Posts Tagged With: arrowheads

Some GHOST TOWNS OF ILLINOIS


 

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JO DAVIESS COUNTY

1…Council Hill…near the State line on railroad, 7 miles Northeast of Galena
2…Scales Mound…near State line on railroad, 13 miles West of Warren
3…Law…near State line on railroad, 10 miles West of Warren
4…Apple River…on the State line and railroad, 5 miles West of Warren
5…Winston…on railroad, 5 miles East Southeast of Galena
6…Schapville…4 1/2 miles Northwest of Woodbine
7…Blanding…on railroad and Mississippi River, 5 miles West Northwest of Hanover.
8…Old Hanover…in the far Southwest corner ofthe county on railroad and Mississippi River, 4 1/2 miles South Southwest of present Hanover.
9…Derinda Center…5 miles Southeast of Elizabeth
10…Pleasant Valley…on the South County line and the Plum River, 5 miles South Southwest of Willow.
STEVENSON COUNTY

1…Afolkey…4 miles Northwest of Dakota
2…Damascus…4 miles West of Cedarville
3…Winneshiek…5 miles Northeast of Freeport
4…Dunbar…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles South of Freeport
5…Stevens…2 miles North of German Valley
WINNEBAGO COUNTY
1…Letham Park…on the railroad, 5 miles South of Rockton
2…Genet..on the railroad, 3 miles West of Loves Park
3…Alworth…on the railroad, 5 miles East of Seward
4…Elida…on the South County line, 4 miles South of Winnebago
BOONE COUNTY
1…Amesville…near Garden Paririe…old stage coach stop on the Old Galena/Chicago Road.
MC HENRY COUNTY
1…Lawrence…on the railroad, 3 miles Northwest of Harvard
2…Armsby…on the railroad and State line, 3 miles West of Richmond
3…Sonon Mills…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles Southeast of Richmond
4…Johnburg…2 1/2 miles Northeast of McHenry
5…Terra Cotta…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles South of McHenry
6…North Crystal lake…on the railroad, 2 miles Northeast of Crystal Lake
7…Coral…2 miles Southeast of Marengo
8…Coyne…on the railroad and South county line, 1 1/2 miles West of Huntley.
LAKE COUNTY
1…Hickory…3 miles West of Rosecrans
2…Gilmer…on the railroad, 4 miles Southwest of Mundelein
CARROLL COUNTY
1…Marcus…on the railroad by North County line, 6 miles Northwest of Savanna.
2…Barth…on the North County line, 8 miles North Northwest of Mt. Carroll
3…Palsgrove…on the North County line, 6 miles North of Mt. Carroll
4…Keltner…on the North County line, 7 1/2 miles Northwest of Lanark
5…Hickory Grove…on the railroad, 5 miles East of Savanna
6…Timbuctoo…on the railroad, 5 miles South Southeast of Savanna
7…Big Cut…on the railroad, 3 1/2 miles Southwest of Mt. Carroll
8…Ashdale…on the railroad, 3 miles West of Lanark
9…Nursery…5 miles East of Lanark

Categories: artifacts, Ghost Towns, Haunting, hidden, Metal Detecting, silver, silver coins, treasure, Treasure Hunting, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

NORTH EAST TEXAS, TREASURE LEGENDS AND GHOST TOWNS


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NORTH EAST TEXAS, TREASURE LEGENDS AND GHOST TOWNS

WISE COUNTY
GHOST TOWNS
1. Ball Knob, 4 miles Northeast of Alvord, on the gravel road off the old Alvord Highway.
2. Pella, on the North county line, 10 miles Southwest of Forestburg.
3. Audubon, 5 miles East of Alford near Bethel Church
4. Greenwood, 6 miles Northwest of Sidell
5. Brumlow, 4 miles Southwest of Greenwood
6. Crafton, on the West county line, 8 miles West Northwest of Chico
7. Babb, 2 1/2 miles East of Chico
8. Flat Rock, 7.2 miles Northwest of Decatur on the old Alvord Hwy. Note: Cemetary marks the location
9. Cowen, on the railroad, 7 miles Northwest of Decatur
10. Gourley, a few miles East of Decatur, just south of Hwy 24
11. Berkshire, on railroad, 6 miles West Southwest of Bridgeport
12. Balsora, 5 miles North Northeast of Boonsville
13. Galvin, on railroad, 5 miles West Northwest of Boyd
14. Anneville, 7 miles South of Decatur off Hwy 730. Note: School house marks location.
15. Draco, 8 miles Southwest of Paradise
16. Cottondale, 8 miles South of Paradise.

Treasure Legends..Wise County

1. A fortune in gold was buried by Dutch furniture and wagon maker somewhere near the old wagon factory at Bridgeport.
2. A large shipment of gold was stolen from a stagecoach and buried North of the spring at the first stage stop out of Bridgeport.
3. A cache of $200,000 in gold coins was buried in the area of Devil’s Den during a battle with hostile Indians which is near Bridgeport
4. H. C Ruth buried several bags of gold coins in 1871 on his ranch, between two trees on the banks of a creek. He was killed by an outlaw while going into town, the cache has never been recovered.
5. The Shannon Ranch near Paradise was used as a hideout by gangsters in the 1930’s, it is believed stolen loot is hidden on the property.
6. Sam Bass, outlaw and bandit is said to have buried some of his loot along Wise Creek in Wise County
7. Sam Bass was in a gun fight with lawmen at Salt Creek near Cottondale and buried some of his loot there. It has yet to be recovered.

PARKER COUNTY

GHOST TOWNS
1. Advance, 3 miles South of Poolville
2. Reno, 3 miles North Northwest of Azle
3. Veal’s Station, 9 miles North of Weatherford on Hwy 51, then 1 mile off the road to the site.
4. Rock Creek, on the railroad and West County line, 4 miles East of Mineral Wells.
5. Millsap, on the railroad, 13 miles West Southwest of Weatherford
6. Lambert, on the railroad, 9 miles West Southwest of Weatherford
7. Earls, on the railroad, 5 miles East of Weatherford
8. Anneta, on the railroad, 3 1/2 miles West of Aledo
9. Brock, 10 miles South Southwest of Weatherford
10. Buckner, on South County line, 15 miles South Southwest of Weatherford

TREASURE LEGENDS..PARKER COUNTY
1. Mexican outlaws robbed the early settlers in the Weatherford area in the 1840’s. Towns folk revolted and chased and killed most of the gang but the leader buried a large cache of gold coins and other loot in the area of Weatherford near the old outskirts of town.
2. In 1930 an old CCC camp was located outside of Weatherford near the old Curtis Diggings.

TREASURE LEGENDS AND GHOST TOWNS…TARRANT COUNTY
GHOST TOWNS
1. Wayside, 15 miles North Northwest of Fort Worth on Hwy 1220. Note: School house marks the spot
2. Avondale, on the railroad and tri-county line 7 miles West of Haslet
3. Bransford, on the railroad, 5 miles Southwest of Grapevine
4. Smithfield, on the railroad, 10 miles Southwest of Grapevine
5. Plover, on the railroad, extreme Southwest corner of the county, 7 miles Southwest of Benbrook
6. Kennedale, on the railroad, 5 miles NW of Mansfield.

TREASURE LEGENDS…TARRANT COUNTY
1. William Riddle, a wealthy farmer reportedly buried $100,000 somewhere on his ranch which was near Fort Worth.

Categories: Ancient Treasure, Texas, Treasure Legends | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Louisiana Treasure….Ghost Towns and Legends. Franklin, Madison and Richland Parishes…


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Franklin Parish…Louisiana
Ghost Towns.
1. Durham, North County Line, 10 miles due North of Crowville
2. Warsay, on the Bayou Macon, 5 miles NorthEast of Crowville
3. Cordill, 6 miles NorthEast of Chase
4. Como, 5 miles NorthEast of Gilbert
5. Liddieville, 7 miles West of Winnsboro by West County Line
6. Mason, 5 miles West of Fort Neccessity by West County Line
7. Hollygrove, 2 miles West of Peck
Treasure legend.
1. A man named Evans buried his life savings around the 1900’s in 2 half gallon fruit jars. It was all in $10 and $20 gold pieces. The location is somewhere on his farm, 3 miles East of Baskin.

MADISON PARISH…Louisiana
Ghost Towns
1. Reynolds, on railroad spur and North County line, 2 miles Southwest of Sondheimer.
2. Katz, on railroad spur, 4 miles Southwest of Sondheimer
3. Omega, on the Mississippi River, 6 miles North Northeast of Tallulah
4. Mulikens Bend, on the Mississippi River, 2 miles South Southeast of Omega.
5. Tendal, on railroad, 2 1/2 miles East of Waverly
6. Quebec, on railroad, 5 miles East of Waverly, old steamboat landing on the Tensas River
7. Lake One, on railroad, 7 miles East of Waverly
8. Richmond, 2 1/2 miles South of Tallulah on the junction of Brushy and Round Away Bayous. Was a prosperous trading center, burned down twice, accidently in 1859 and by Federal Troops in 1863. Only foundations remain.
9. Barnes, on railroad, 5 miles East Southeast of Tallulah
10. Thomastown, on railroad, 8 miles East Southeast of Tallulah
11. Duckport, on the Mississippi River, 2 1/2 miles North of Mound
12. Ashwood, on bank of Lake Palmyra, old river landing.
13. Old Delta, located several miles East of present day Delta, town was move when the river changed course in 1876, the old townsite later became a haven for bootleggers and robbers.
14. Coleman, 3 1/2 miles Southwest of Mound
15. Alligator Bayou, on railroad, 3 1/2 miles North Northwest of Afton
16. Quimby, on railroad and South County line, 2 miles West Southwest of Afton.
17. Trinidad, 5 miles East Northeast of Afton
18. King, on the South County line, 5 miles due East of Afton
19. Griffin, on the Mississippi River, 13 miles due East of Afton.
Treasure Legends
1. Legend puts an early 1800’s outlaw and robber in the area of the Mason Hills for hidden loot. It is a stretch of Highlands across the Mississippi River from Vicksburg, Mississippi.
2. Indian Gold and treasure was supposed to have been found by Sieur de La Salle in 1682 at the great Indian town of Taensas. The town was located somewhere below Grand Gulf and Vicksburg on the West bank of he Mississippi River.

RICHLAND PARISH…Louisiana

GHOST TOWNS
1. Tonesburg, on railroad, 3 1/2 miles North of Rayville
2. Dunn, on railroad, 3 1/2 miles West of Delhi
3. Lucknow, 5 miles South of Start
4. Burke, on railroad, 4 miles North of Archibald
5. Buckner, 4 miles West of Alto
6. Charlieville, 5 miles Southwest of Alto
7. Boughton, 8 miles South of Alto
TREASURE LEGENDS
1. The mouth of the Bayou Amulet was a trading rendezvous location. Artifacts should be found at this location.
2. A man named Bullen lived West of Delhi on Eudora Road during the Civil War, later named McLaurin farm, fearing the Federal Troops he took his life savings in gold coins and dropped them into a well. He died a few days later and the gold has yet to be recovered.
3. A famous local outlaw named Samuel Mason buried his loot and treasure near Delhi, but non has been recovered yet.
4. Frank and Jesse James had a hideout near Delhi, on the outskirts of town. Locals believe they may have buried treasure in the area. (Note: they would have left KGC symbols to help in relocating any treasure buried)

Categories: Ghost Towns, Louisiana, Treasure Legends | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

California Lost Treasure……Jack Stewart’s Lost Lode


The 1870’s were “silver years” in the mining history of the American West. After the fabulous Comstock silver strike in western Nevada, silver replaced gold in the hearts of the miners and prospectors of the West. 1873 was a big year at the Comstock mines as massive new silver lodes were discovered in the lower workings. These fabulous silver discoveries sent out a ripple of excitement to all parts of the West as prospectors poured over the mountains in search of the white metal. Soon after the Comstock windfall, prospectors discovered incredibly rich silver deposits in the Panamint Range of eastern California. Some of the Panamint ore assayed out at $3000 worth of silver per ton of ore!

Silver was king in Colorado during the 1870’s. It was during those years that the so-called “carbonate craze” swept the state. Prospectors scouted the mountains in search of silver-bearing ore bodies emplaced in carbonate rocks such as limestone. Prospectors looked for limestones that were closely associated with igneous rocks. And they found them! It turned out that Colorado was particularly well-endowed with silver deposits. In 1878, one of the greatest silver camps of all was born with the discovery of a 10-foot thick, tabular bed of silver-bearing lead carbonate. Leadville instantly leaped to prominence. In the San Juan Mountains of southern Colorado, a similar ore body near Rico was worked during the 1870’s.

The white metal was also king in Arizona during the 1870’s. The great silver district of the Trigo Mountains got its start with the discovery of the rich Black Rock and Pacific lodes in 1877.

Then, around the turn of the century, gold again replaced silver in importance as numerous rich strikes were made all over the West. 1891 was the year of the great Cripple Creek gold rush. Situated at an elevation of 10,000 feet, the gold-choked throat of the buried “Cripple Creek volcano” has produced over $430 million in gold! Cripple Creek was the last of Colorado’s great gold camps. In 1895, the fabulous lode deposits of Randsburg were discovered in the Mohave Desert of southern California. The Randsburg mines produced nearly a million ounces of gold during their lifetime. Southern California was the scene of another rich

gold strike during the 1890’s. The discovery took place in the Panamint Mountains, about 7 miles south of the abandoned silver camp of Panamint City. The mining camp that sprang up along the western flank of the Panamints was named after the famous Australian gold camp known as Ballarat.

In 1897, it was Alaska’s turn. The great Alaskan gold rush took prospectors to the Klondike and then to Nome the following year. The great placer deposits of Alaska have produced over 20 million ounces of gold to date. In the early 1900’s, the focus shifted back to the American Southwest. In 1902, the fabulous ore bodies at Goldfield, Nevada were discovered. The mines at Goldfield eventually produced over 4 million ounces of the yellow metal. The Goldfield strike sent a pulse of excitement throughout the desert Southwest. Prospectors combed the wilderness, looking for gold and silver ores similar to those at Tonopah and Goldfield. In 1904, the famous Death Valley prospector “Shorty” Harris discovered the rich Bullfrog lode, near the Nevada/California border. Two years later, prospectors returned to the Panamints and located the gold deposits at Skidoo. The Panamints had a way of luring back prospectors again and again. It had happened back in 1873, and then in the 1890’s, and then again in 1906.

One of the many prospectors drawn to the Panamint Range during the 1890’s was a veteran of the Death Valley country named Jack Stewart. In 1897, Stewart found himself on the Death Valley side of the Panamints, not far from Stovepipe Wells. During a rare Death Valley downpour, Stewart was forced to take cover along the northeastern flank of the range. In one of the many small canyons that cut the range, Stewart discovered a freshly-exposed deposit of gold-bearing quartz float! He gathered up some samples, waited out the storm, and continued on his way to Stovepipe Wells. Eventually, Stewart returned to the Panamints to search for the source of the rich float. But the landscape had somehow changed! Perhaps another storm had altered the canyon floor, but in any case, Stewart was unable to locate the deposit. He never did.

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Stunning Photos Show Caves Where Ancient People Lived For Centuries Before Suddenly Vanishing


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These stunning pictures show the caves where the ancient Anasazi people lived in America thousands of years ago.

Amateur photographer Wayne Pinkston snapped the astonishing images around the south-west of the U.S.

The pre-Columbian Anasazi civilisation lived in the alcoves because they could be easily defended.

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But they suddenly abandoned their homes around 1300AD, and never came back.

Virginia-based Mr Pinkston said it was “enthralling” and “very primal” to “look out and see the same thing they did so long ago.”

“Being in these ruins at night is fascinating. To see the starlit sky, and be surrounded by ancient habitations where people once thrived is magical,” he wrote on his Flickr account.

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“It’s like going back in time. The alcoves just glow with the light. You can imagine the glow of fires illuminating the ceiling and walls centuries ago,” he added.

The people lived in the area from around 200AD until 1300AD, when the disappeared.

Some researchers speculate that they migrated elsewhere, with others thinking they left because of drought.

(Pictures courtesy of Caters News Agency)

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Mexican site yields new details of sacrifice of Spaniards..cooked and eaten….


MEXICO CITY (AP) — It was one of the worst defeats in one of history’s most dramatic conquests: Only a year after Hernan Cortes landed in Mexico, hundreds of people in a Spanish-led convey were captured, sacrificed and apparently eaten.

Excavations at a site just east of Mexico City are yielding dramatic new details about that moment when two cultures clashed — and the native defenders, at least temporarily, were in control.

Faced with strange invaders accompanied by unknown animals, the inhabitants of an Aztec-allied town reacted with apparent amazement when they captured the convoy of about 15 Spaniards, 45 foot soldiers who included Cubans of African and Indian descent, women and 350 Indian allies of the Spaniards, including Mayas and other groups.

Artifacts found at the Zultepec-Tecoaque ruin site, show the inhabitants carved clay figurines of the unfamiliar races with their strange features, or forced the captives to carve them. They then symbolically decapitated the figurines.

“We have figurines of blacks, of Europeans, that were then intentionally decapitated,” said Enrique Martinez, the government archaeologist leading this year’s round of excavations at the site, where explorations began in the 1990s.

Later, those in the convoy were apparently sacrificed and eaten by the townsfolk known as Texcocanos or Acolhuas .

The convoy was comprised of people sent from Cuba in a second expedition a year after Cortes’ initial landing in 1519 and they were heading to the Aztec capital with supplies and the conquerors’ possessions. The ethnicity and gender of those in the convoy were determined from their skull features.

Some place the number of people in the group as high as 550. Cortes had been forced to leave the convoy on its own while trying to rescue his troops from an uprising in what is now Mexico City.

Members of the captured convoy were held prisoner in door-less cells, where they were fed over six months. Little by little, the town sacrificed, and apparently ate, the horses, men and women.

“The aim of the sacrifices … was to ask the gods for protection from the strange interlopers,” the National Institute of Anthropology and History said in a statement.

But pigs brought by the Spaniards for food were apparently viewed with such suspicion that they were killed whole and left uneaten. “The pigs were sacrificed and hidden in a well, but there is no evidence that they were cooked,” Martinez said.

In contrast, the skeletons of the captured Europeans were torn apart and bore cut marks indicating the meat was removed from the bones.

Some of the first European women to set foot in Mexico weren’t treated chivalrously. Along with the men, they were apparently kept in the walled-in spaces for months, with food tossed in, perhaps through small windows. A find last week indicates one woman was sacrificed in the town plaza, dismembered, and then had the skull of a 1-year-old child, who apparently was sacrificed as well, placed in her pelvis, for reasons that were probably symbolic and remain unclear.

While Spaniards later wrote accounts of the massacre that occurred in 1520, a dark year for the conquistadors, archaeologists are finding things they didn’t mention.

“The interesting part is that the historical sources (mainly Spanish chroniclers) didn’t mention the presence of women in the convoy, and here we have a large presence of women” among remains excavated so far, Martinez said.

Fifty women and about 10 children are estimated to have been in the convoy, and all were killed.

The Spaniards’ goods were, on the whole, treated indifferently. A prized and elaborate majolica plate from Europe was tossed into the wells as were the Spaniards’ jewelry and their spurs and stirrups, which were of no use to the Indians. A horse’s rib bone, however, was prized and carved into a musical instrument.

“This seems to be even more spectacular information about an important event of the Conquest … about which we have very little historical documentation,” wrote University of Florida archaeologist Susan Gillespie, who was not involved in the project. “It does add new dimensions to the acts of resistance of the indigenous people. There is the wrong-headed notion that many of them simply capitulated to the more superior European forces. But it is the victors who write the histories of war.”

The bloodiness of the brief chapter of dominance by the indigenous group is sealed in the second name of the Zultepec ruin site, Tecoaque, which means “the place where they ate them” in Nahuatl, the Aztec language.

When Cortes’ soldiers returned to the town, they found that townspeople had strung the severed heads of captured Spaniards on a wooden “skull rack” next to those of their horses, leading some to think the Indians believed that horse and rider were one beast.

When Cortes learned what happened to his followers, he dispatched a punitive expedition of troops to destroy the town, setting into motion a chain of events that actually helped preserve it.

The inhabitants tried to hide all remains of the Spaniards by tossing them in shallow wells and abandoned the town.

“They heard that he (Cortes) was coming for them, and what they did was hide everything. If they hadn’t done that, we wouldn’t have found these things,” Martinez said.

Cortes went on to conquer the Aztec capital in 1521

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Italy’s bloody secret…..


They were always portrayed as victims of fascism, but Mussolini’s soldiers committed atrocities which for 60 years have gone unpunished. Now the conspiracy of silence is at last starting to unravel.

The footnotes of Italian history record Giovanni Ravalli waging war on criminals. He was a police prefect who kept the streets safe and pursued gangs such as the one which stole Caravaggio’s The Nativity from a Palermo church in 1969. An adviser to the prime minister, a man of the establishment, he retired on a generous pension to his home at 179 Via Cristoforo Colombo, south Rome, to tend his plants and admire the view. He died on April 30 1998, aged 89.

The footnotes do not record a Greek policeman called Isaac Sinanoglu who was tortured to death over several days in 1941. His teeth were extracted with pliers and he was dragged by the tail of a galloping horse. Nor do they mention the rapes, or the order to pour boiling oil over 70 prisoners.

After the war Ravalli, a lieutenant in the Italian army’s Pinerolo division, was caught by the Greeks and sentenced to death for these crimes. The Italian government saved him by threatening to withhold reparations unless he was released. Ravalli returned home to a meteoric career that was questioned only once: in 1992 an American historian, Michael Palumbo, exposed his atrocities in a book but Ravalli, backed by powerful friends, threatened to sue and it was never published.

His secrets remained safe, just as Italy’s secrets remained safe. An audacious deception has allowed the country to evade blame for massive atrocities committed before and during the second world war and to protect the individuals responsible, some almost certainly still alive. Of more than 1,200 Italians sought for war crimes in Africa and the Balkans, not one has faced justice. Webs of denial spun by the state, academe and the media have re-invented Italy as a victim, gulling the rest of the world into acclaiming the Good Italian long before Captain Corelli strummed a mandolin.

In reality Benito Mussolini’s invading soldiers murdered many thousands of civilians, bombed the Red Cross, dropped poison gas, starved infants in concentration camps and tried to annihilate cultures deemed inferior. “There has been little or no coming to terms with fascist crimes comparable to the French concern with Vichy or even the Japanese recognition of its wartime and prewar responsibilities,” says James Walston, a historian at the American University of Rome.

The cover-up lasts to this day but its genesis is now unravelling. Filippo Focardi, a historian at Rome’s German Historical Institute, has found foreign ministry documents and diplomatic cables showing how the lie was constructed. In 1946 the new republic, legitimised by anti-fascists who had fought with the allies against Mussolini, pledged to extradite suspected war criminals: there was a commission of inquiry, denunciations, lists of names, arrest warrants. It was a charade. Extraditions would anger voters who still revered the military and erode efforts to portray Italy as a victim of fascism. Focardi’s research shows that civil servants were told in blunt language to fake the quest for justice. A typical instruction from the prime minister, Alcide De Gasperi, on January 19 1948 reads: “Try to gain time, avoid answering requests.”

Yugoslavia, Greece, Albania, Ethiopia and Libya protested to no avail. “It was an elaborate going through the motions. They had no intention of handing over anybody,” says Focardi. Germans suspected of murdering Italians – including those on Cephalonia, Corelli’s island – were not pursued lest a “boomerang effect” threaten Italians wanted abroad: their files turned up decades later in a justice ministry cupboard in Rome.

Britain and the US, fearful of bolstering communists in Italy and Yugoslavia, collaborated in the deception. “Justice requires the handing over of these people but expediency, I fear, militates against it,” wrote a Foreign Office mandarin. The conspiracy succeeded in frustrating the United Nations war crimes investigation. There was no Nuremberg for Italian criminals.

Given the evidence against them, it must rank as one of the great escapes. General Pietro Badoglio’s planes dropped 280kg bombs of mustard gas over Ethiopian villages and strafed Red Cross camps. He died of old age in his bed, was buried with full military honours and had his home town named after him. General Rudolfo Graziani, aka the butcher of Libya, massacred entire communities; his crimes included an infamous assault on the sick and elderly of Addis Ababa. His men posed for photographs holding severed heads. General Mario Roatta, known to his men as the black beast, killed tens of thousands of Yugoslav civilians in reprisals and herded thousands more to their deaths in concentration camps lacking water, food and medicine. One of his soldiers wrote home on July 1 1942: “We have destroyed everything from top to bottom without sparing the innocent. We kill entire families every night, beating them to death or shooting them.”

Italy’s atrocities did not match Germany’s or Japan’s in scale and savagery, and it is no myth that Italian soldiers saved Jews and occasionally fraternised with civilians. Glows of humanity amid the darkness; yet over time they have suffused the historic memory with blinding light.

The distortion can partly be blamed on British prejudices about Italian soldiers being soft and essentially harmless, says Nic Fields, a military historian at the University of Edinburgh: “Many British historians liked to focus on the luxury items found in Italian barracks. It reinforced the image of opera buffoons. Your average Tommy tended to caricature the Italians as poor sods caught up in the war.”

The crimes have been chronicled in specialist journals but never became part of general knowledge. Ask an Italian about his country’s role in the war and he will talk about partisans fighting the Ger mans or helping Jews. Ask about atrocities and he will talk about Tito’s troops hurling Italians into ravines. Unlike France, which has deconstructed resistance mythology to explore Vichy, Italy’s awareness has evolved little since two film-makers were jailed in the 1950s for straying off-message in depicting the occupation of Greece.

When Japanese or Austrians try to gloss over their shame there is an outcry, but the Italians get away with it. The 1991 film Mediterraneo, about occupiers playing football, sipping ouzo and flirting with the locals on a Greek island, was critically acclaimed. Captain Corelli’s sanctification of Italian martyrdom was not challenged. Ken Kirby’s 1989 BBC Timewatch documentary, Fascist Legacy, detailing Italian crimes in Africa and the Balkans and the allies’ involvement in the cover-up, provoked furious complaints from Italy’s ambassador in London. The Italian state broadcaster, Rai, agreed to buy the two one-hour programmes, but executives got cold feet and for 11 years it has sat in a vault in Rome, too controversial to broadcast. “It’s the only time I can remember a client shelving a programme after buying it,” says a BBC executive.

Kirby did manage to show it at a film festival in Florence. The reaction was toxic. “They put security on me. After the first reel the audience turned around and looked at me, thinking ‘what a bastard’.”

A brief storm of publicity engulfed Michael Palumbo, the documentary’s historical consultant. “I was practically assaulted by several Italian journalists. There was a sackful of death threats, some from former soldiers.”

The documentary gave a voice to Italian historians such as Giorgio Rochat, who have provoked disapproval from colleagues by attacking the myth. “There remains in Italian culture and public opinion the idea that basically we were colonialists with a human face.”

Another historian, Angelo Del Boca, says those guilty of genocide were honoured. “A process of rehabilitation is being organised for some of them by sympathetic or supportive biographers.” He says that for decades his research was obstructed – an accusation echoed by Focardi. Vital documents are “mislaid” or perpetually out on loan. Just one example: 11 years ago a German researcher found documents and photographs of Italian atrocities in Yugoslavia in the central state archive, a fascist-built marble hulk south of Rome. No one has been able to gain access to them since.

Such scholars are few, but thanks to their work a tentative reappraisal may be under way. While paying homage last march to the Italian troops massacred by Germans on Cephalonia, President Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, noting that Italy invaded Greece, asked forgiveness. Newspapers such as La Stampa and Manifesto have reported new research, and a weekly magazine, Panorama, confronted Ravalli before he died. But Italy remains entranced by its victimhood. Television commentary for a military parade in Rome earlier this month hummed the glory and sacrifice of the armed forces. Newspapers splashed on the possibility that a 92-year-old former Nazi SS officer living in Hamburg, Friedrich Engel, may be prosecuted for crimes in Genoa. Other former Nazis accused of murdering Italians are being pursued now that the fear of a “boomerang” effect against Italian criminals has evaporated.

Last month workers digging in northern Ethiopia stumbled on yet another Italian arms depot suspected of containing mustard gas. Addis Ababa asked Rome to respect an international weapons treaty by revealing the location of stockpiles and helping to clear them. Like all other requests over past decades, it was rebuffed. “All efforts on Ethiopia’s side to convince Italy to live up to its responsibilities have failed,” lamented the government.

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Parrot laughs like a super villain…


Categories: 2nd Amendment, adult radio | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Common Treasure Hunters Disease Identified!….


Treasure Hunting can become an addiction.  Just like being addicted to alcohol, sex or drugs; Treasure Hunting can itself become ones drug of choice.  People have been known to forgo family and finances to pursue fantastic fortunes and more times than not, those fortunes are VAPOR!  It is the pursuit of this vapor that is the real Treasure Hunters Disease!

Find Your Fortune

Being a public figure and accessible through Social Media (just search your favorite Social Media outlet for “TreasureForce” and you will find us) one gets exposed to many different types of treasure hunters and the experience runs the gamut.    Here are some of the different Treasure Hunting Types and ALL of these types can suffer from the particular Treasure Hunters Disease this article will be talking about.  They are (in no particular order of importance):

1.  The Recreationist:  This is the hobby hunter that pursues the sport mainly for the adventure and being outside.  As much enjoyment can come from the find as the actual hunt and being in the great outdoors.

2.  The Intelligentsia: These are the treasure hunters (intentionally not capitalized here) that do their work only behind the computer or in online groups.  Offer readily their opinions, but do not actually practice in the field (this meaning – literally in-the-field as in “outdoors”).

3.   The Loreist:  These treasure hunters engage mainly for the history and lore and can be the most passionate and are totally fine if they never make a recovery, they just love the pursuit.

4.  The Artifact Recovery Agents: These are the practicing treasure hunters, locally focused on recoveries and engage for recoveries. Not as a business, but as a hobby or for supplemental income.  They are about recovery and recovery is the payoff.

5.  The Side-Line Coach:  The are the treasure hunters who have engaged in the hunt, in the field, at some time in their career, but may not have an opportunity to continue hunts (usually due to their geographical locations) but have a passion for the hobby and love to share their ideas and techniques with others.

6.  Professional Cacheologists:  Simply out, the Treasure Hunter that makes their living pursing the sport and making recoveries.  Hunting treasure pays the bills and is their career.

No, before I jump off into the common Treasure Hunters disease all of the above can suffer from, let me share some impressive treasure symbol finds.  These symbols and markers were found in areas with KNOWN Lost Treasures and these image are very compelling.

Indian_Face_Colorado This fantastic marker is in Colorado.  Millions of dollars of lost treasure exist within the eye gaze path of the eyes of this ancient Warrior.  Very impressive indeed! 

Map after map and legend after legend speak of this fantastic carved Warrior and many have speculated as to what the eyes actually line up with in the distant horizon.

Even the native peoples from the area speak of the nature and wisdom of this stone face and how it may reveal vast secrets and others know it leads to mass riches of gold and possible ancient Aztec Artifacts known to of been brought to America.

Look at the amazing symmetry and details in this stone carving.  They are impressive.

If you haven never been exposed to this known rock structure and if the story above was all the information you had on this structure, then you would be amazed and impressed.  Rightly so!  But you would be wrong.  Dead wrong and suffering from a condition known as:

Pareidolia

No one is immune.  All of the six different groups of Treasure Hunters – at one time or another – suffer from Martian_face_viking_croppedPareidolia.  What is Pareidolia?

Pareidolia (/pærɨˈdliə/ parr-i-DOH-lee-ə) is a psychological phenomenon involving a vague and random stimulus (often an image or sound) being perceived as significant, a form of apophenia. Common examples include seeing images of animals or faces in clouds, the man in the moon or the Moon rabbit, and hearing hidden messages on records when played in reverse.

The word comes from the Greek words para (παρά, “beside, alongside, instead”) in this context meaning something faulty, wrong, instead of; and the noun eidōlon (εἴδωλον “image, form, shape”) the diminutive of eidos. Pareidolia is a type of apophenia, seeing patterns in random data.  To the right is the most well know photo of Pareidolia.  The Mars viking Image know around the world.

So why am I laying all this out?  No one is immune to mistaking an image, symbol or rock on the ground is REAL-AUTHENTIC and a TREASURE SYMBOL.  In fact, some of us become so enamored with these images that we SWEAR and WILL BET OUR LIFE SAVINGS these are man made carved and excavated symbols, locations or images that we will spend our families life savings in pursuit of the treasure that this symbol PROVES is there.  But there in lay the catch – this is not a symbol and never was a symbol and it is being read as a symbol without any research or conclusive proof of a real treasure.

This Pareidolia occurs when people want to SHORT CUT the investigation and decide to leap ahead and forgo the real forensic work, and investigation and documentation and science work, and just ANNOUNCE “I have made a discovery!”  Point is, just because it looks like a sign does NOT make it a sign.  For example:

What is the difference between a symbol and a treasure symbol?

A symbol can be carved into stone, wood, landscape or put on paper and is the actual act of mans hand.

A Treasure Symbol, is the EXACT SAME AS ABOVE, but one real difference IT LED TO AN ACTUAL RECOVERY OF TREASURE OF SOME KIND!

Do you get the subtle, but very real difference?  The Treasure Symbol LED TO A RECOVERY!

Almost every week people post photos of “KGC-Spanish Valuts” and how they have found one.  But when asked, what they are really saying in actual words is “I found a mix of vague symbols and I think they are KGC and thus I have chosen to conclude there is a KGC Vault nearby in relation to this symbol”.  Know that is some what harsh, but I have a good friend that constantly tells me of his KGC Vault Discoveries and I always ask him the same question:  “Was that a tumbler locked vault or a magnetic combination vault?”  and – you guessed it, he cannot answer since he is really expressing “I think a vault is near”.

So, here is the painful truth.  Just because you announce it as a Treasure Symbol, Man Made Structure or Location of Treasure, it does not make it such until YOU ACTUALLY MAKE A FIND AND RECOVERY!  It is that simple.

Why is this distinction important?  We can all get wrapped up in the wording and forget that what we engage in called Treasure Hunting (no matter the level you participate at) there is science and rules involved.  And ALL signs and symbols to be real have to have a find or recovery attached to them.

Now I do want to point out two well known instances where “calling BS” can have consequences:

1.  The ‘finder” calling the find real and then when debunked they (the finder) calls out the debunk-er with “You are only trying to suppress the truth”.  Then there is the other side of the coin:

2.  The “debunk-er” who has no vested interest in the find or has never been to the find automatically calling “Fraud, Fake or Other”.

None of the two above are really right.  The only one really correct is the individual who puts the time, money and expertise into investigating, documenting, forensic analyzing and researching of the symbol or unique location.  Then and only then can the truth be obtained and then and only then can there be a real educated decision made.

You see, those who call Pareidolia related findings real and are not willing to out in the time and research necessary to PROVE IT UP, hurt the industry of treasure hunters and make everyone look like quacks and flakes.  And on the other side, those who always claim “Fake, Fraud, or Bogus” on everything presented do harm as well.  How?

Those types of people are what keep people from making announcements and sharing what might of never been seen.  The truth is – everyone has to work together to make this work, be counted and come to light.  Those who find MUST go the extra mile and do real research and science (like finding supporting artifacts, or tools or even tool marks) to prove up the site, symbol or landmark.  And those who are the naysayers, need to try to assist, guide and suggest so the real truth can be brought to the forefront, because after all:

WE ARE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER!

Below are some more known Pareidolia symbols and locations:

Paréidolie_CiansBaba_YagaBucegi_Sphinx_-_Romania_-_August_2007

 

Giuseppe_Arcimboldo_-_The_Jurist_-_WGA00837Gotland_Raukar-Hoburgsgubbenbadlands-guardian-buddy

Categories: Ancient Treasure, gold, gold chains, KGC, Treasure Hunting | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Lost Treasure: Leon Trabuco’s Gold…Farmington, New Mexico


Farmington, New Mexico, 1933. In the heat of the summer, a pilot named Red Moiser landed several mysterious flights in the desert. There, he was met by a Mexican millionaire named Leon Trabuco.

It’s believed that Trabuco and four other men were quietly buying up much of Mexico’s gold reserves to resell in the United States when the price went up. Trabuco was convinced that because of the Great Depression, the United States would soon devalue the dollar, and that gold prices would skyrocket. But the chance to make huge profits carried huge risks. The gold had to be smuggled into the United States. If the men were caught, they faced long prison terms.

At a makeshift Mexican foundry, gold coins and jewelry were melted down and cast into ingots. In less than three months, the partners had collected almost 16 tons of solid gold.
Trabuco searched the US for a safe place to hide the illegal treasure. When he couldn’t find a suitable spot, he decided it would be smarter to bury the gold.

Legend has it that Trabuco chose a sparsely populated region of New Mexico, near the Ute and Navajo Indian Reservations. Red Moiser allegedly made 16 flights, carrying one ton of gold each time. Pick up trucks then transported it to a secret burial site. Trabuco never revealed the location to his co-conspirators. And he never made a map.

Records indicate that the final shipment was delivered on July 14, 1933. Six months later, the Gold Reserve Act of 1934 became law. The price of gold soared. Overnight, the men’s potential profit increased by seven million dollars.

The group decided not to sell the gold, hoping the price would go even higher. But they were not aware of an executive order related to the Gold Act. It declared that after January 1934, private ownership of gold within the US was illegal. According to treasure hunter Ed Foster, the partners had missed their chance to strike it rich:

“FDR put into effect the gold embargo that takes gold off of the market and makes it illegal, and so, consequently, these five men from Mexico City, they had 20 ton of junk. It was not worth a dime because they couldn’t sell it for anything.”

The gold seemed to bring bad luck. Within five years, three of the partners had died untimely deaths. Over the next two decades, Trabuco was unable to sell the now illegal gold. When he died, he apparently took the secret location to his grave.

For 35 years, Ed Foster searched for Trabuco’s treasure in the desert around Farmington, New Mexico. He’s convinced that he found the 1933 landing strip used by Red Moiser on a plateau called Conger Mesa:

“I believe that Conger Mesa is where the plane would adjust and come in and land. I met this Indian lady that couldn’t speak English so I got an interpreter. She said she had watched that plane land there many, many times.”

Ed interviewed another Navajo woman who was six years old in 1933. Ed said she remembered several Mexican men who lived on the Reservation:

“This would be very unusual for a Mexican to move out here. For a Spanish or a White man to move out here and live would be unheard of.”

Twenty miles west of the mesa, near an old Navajo home, stands a building unlike any other on the reservation. Ed believes it was built by men Trabuco hired to guard the gold:

“This house has windows, a front door, and a back door. And it had a veranda. To me, this house would look good in Tijuana, Mexico, but not on the Navajo reservation.”

Ed also found another intriguing clue: a date and some words etched in the face of a stone outcropping. He calls it Shrine Rock, and believes it may be the key to finding Trabuco’s treasure. It reads: “1933 sixteen ton.”

Ed is sure that the gold is buried somewhere within this triangle formed by Conger Mesa, Shrine Rock and the Mexican-style home. Ed asked renowned treasure hunter Norman Scott to make a detailed survey of the area:

Categories: Ancient Treasure, Archaeology, gold, gold chains, gold crosses, gold ingots, Legends, Lost Treasure | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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