Posts Tagged With: 007

Poison pens and lipstick guns: 8 real-life spy weapons


Park Sang-hak, an anti-Pyongyang defector now living in South Korea is near the top of North Korea’s hit list. The outspoken activist was recently the target of a would-be assassin equipped with three seemingly innocent, easy-to-conceal weapons plucked straight from a 007 script. A South Korea “investigation official,” speaking with CNN, described the weapons thus: A poison-tipped device built to look like a Parker ballpoint pen; a second pen equipped to shoot poison-filled bullets directly into the skin; and a small flashlight rigged to fire three bullets at close range. “You’d notice a gun,” said Park, “but these weapons are so innocuous [they could] easily kill someone [without warning]. I’d be dead immediately.” Park is hardly the first to be the target of top-secret spy weaponry. Here, eight other imaginative killing devices that have actually been produced:

1. Lipstick gun
Meet the “kiss of death.” This famous Cold War-era pistol may look like an ordinary lipstick, but it was designed by KGB operatives to let a Soviet femme fatale fire a single 4.5mm bullet at anyone unlucky enough to get caught in her cross-hairs.
2. Exploding rats
During World War II, Britain’s Special Operations Executive (SOE) devised a clever plan to blow up enemy boilers by hiding explosive rat carcasses in German coal piles. Supposedly, an unsuspecting enemy would simply toss the dead rat into the nearby fire to dispose of the body and… kaboom! The plan went awry when German authorities seized the first consignment of the devices — and went on to showcase them in the country’s top military academies.
3. Flamethrower glove
Patrick Priebe, a cyberpunk weapons hobbyist, designed this hand-mounted flamethrower using just four lithium ion batteries, butane, a NE555 circuit board, and a transformer to spew fire right from his palm.
4. Umbrella dart gun
Just one day before his 1978 death in London, Bulgarian dissident writer Georgi Markov felt a sharp prick in his thigh. He looked up to see a man clumsily fiddling with an umbrella before speeding off. The brolly had shot a dart loaded with a pellet of ricin, a sophisticated poison. The pellet was coated in a special wax designed to melt at body temperatures, releasing the ricin into the bloodstream. The shooter, believed to be a member of the Bulgarian secret police, was never caught.
5. Exploding chocolate
Prime Minister Winston Churchill did not like the Nazis. And the Nazis did not like Prime Minister Winston Churchill, as evidenced by a letter written by a high-ranking World War II-era British intelligence officer, referencing a bizarre Nazi assassination plot to kill the boisterous politician with explosive chocolate. “We have received information that the enemy are using pound slabs of chocolate which are made of steel with a very thin cover of chocolate,” wrote Lord Victor Rothschild of British intelligence. “Inside there is a high explosive and some form of delay mechanism.” Fortunately, British spies discovered the candy bombs, which were to be placed around the War Cabinet’s dining room, before anyone could have a taste.
6. Pistol glove
Another product of the Cold War-era KGB, this glove-cum-pistol be fired with the twitch of a finger. “It gave the wearer the ability to get within point blank range before firing a lethal shot,” says Buck Sexton at The Blaze. “Oddjob would be proud.”
7. Poisoned cigars
On August 16, 1960, a CIA official was handed a box of Fidel Castro’s favorite cigars… along with instructions to rig them with a deadly poison. The cigars were treated with a toxin called botulinum, reportedly so potent it could kill any man who attempted to light one of the cigars. Though the cigars were duly doctored, it’s unclear if they ever even made it into Castro’s vicinity.
8. CIA’s heart-attack gun
During a mid-1970s Senate testimony, it was revealed that the CIA had developed a dart gun capable of causing a heart attack. The dart — which could penetrate clothing, leave skin unmarked except for a small red bump resembling a mosquito bite, and then disintegrate — was filled with a deadly shellfish toxin. The advantage, says InfoWars, was that officials would attribute the victim’s death to natural causes in the event of an autopsy. It’s unclear if the heart attack gun was actually ever used.

Categories: Politics, Strange News, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

WWII….Noor Inayat Khan: The Indian princess who spied for Britain….



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The Princess Royal is set to unveil a sculpture of Noor Inayat Khan, dubbed the “Spy Princess” by her biographer Shrabani Basu in London’s Gordon Square Gardens.

Raised in Britain and France and a descendant of Indian royalty, bilingual Noor Inayat Khan was recruited by the elite Special Operations Executive (SOE) in 1942 to work in Paris as a radio operator.

Records from the national archives show she was the first female wireless operator sent to Nazi-occupied France during World War II.

After evading capture for three months, the spy was imprisoned, tortured and eventually shot by the German Gestapo at Dachau concentration camp in 1944.

Her final word – uttered as the German firing squad raised their weapons – was simple. “Liberté”.

Liberty was a notion the pacificist-turned-war-heroine held deeply, according to Ms Basu.

For her bravery, she was posthumously awarded the George Cross. In France she was honoured with the Croix de Guerre, and later with two memorials and an annual ceremony marking her death.
Indian royalty

Brave, glamorous and both sensitive and formidable, it is said she acted not out of a love for Britain, but out of an aversion to fascism and dictatorial rule.

Her father was a musician and Sufi teacher, and Noor Inayat Khan was raised with strong principles and believed in religious tolerance and non-violence.

Ms Basu claims she “couldn’t bear to see an occupied country”, a notion that seems to run in her family.

Noor Inayat Khan’s great-great-great-grandfather was Tipu Sultan, an 18th century Muslim ruler of Mysore. He refused to submit to British rule and was killed in battle in 1799.

Born on 1 January 1914 in Russia to an Indian father and American mother, the agent’s infancy was spent in London.

The family moved to France when she was a child and lived in Paris, where she was educated and learnt fluent French.
The national archives describe how the sensitive young woman studied both medicine and music.

In 1939 the Twenty Jataka Tales, a collection of traditional Indian children’s stories she had retold, were published in Le Figaro.

When war broke out in 1939, Noor Inayat Khan trained as a nurse with the French Red Cross.

She fled the country just before the government surrendered to Germany in November 1940, escaping by boat to England with her mother and sister.
‘Tigress’

Shortly after arriving in the UK, she joined the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF) as a wireless operator and soon caught the attention of recruiters from the SOE.

Also known at the time as Nora Baker, Khan joined the elite spy squad in 1942.

She was deployed to France a short time later despite an SOE training report describing her as “not over-burdened with brains” and “unsuited to work in her field”.

Codenamed “Madeleine”, she joined others in the resistance network Prosper, famously tasked by then Prime Minister Winston Churchill to “set Europe ablaze”.

Despite suspicions that the network had been infiltrated by a Nazi spy, Khan refused to return to Britain, risking arrest by the Gestapo.

Ms Basu – who spent eight years researching her life – told the BBC: “She was this gentle writer of children’s stories, a musician, but she was transformed. She was a tigress in the field.”
With her team gradually captured by the Gestapo, Noor Inayat Khan continued for as long as possible to send intercepted radio messages back to England.

Despite her commanders urging her to return to England, she single-handedly ran a cell of spies across Paris for three more months, frequently changing her appearance and alias.

Eventually, she was betrayed, arrested and imprisoned. She was sent to Pforzheim prison in Germany where she was kept shackled and in solitary confinement.

She refused to reveal any information, despite 10 months of repeated beatings, starvation and torture by her Nazi captors.

Her fortitude – and two escape attempts – led her captors to brand her “highly dangerous”, despite her pacifist upbringing.
‘Inner strength’

In September 1944, she and three other female SOE agents were transferred to Dachau concentration camp where on 13 September they were shot and killed.

Ms Basu has described her life as “inspirational”, and said the modern world can draw lessons from the story of Noor Inayat Khan.

She said: “For her to come into this world on the front line taking on the Gestapo, showed her inner strength and her courage, her immense courage and resilience.

“It’s very inspiring, especially given the the troubled times that we live in. It is important to remember these qualities and values.

“Two and a half million Indians volunteered for the war effort and it was the largest single volunteer army.

“I think we must not forget their contribution. Noor was part of this.”

Categories: Strange News, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

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