess what he calls “common-sense wisdom.” Those he is looking for could be seniors, three- or four-star generals, enlisted service members or even corporate executives.

“They will work in unison with all the tea parties, and we will be a voice to be reckoned with,” Vallely said.

 

 

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Sarah Rosetta Wakeman…Secret Female Union Soldier of the Civil War….



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Sarah Rosetta Wakeman, most often referred to as Rosetta, was born on January 16, 1843, in Afton, New York, to Harvey Anable and Emily Wakeman, the first of nine children in the family. She worked hard on her father’s dairy farm to help support her family, and later worked as a domestic. Her father was deeply in debt, and he also served as town constable.
At the age of 19, Rosetta left home and traveled to the nearest large city, Binghamton, New York, looking for work, but soon realized that she could make more money by disguising herself as a man. She was hired as a boatman on a coal barge, and sent a large portion of her earnings back to her family.

On her first trip up the river, Rosetta met several soldiers from the 153rd New York Regiment of Volunteers, who told her they had received a $152 signing bonus and were earning $13 a month in pay. Army recruiters assumed she was a male and asked her to join.

She used the name Lyons Wakeman, and claimed to be 21 years old. She was accepted into the regiment on August 30, 1862. The description on her enlistment papers said that she was five feet tall, fair-skinned, with blue eyes. The regiment was sent to Washington DC, in October 1862, where they remained for nine months, defending the nation’s capital against rebel advances. Rosetta wrote home saying, “I can drill as good as any man in my regiment.”

Wakeman’s first letter home was sent on November 24, 1862. In the letter, she explained what she did after she left home, and how she ended up as part of the Union Army. She began sending money home, and attempted to mend any broken fences with her comment: “I want to drop all old affray and I want you to do the same and when I come home we will be good friends as ever.” Interestingly enough, she signed her early letters with her birth name, making no attempt to hide her identity in case her letters were intercepted.

In her letters, Rosetta expressed her strong religious faith, the pride she felt at being a good soldier, and her strong desire to be financially independent, a dream that was shared by many nineteenth-century women. She was outspoken, independent, and hoped to buy a farm of her own after the war.

In February 1864, her unit was sent to Louisiana to take part in General Nathaniel Banks’ Red River Campaign. Rosetta experienced battle up close for the first time in April 1864.
By April 1864, Major General Nathaniel Banks’ Red River Campaign had advanced about 150 miles up Red River. Major General Richard Taylor (son of President Zachary Taylor), commander of the Confederate forces in the area, decided that it was time to try and stem this Union drive. On April 8, Taylor fought to a victory at the Battle of Mansfield or Sabine Crossroads.

Battle of Pleasant Hill
The bulk of the Federal army came back together at Pleasant Hill. Banks then decided to withdraw to Grand Ecore, while leaving a strong rearguard at Pleasant Hill. This force probably numbered around 11,000 men. To oppose it, Taylor now had close to 13,000 men, having been reinforced by two divisions late on April 8.

Early on April 9, 1864, Taylor’s forces marched toward Pleasant Hill in the hopes of finishing the destruction of Banks’ army. Taylor felt that the Yankees would be timid after Mansfield and that an audacious, well-coordinated attack would be successful. The Confederates closed up, and rested for a few hours.

At 5:00 pm, Taylor launched a vigorous attack, which met with some initial success. He planned to send a force to assail the Union front while he rolled up the left flank and moved his cavalry around the right flank to cut off the escape route.

The attack on the Union left flank, under the command of Brigadier General Thomas Churchill, succeeded in sending those enemy troops fleeing for safety. Churchill ordered his men ahead, intending to attack the Union center from the rear. Union troops, however, discerned the danger and hit Churchill’s right flank, forcing a retreat. By the end of the day, only one Confederate division remained intact.
Of the deceased soldiers Rosetta wrote, “sometimes in heaps and in rows… with distorted features, among mangled and dead horses, trampled in mud, and thrown in all conceivable sorts of places. You can distinctly hear, over the whole field, the hum and hissing of decomposition.”

Pleasant Hill was the last major battle of the Louisiana phase of the Red River Campaign. Although Banks won, he retreated toward Grand Ecore, wishing to get his army out of west Louisiana before any greater calamity occurred.
Rosetta wrote her last letter home on April 14, 1864, five days after the battle:
Our army made an advance up the river to Pleasant Hill about 40 miles. There we had a fight. The first day of the fight our army got whip[ped] and we had to retreat back about ten miles. The next day the fight was renewed and the firing took place about eight o’clock in the morning. There was a heavy Cannonading all day and a Sharp firing of infantry. I was not in the first day’s fight, but the next day I had to face the enemy bullets with my regiment. I was under fire about four hours and laid on the field of battle all night. There was three wounded in my Co. and one killed.

I feel thankful to God that he spared my life, and I pray to him that he will lead me safe through the field of battle and that I may return safe home.
Near the end of the Red River Campaign, drinking water became scarce, and Rosetta and her fellow soldiers drank from streams that were poisoned by the rotting flesh of dead animals. The connection between contamination and infection wasn’t understood at that time. The Union soldiers were stricken by chronic diarrhea, and died by the thousands.
Rosetta fell sick and was admitted to the regimental hospital at Alexandria, Louisiana, on May 3, 1864. When her condition worsened, she was transferred again to a Federal hospital in New Orleans on May 22. The trip south was fraught with problems. By the time she reached her destination, she was in the acute phase of dysentery. Her illness persisted, slowly draining the life from her.

Sarah Rosetta Wakemen died on June 19, 1864. If the nurses or doctors there discovered her true gender, they didn’t report it. She was buried as a soldier at the Chalmette National Cemetery in New Orleans. Her headstone reads, “Pvt. Lyons Wakeman.”

Many years later, Rosetta’s letters were discovered by a relative in the attic of the farmhouse where Rosetta grew up, in upstate New York. They were published in 1994 by editor Lauren Cook Burgess as An Uncommon Soldier: The Civil War Letters of Sarah Rosetta Wakeman, alias Pvt. Lyons Wakeman, 153rd Regiment, New York State Volunteers, 1862-1864. It wasn’t until then that the military discovered she was a woman.

In 1994, on the 130th anniversary of Rosetta Wakeman’s death, historians and Civil War buffs gathered for a reception in her honor followed by a visit to her grave at Chalmette National Cemetery, where she is buried in Section 52, Grave No. 4066.

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UPDATE!!…..Battle-Bruised Skeleton May Be King Richard III



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A human skeleton with a cleaved skull discovered beneath a parking lot in England may belong to King Richard III, researchers announced today (Sept. 12), though they have a long way to go in analyzing the bones to determine the identity.

The researchers note they are not saying they have found King Richard III’s remains, but that they are moving into the next phase of their search, from the field to the laboratory.

“[W]e are clearly very excited, but the University now must subject the findings to rigorous analysis. DNA analysis will take up to 12 weeks,” Richard Taylor, the director of corporate affairs at the University of Leicester, told reporters this morning, as recorded in a tweet.

The remains were hidden within the choir of a medieval church known as Greyfriars, where the English monarch was thought to be buried. Though the location of this church had been lost, historical records suggested Richard III was buried there upon his death in battle in 1485.

Two skeletons were discovered: a female skeleton that was broken apart at the joints was discovered in what is believed to be the Presbytery of the lost Church; the other skeleton, which appears to be an adult male, was found in the church choir and shows signs of trauma to the skull and back before death, which would be consistent with a battle injury, the researchers said. [See images of the Richard III discoveries]

“A bladed implement appears to have cleaved part of the rear of the skull,” according to a University of Leicester statement.

In addition, a barbed metal arrowhead was lodged between the vertebrae of the male skeleton’s upper back, Taylor said, adding that the spinal abnormalities suggest the individual had severe scoliosis, though was not a hunchback, as he was portrayed by Shakespeare in the play of the king’s name.

Even so, the scoliosis seen in the skeleton would’ve made the man’s right shoulder appear visibly higher than the left one. “This is consistent with contemporary accounts of Richard’s appearance,” according to the university statement.

University of Leicester archaeologists began excavating the parking lot of the Leicester City Council building on Aug. 25, in search of the church and the king’s remains. Since then, they have turned up the Franciscan friary, a 17th-century garden thought to hold a memorial to the king and various other artifacts.

On Aug. 31, the dig team applied to the Ministry of Justice for permission to begin exhuming the two skeletons, a process that began on Sept. 4.

“We are hopeful that we will recover DNA from the skeleton,” University of Leicester geneticist Turi King said at the briefing, as recorded in a tweet by the university.

The king’s tales

King Richard III ruled for England two years, from 1483 to 1485, before dying in the Battle of Bosworth Field, part of the War of the Roses, an English civil war between the House of Lancaster and the House of York.

A century later, William Shakespeare penned “Richard III,” a play about the tragic king — the last English king to die in battle.

The king seemed to have his own following. “Richard III is a charismatic figure who attracts tremendous interest, partly because he has been so much maligned in past centuries, and partly because he occupies a pivotal place in English history,” Philippa Langley, a representative of the Richard III society, said in a statement.

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