hidden

Arizona…Lost Shipment Of Dragoon Pistols:


59299085_1426688107474422_7914077331415629824_nIt was in 1871 that a shipment of 24 Colt Dragoon Pistols was making its way from back East to its final destination at Fort McDowell. The pistols were under military escort, consisting of eight men. A sergeant, four soldiers a Lieutenant as well as a civilian packer.

The escort left Camp Pinal (Picket Post Mountain in Superior) beginning their arduous journey to Fort McDowell. After traveling on the only real road at the time (which was a stage road) the soldiers were attacked by between 15-25 Apaches at a spot where the road narrows tightly between two hills, making an ambush a flawless success.

As the first explosion of Apache’s gun fire erupted and in less than 15 seconds the four soldiers and the civilian packer were killed in a failed attempt to return fire. The Lieutenant and Sergeant grabbed the reigns of the pack mule that was carrying the pistols and made a frantic attempt to get away from the ambush and make their way back to the garrison Camp Pinal.

They rode like hell over several ridges and down into washes while being pursued by the Apaches, but were soon cut off by more warriors riding down on them from their chosen escape route. So the Lieutenant and Sergeant cut north and either rounded a sharp bend and took shelter inside of a small cave and prepared for their defense. The first warrior to round the bend charged the cave and was shot in the face by the Lieutenant and the pursuing Apache dispersed (at least appeared to disperse).

After about three hours of waiting and not seeing any signs of movement around them from the Apache, they decided to lighten their load to make a fast get away to Fort McDowell through the Superstition Mountains. So they took off the 24 Pistols that were packed on the mule and buried them in the floor of that small cave and then made good their escape.

As they made their way through the Superstition Mountains they could see in from a distance the Apache in return watching them from rocks high above but they didn’t make any movement to attack. As the Lieutenant and Sergeant were near the Salt River and clear of the Superstition Mountains, the Apache attacked yet again. The warriors knew exactly where to lay the ambush and exactly where they had to exit the mountains and cross the Salt River. The Sergeant was shot out of his saddle and the Lieutenant just spurred his mount and made a desperate attempt to escape and rode straight through the ambush. He was now the only survivor and eventually made his way to Fort McDowell and reported what had occurred.

General Crook dispatched two or three companies of troopers to go with the Lieutenant to the place where he had buried the Pistols and to investigate the attack. The troopers gathered up the bodies (what was left of them) but the Lieutenant could not recall where the cave was located where he had buried the pistols. He was new to Arizona and didn’t know the terrain, the only ones in his escort party who did know the Mountains and trails and passes were killed during the attack. The soldiers continued searching while in frustration but with no results.

The exact cave was never located and the pistols were never recovered and still waiting to be found to this very day. If these pistols could be found they could fetch a nice price but more importantly, they would be a priceless link to our states beautiful and bloody history.

(While on your search please carry water with you and watch for rattle snakes as the temperatures grown higher and higher. Try to stay cool and always tell someone where you will be going and when to expect you home).

Categories: Arizona, artifacts, hidden, Legends, Lost Treasure, Old West, Treasure Hunters, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Legends | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Underground Railroad in Michigan..Michigan played an important role in the Underground Railroad of the 1840, 1850’s and 1860’s.


Monro House Jonesville Michigan and the Underground RailroadOne stop was in Union as stated in the article below.

Another was in Jonesville, Michigan at the Monro House.

The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 made it very dangerous and costly to help slaves escape the southern slavery condition.

Farmers and businesses stood the chance of legally losing their farms and businesses by helping Slaves escape to Canada.

Hiding places were built into homes, woodsheds and barns at the risk of losing it all to the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850.

The essay below by Mrs. Martha D. Aiken tells some of the story….

Union City

The time was 1843.

The place a small village in southern Michigan, and on the bank of one of its rivers flowing west was Station No. 2, Underground Railroad.

The station agent, known far and near as “The Squire,” stood in the door of his shop just below the bridge intently watching the approach of a large covered wagon of the style known to pioneers as “prairie schooners.”

“Possibly a train for my station,” mused he.

The team stopped, the driver, a white man, alighted, and followed by a small boy, black as ebony.

Hastening out, the alert station agent gave cordial greeting.

“What place is this?” asked the stranger.

On being told, he asked,

“Any Abolitionists here?”

“Thick as blackberries.”

“Where can I find one?”

“Look at me, friend, what wilt thou?”

“Food and shelter for man and beast.”

“Plenty of both to which you are welcome.

Cross the bridge, turn to the right.

I will follow immediately.”

“Ah! You don’t know what you are bargaining for,” pointing to the wagon.

Looking within the Squire saw a man of about fifty years, a woman and four children all of color contraband; the eldest, a boy of ten years, still standing by the driver, an interested listener.

“Not an unusual train for my station,” said the Squire.

“You are all welcome.”

“What ribber be dis, massa; be dis de Jordan what we sing of down in ole Car’line?” asked the boy.

“We may call it a branch of that river, since by crossing the bridge yonder you gain freedom for your body, while you must plunge in the other to rid yourself of sin,” said the Squire, smiling as he looked at the earnest face of the boy whose eyes sparkled as he turned toward the river.

“We have had a tiresome journey but it is evident we have reached a safe harbor at last,” remarked the man, who was none other than Augustus Wattles, famous in that day as the “Quaker Abolitionist,” whose home in Ohio was a refuge for escaped slaves, and who was conducting this company of refugees to Canada.

During the two days taken for rest and recuperation at Station No. 2, the story of the old man of the party, William Smith, a mulatto, was learned.

He was from North Carolina, the slave and also the son of Percival Nelms, a wealthy planter.

It was of such that Dickens wrote when he said:

“He dreamed of freedom in a slave’s embrace and waking, sold her offspring and his own in public markets.”

Although the relationship was well understood by this son, he had served as a slave for nearly fifty years.

That Nelms had some regard for him was made evident by the fact that he had never permitted the lash to touch him and had allowed him to learn to read and write.

He had also promised that before his death he would give him his freedom notwithstanding he was valued at $1,000.

Fifty years had passed when one morning William was called from the field for an interview with his father who said:

“William, the time has come for me to fulfill my promise to you; here are your manumission papers,” virtually a title deed to himself.

Hide your face, O Goddess of Liberty!

A title deed to a human being in this, our boasted land of freedom?”

“You have some money,” continued Nelms, “Here is more, take the horse, Hunter, and go; he knows the mountain passes and you will have no trouble in finding the way; but let it be inferred you are going on business for me as you have often been.

Go straight on, however, to Mercer County, Ohio, and give this letter to Augustus Wattles. You will find in him a friend.”

Now came a cruel struggle in the soul of the slave.

“Ought I to purchase freedom at such a price?

Can I leave my wife and children in bondage and flee to safety?”

The decision had to be made at once, and obeying the scriptural injunction, he made unto himself “friends of the mammon of unrighteousness.”

On an adjoining plantation lived Ralph Pemberton, between whom and the Nelms family there existed a deadly feud of long standing.

Taking advantage of this, William sought assistance from the enemy and not in vain, for here, thought Pemberton, is an opportunity, patiently waited for, to strike an effective blow.

William had several children, the eldest, Andrew, a strong, active man of twenty years and valued as a slave accordingly.

It being impossible to effect the freedom of all, the father, acting on Pemberton’s advice, determined to do his best for this boy, and a tripartite treaty was made, the parties being Smith, Pemberton and Andrew.

Smith was to go directly to Mercer County and on his arrival there, his free papers, which were regularly made out, with the seal of the county affixed, were to be so amended as to describe and apply to Andrew.

Thus altered they were to be sent with a letter of instruction to Pemberton; he would do the rest, and father and son should be reunited.

Thus comforted, William mounted Hunter in the morning and rode away, reaching the Quaker’s home without mishap.

There was at that time in Mercer County a small colony of Negroes, chiefly from North Carolina, who had been set free by their owners.

This colony was under the guardianship and protection of Augustus Wattles.

To him William revealed the plot for liberating his son, and it was entered into without delay; for although peaceful, law-abiding citizens, the Abolitionists were a law unto themselves in the matter of slavery, interpreting literally that clause which declares all men to be free and equal, no mention having been made as to color.

The important document was amended; the letter of instruction for Andrew was sent to Pemberton; then William Smith, now a refugee, with no proof of his liberation, started under the protection of the Quaker, with the Negro woman and her four children for Canada by way of Station No. 2, Underground Railroad.

Meantime the Nelms family had neither slumbered nor slept, and while putting on the appearance of dove-like innocence, were using the cunning of serpents and kept their enemy under their constant espionage.

The post-office was watched,—Smith’s letter to Pemberton opened, read, sealed and re-mailed.

The plan of the treaty had been that on receipt of the papers, Andrew should leave his master’s plantation, secrete himself in a place provided by his friend, where he would remain until the heat of pursuit was over, when he was to be orally instructed as to his course, given the coveted papers and sent on his way.

Into the hiding place Andrew was led and secreted; his place of concealment was changed from one dark corner to another; weeks passed, his restlessness and fear were lulled by plausible reasons for delay and fair promises.

At last, suspecting treachery, he discovered the paper, took it and under cover of night started for Ohio and liberty.

Unable to read or write, knowing almost nothing of the direction to follow, hiding by day and travelling by night, he finally reached the Blessed Refuge in Mercer County, hungry, footsore, and weary, having been taken up but once on suspicion of being a runaway slave; after the examination of his papers he was discharged without further trouble.

Up to the time of Andrew’s departure the policy of the Nelms family had been masterly inactivity, but they had not for an hour lost sight of their slave.

His several hiding places were known and also his flight before it was discovered by Pemberton.

Now was the time to pounce upon their foe, and they did it with all the severity permitted by law.

He was arrested, charged with running off a slave, a crime which in the estimation of slaveholders of that period was considered equal, if not worse than murder.

Abundant proof was in their possession and Pemberton was helpless in the hands of his powerful enemies.

A fine of $1,000 and costs of the suit was imposed.

Security for the amount being taken on his slaves, of which he owned twenty.

In return Perceval Nelms executed and conveyed to his arch enemy a title deed to the body of his grandson, Andrew Smith, according to the laws of North Carolina.

Four months had passed since the arrival of the big wagon which brought William Smith to Station No. 2.

November had come and he was still with the Squire, who on this particular morning was attending to business on the flats when an unusual sight attracted his attention, – three Negroes on foot led by a white man mounted on a beautiful thoroughbred, for which the South has always/s been famous.

A pair of capacious saddle bags—the suitcase of that early day— were thrown over the saddle.

“More wayfarers for my station,” said the Squire, hastening out to greet with friendly hand and cordial welcome the travelers.

“A goodly company you have under convoy,” said he; “an Underground Railroad train I presume.

Well, you have reached in safety a way station where you must rest and refresh yourselves.”

To all of this the stranger—Pemberton himself—gave acceptance with a low bow.

At that moment William dropped his tools and rushing out clasped one of the Negroes in his arms, exclaiming:

“Andrew, my son, bless the Lord!”

The situation was explained, the long expected son had arrived.

To emphasize his friendship, Pemberton dismounted and gave William a most friendly greeting and clasped Andrew in a close embrace.

A second Judas indeed!

Beguiling with kind words him whom he would betray.

On reaching the house the men, black and white alike, were ushered in and the horse led to the barn where the Squire diligently grooming him was interrupted by one of the Negroes greatly excited: “You don’ know who y’ hab in dat house,” he gasped.

“What do you mean, Pemberton is all right, isn’t he?” replied the Squire.

“All right! He de very debil; he gwine take Andrew back to slab’ry.

We know sumpin awful gwine to happen, for after dark las’ night we saw a hor’ble goblin hidin’ ‘hind a stump, and dat man he ketch us jes ‘fore we gets here.”

“Oh well! do not fear,” said the Squire.

“We will show him a play worth two of his; it wins every time, for freedom is a trump card here.”

Returning to the house, dinner was announced and Pemberton displayed his qualities as an entertainer.

Crafty, base and treacherous, his appearance was that of a cultured gentleman, and he was bright and witty.

It was not till night, when the enemy slept, that Andrew told his story.

After reaching Mercer County he had found work and was industriously engaged when one morning he felt a tap on his shoulder and saw before him a United States Marshal with warrant of arrest in one hand and a pair of handcuffs in the other, evidently considering Andrew a dangerous person to attack.

It developed that Pemberton on discovering Andrew’s flight armed himself to the teeth with bowie knife and revolver, mounted his horse, effected the perilous mountain passes and reached the Negro colony in Mercer County, evaded the vigilance of its guardian, Wattles, and without being himself discovered found Andrew who now in handcuffs was taken into court charged with one of the most dreadful crimes known at that time in our land of freedom—love of Liberty.

But the good old Quaker was on hand and proved sufficient for the occasion.

He found a flaw in the warrant large enough to let the captive through, who thus liberated lost no time in preparing to travel the road that led to Station No. 2, G. R. R.

He was accompanied by two trusty friends, contraband like himself.

There was in possession of the three a rusty knife and two ancient revolvers that might possibly go off.

The night was dark, but carefully instructed by the Quaker for their journey they started.

Morning came.

In a dingy, low-roofed log cabin inn, not far from the Mercer County Colony, there was one defeated sorrowful soul, a victim of the lawless scheming of Abolitionists.

That man was Pemberton, and in all that region not one so “poor as to do him reverence” nor give him information concerning his absconded property.

But the light of Underground Station No. 2 was not hidden, and riding swiftly he got on the track of the fugitives one mile east of that “Haven of Rest.”

They were now at the mercy of the law.

The title deed to personal freedom once possessed by William Smith was of course useless and equally useless for Andrew in whose interests it had been amended.

Here was a peculiar situation.

Under the same roof was Pemberton representing slavery, with the law to support him, and the Squire representing freedom, earnestly striving for the privileges which the world accords to men.

He remembered those great words of the Declaration:

“We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal;

That they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights;

That among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

And although the law was at this time opposed to this declaration, the Squire was supported by a body of able men who believed the law of God superior to the law of State and were ready to respond at a moment’s notice in defense of the oppressed.

On the retirement of Pemberton to his room that night these men were summoned to give counsel in this emergency, and before separating they knelt, beseeching the Father of mercies to give them wisdom and to shield the fugitives in their peril.

It was morning, and the Squire, calling Pemberton to breakfast, was bidden to enter:

“Look,” said the guest, “Aren’t these beauties?” pointing to his open saddle bags wherein lay a six cylinder Colt’s revolver and a murderous looking bowie knife with curved point and glistening blade.

“This has the lives of six men in it,” said he, taking up the revolver.

“Indeed,” replied the Squire, looking at it with the eye of a connoisseur.

“It looks like a good tool.”

“You may well say that.

I should be a hard customer to capture.”

Running his finger along the blade of the knife, with all the nonchalance he could command, the Squire replied:

“We think but little of such light implements in the North; we prefer the breech-loading rifle and do some nice shooting with it when occasion demands; but let us go to breakfast.”

The meal over, Pemberton accompanied Smith to the shop.

His scheme was to quiet Smith’s fears for the safety of his son, by reiterated professions of affection.

Andrew with his faithful guardsmen remained at the house watchful and wary.

At several meetings of the Abolitionists during the ten days of Pemberton’s stay he enlarged upon the direful consequences to himself should Andrew refuse to return.

He had already decided it would be impossible to seize him where Abolitionists were the ruling party.

“It will only be necessary,” he said, “for him to cross the border of the State to exonerate me from the charge of running off a slave, otherwise my slaves must be sold and their families broken up.”

Great tears rolled down his cheeks, to impress his listeners with the tender relations existing between himself and his slaves.

Is it a wonder that honest men believed and sympathized with him?

He gave the names of numerous titled men to verify his statements.

Generals, majors, judges and others were cited, to whom the Squire might refer.

Finally the Squire said: “Pemberton, give Andrew until December; we will meantime correspond with the gentlemen whom you have mentioned, and if they corroborate your statements we pledge ourselves to persuade Andrew to comply with your request; you in the meantime will be at liberty to return to your urgent business.”

To this proposition Pemberton gave ready assent.

An early breakfast was served; the departing guest with the manners of a Chesterfield bade adieu to the family, and grasping the hand of the host said:

“On the honor of a gentleman I swear to fulfill my part of this agreement,” and the declaration was accepted without question.

The day passed, another morning dawned, and breakfast was in progress at Station No. 2. Andrew’s faithful guards had gone.

He alone was gloomy and restless.

“What is the matter, Andrew?” asked the Squire.

“Don* know,” he replied.

“Fear de mattah,” said his father.

“Fear of what or whom?” asked the Squire.

“Slabeholders,—he think dey be arter him, and he neither eat nor sleep.”

“That being the case you shall go over the line into Canada, find work and if all is well, be ready to meet Pemberton as we have agreed,” was the Squire’s reassuring reply.

But among the Abolitionists who were too honest themselves to doubt the fair promises of Pemberton, there was one “Doubting Thomas.”

Henry Gage believed discretion to be the better part of valor.

Meeting Andrew’s friends after the departure of the enemy, he said:

“Now, friends, I think the best time to prepare for war is when everything is peaceful, and I want to know what we are to do if all those promises have been given us as sleeping powders?”

“It isn’t possible!” exclaimed all.

“Perhaps not,” said Gage, “But we are bound to protect Andrew, and should Pemberton return he must be held until Andrew is out of reach.

Squire, did he pay his board bill before leaving?”

“Board bill?

There was none.

He was my guest.”

“Well, guest, or no, if he returns, he must be held here for an unpaid board bill, until we get Andrew across the U. S. line.”

After much argument, that was agreed upon.

Down on the flats, not far from Station No. 2, was a big haystack, built on a rail foundation, where one could hide things animate or inanimate.

Andrew’s fears of capture increased hourly, so he was hid under the stack, to remain until removal was considered safe.

One morning as Andrew was resting contentedly in his retreat and the family was finishing breakfast at Station No. 2, bad news like a bomb was suddenly exploded in camp.

A horse wet and panting dashed to the door, and the rider breathless with excitement exclaimed, “Pemberton is coming!—an officer with him for Andrew!”

It was true. Pemberton had ridden to the county seat, secured the services of a United States Marshal, and provided with handcuffs as well as authority expected to make an easy capture.

Scarcely an hour passed after the alarm before the pursuers arrived.

Being admitted, Pemberton shouted:

“I have come for my property, and in the name of the law I demand that you produce him.”

“If the honest man whom you designate as your property had been as easily duped by your false promises as we were you might have found him here, but thanks to his knowledge of your treachery he is beyond your reach,” calmly replied the Squire.

Like match to powder the wrath of Pemberton blazed.

To be outwitted a second time by these hated Abolitionists was too great a humiliation to endure:

“I brand you as a set of outlaws, utterly regardless of the rights of others.

I’ll dare anyone of you to come.

I’m ready for you,” shouted Pemberton in wrath, as he tore off his coat and clenched his fists.

“We have a better way to settle our differences in this part of the country,” said the Squire.

“The law is our refuge.”

“And speaking of the law,” interposed Gage, “we are not accustomed to having strangers and aliens eat the bread of honest toil for a week and leave without offering to settle the bill, so you may consider yourself under arrest.

Here is proof of my authority,” throwing back his coat and showing his badge of office.

“Under arrest!” exclaimed Pemberton.

“Do you dare treat me with such ignominy?

Here, take your money.”

“Oh, no; we are quite systematic in our methods and settle matters legally; we will, however, attend to the business as soon as possible,” said Mr. Gage, “that you may start on your homeward journey.

Meantime the rooms you have occupied for the past ten days are at your disposal.”

Showing his unbounded wrath and indignation in unmistakable ways, Pemberton retired to those rooms more of a prisoner than he realized.

He could not seek relief by escape, since there were no railroads, and his horse with saddle bags and weapons were safely guarded in a locked barn.

While these events were taking place, Andrew down under the haystack was being comforted and reassured by Joe Bell, who often hunted on the flats.

On this particular morning he carried a remarkably large luncheon, and on pretense of resting from his long tramp through the fields he was putting the greater part of his food through the rails.

“Now boy, don’t you get worried,” he said.

“Mr. Gage has gone for the preacher and old Pompey, you will be safe with them.

By tomorrow you will be in Canada, where Pemberton can’t get you.

The Squire is keeping Pemberton here till you are out of his reach.”

Among the Abolitionists of the village was the Congregational minister, who not only could preach but work with equal energy for the protection of his fellow man; for he read, as did others, that all men are brothers, without specification as to color.

And so, responding to the summons of Mr. Gage, “Pompey,” a horse that had on other occasions traveled the road to freedom, was harnessed. In the wagon were two rifles, and in the preacher’s pockets plenty of ammunition and patent caps.

“Not that I expect to kill anyone,” said the preacher, “but my present business is Andrew’s safety, and anybody that interferes will get into trouble.”

There were two Underground railroad stations between No. 2 and Detroit.

At one of these Pompey was exchanged for a fresh horse.

Detroit was reached on the second day.

There Andrew was transferred to a boat and was soon a free man.

He remained in Canada for years, working faithfully until he accumulated considerable property.

He visited Station No. 2 once with his wife and two children.

His father, “Uncle Smith” as he was called by his many friends, still lived with the Squire.

There also “Uncle Smith” lived to see that blessed day when he and all his race were made free by the Emancipation Proclamation.

Categories: Civil War, hidden, Uncategorized | Tags: | Leave a comment

Don Joaquin’s Lost Gold..


Don Joaquin’s Lost Gold:

In 1847 a Mexican Army Officer named Don Joaquin led a small mining expedition into the Sierra Estrella Mountains in the hopes of finding rich gold or silver deposits. Like anyone with geology, military training and experience he located a very promising location to mine. As well as a defensive area to set up a camp not far from the mine.

The mine was producing well and with no problems to speak of except low food stores. Until one day a Gila river Pima scout ran into camp and told the commander that the American Army was moving along the Gila and will be soon heading to Pimeria Alta.
Pimeria Alta was Spanish Arizona and at that time modern Mexican settlements, ranches, Presidial’s-Forts, Pimeria Alta is located from pretty much Arizpe in Sonora all the way north to the Gila river. Tucson, San Xavier, Tubac, and other places of importance are within Pimeria Alta.

Realizing his situation, not having the security of reinforcements and his path south to Mexican settlements about to be cut off. He ordered his men to abandon the mine for the time being, pack up everything and make for a small butte nearby.
This butte is modern Butterfly Peak, the path they took to get there is known as the Zig Zag trail.
Don Joaquin made a tactical decision to hide all the gold with the help of one Indian laborer. So if in the event he and his party were to be captured by the approaching Americans that their gold would not become plunder for the enemy.

With the help of the Indian laborer, they moved half way down the trail into a type of box canyon where they found a small cave. Then they removed the gold from the mule packs and piled it up inside of a small cave (probably an alcove). It is said they hid 3,000lbs from the packs of 15 mules.

When the job was completed, Joaquin killed the Indian laborer and placed him inside with the gold ore and then sealed/walled up the cave with the intention to return. He quickly sketched a quick map of the canyon he was in near the butte, so he could easily recall the location of the walled up cave.

He joined up with his men later on the evening of the following day right before sunset. His men nervous about the on coming American Army, the threat they posed to their families south of the Gila and their commander taking his sweet time in hiding their wealth caused the men to make a quick but drastic decision. Upon Joaquin’s return his men killed him, took his crude map and quickly under cover of darkness made there way south to the northern most Mexican outpost, being Presidio San Augustine de Tucson.

For thirty five years no word of the lost gold was known until in 1882 a man arrived claiming to hold a old Mexican map and asking for a guide to take him to the areas the map depicted. His expedition was a quick one as the local natives quickly chased him out of that area and upon his return to Phoenix he soon returned south back to Mexico without ever finding the hidden gold.
To this day there are many stories and claims as to what happened to the man and the crude map.

This treasure is still out there and within the Sierra Estrella Mountains south of Phoenix. If this could be found, it would be not only a great payday but also a priceless window into the past.

(Please follow state, federal, reservation laws and respect private property. If you have any doubts at all, simply ask permission)

gold

Categories: artifacts, gold, gold coins, gold ingots, Gold Mine, hidden, Legends, Lost gold, Lost Mines, Lost Treasure, Mexico, placer gold, Spanish gold, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

WWII The Great Escape Read the last part of particular interest….


The Great Escape Untouched for almost seven decades, the tunnel used in the Great Escape has finally been unearthed.The 111-yard passage nicknamed ‘Harry’ by Allied prisoners was sealed by the Germans after the audacious break-out from the POW camp Stalag Luft III in western Poland.Despite huge interest in the subject, encouraged by the film starring Steve McQueen, the tunnel remained  undisturbed over the decades because it was behind the Iron Curtain and the Soviet authorities had no interest in its significance.

  https://gallery.mailchimp.com/80613535536129bb5df3a5d5a/images/60922e8c-1746-4025-9ae4-d3c91fdbea36.jpg

But at last British archaeologists have excavated it, and discovered its remarkable secrets.

  Many of the bed boards which had been joined together to stop it collapsing were still in position. And the ventilation shaft, ingeniously crafted from used powdered milk containers known as  Klim Tins, remained in working order.

Scattered throughout the tunnel, which is 30ft below ground, were bits of old metal buckets, hammers and crowbars which   were used to hollow out the route.

A total of 600 prisoners worked on three tunnels at the same time. They were nicknamed Tom, Dick and Harry and were just 2 ft square for most  of their length. It was on the night of March 24 and 25, 1944, that 76 Allied airmen escaped through Harry.

  Barely a third of the 200 prisoners many in fake German uniforms and civilian  outfits and carrying false identity papers, who were meant to slip away managed to leave before the alarm was raised when escapee number 77 was spotted.

https://gallery.mailchimp.com/80613535536129bb5df3a5d5a/images/cf98922a-43be-4a72-8f5f-b897f898860e.jpeg

Tunnel vision: A tunnel reconstruction showing the trolley system.

  Only three made it back to Britain. Another 50 were executed by firing squad on the orders of Adolf Hitler, who was furious after learning of the breach of security.   In all, 90 boards from bunk beds, 62 tables, 34 chairs and 76 benches, as well as thousands of items including knives, spoons, forks, towels and blankets, were squirreled away by the Allied prisoners to aid the escape plan under the noses of their captors.

Although the Hollywood movie suggested otherwise, NO Americans were involved in the operation.   Most were British, and the others were from Canada, (all the tunnelers were Canadian   personnel with backgrounds in mining) Poland, New Zealand, Australia, and South Africa.

  https://gallery.mailchimp.com/80613535536129bb5df3a5d5a/images/6adad9d2-6e1d-4715-833a-af25472257c4.jpg

  The site of the tunnel, recently excavated by British archaeologists . The latest dig, over three weeks in August, located the entrance to Harry, which was originally concealed under a stove in Hut 104.

The team also found another tunnel, called George, whose exact position had not been charted. It was never used as the 2,000 prisoners were forced to march to other camps as the Red Army approached in January 1945 .

Watching the excavation was Gordie King, 91, an RAF radio operator, who was 140th in line to use Harry and therefore missed out. ‘This brings back such bitter-sweet memories,’ he said as he wiped away tears. ‘I’m amazed by what they’ve found. ’

  https://gallery.mailchimp.com/80613535536129bb5df3a5d5a/images/b2840a8c-e750-4909-b9ea-966986b8a134.jpg

Bitter-sweet  memories: Gordie King, 91, made an emotional return to Stalag Luft III.

In a related post:

  Many of the recent generations have no true notion of the cost in lives and treasure that were paid for the liberties that we enjoy in this United States. They also have no idea in respect of the lengths that the “greatest generation” went to in order to preserve those liberties. Below is one true, small and entertaining story regarding those measures that are well worth reading, even if the only thing derived from the story is entertainment.

Escape from WWII POW Camps

Starting in 1940, an increasing number of British and Canadian Airmen found themselves as the involuntary guests of the Third Reich, and the Crown was casting about for ways and means to facilitate their escape..

Now obviously, one of the most helpful aids to that end is a useful and accurate map, one showing not only where stuff was, but also showing the locations of ‘safe houses’ where a POW on-the-lam could go for food and shelter.

  Paper maps had some real drawbacks — they make a lot of noise when you open and fold them, they wear out rapidly, and if they get wet, they turn into mush.

Someone in MI-5 (similar to America’s OSS) got the idea of printing escape maps on silk. It’s durable, can be scrunched-up into tiny wads and, unfolded as many times as needed and, makes no noise whatsoever.

  At that time, there was only one manufacturer in Great Britain that had perfected the technology of printing on silk, and that was John Waddington Ltd When approached by the government, the firm was only too happy to do its bit for the war effort.

By pure coincidence, Waddington was also the U.K. Licensee for the popular American board game Monopoly. As it happened, ‘games and pastimes’ was a category of item qualified for insertion into ‘CARE packages’, dispatched by the International Red Cross to prisoners of war.

  Under the strictest of secrecy, in a securely guarded and inaccessible old workshop on the grounds of Waddington’s, a group of sworn-to-secrecy employees began mass-producing escape maps, keyed to each region of Germany, Italy, and France or wherever Allied POW camps were located. When processed, these maps could be folded into such tiny dots that they would actually fit inside a Monopoly playing piece.

As long as they were at it, the clever workmen at Waddington’s also managed to add:

  1. A playing token, containing a small magnetic compass

2. A two-part metal file that could easily be screwed together

3. Useful amounts of genuine high-denomination German, Italian, and French currency, hidden within the piles of Monopoly money!

  British and American air crews were advised, before taking off on their first mission, how to identify a ‘rigged’ Monopoly set – by means of a tiny red dot, one cleverly rigged to look like an ordinary printing glitch, located in the corner of the Free Parking square.

Of the estimated 35,000 Allied POWS who successfully escaped, an estimated one-third were aided in their flight by the rigged Monopoly sets. Everyone who did so was sworn to secrecy indefinitely, since the British Government might want to use this highly successful ruse in still another, future war. The story wasn’t declassified until 2007, when surviving craftsmen from Waddington’s, as well as the firm itself, were finally honored in a public ceremony.

It’s always nice when you can play that ‘Get Out of Jail’ Free’ card! Some of you are (probably) too young to have any personal connection to WWII (Sep. ’39 to Aug. ’45), but this is still an interesting bit of history for everyone to know.

Categories: D Day, hidden, Uncategorized, War, WWII | 2 Comments

Leon Trabuco’s Gold….


Leon Trabuco’s Gold

In 1933, Leon Trabuco was a Mexican millionaire. He believed he could use the Great Depression of the United States to increase his fortune. Convinced the United States would soon devalue the dollar and that gold prices would skyrocket, Trabuco and four other men bought up much of Mexico’s gold reserves to resell in the United States when the price went up.

At a makeshift Mexican foundry, gold coins and jewelry were melted down and cast into ingots. In less than three months, he and partners had collected almost sixteen tons of solid gold. They smuggled the gold into the United States, where if caught, they faced long prison terms. Trabuco searched for a safe place to hide the illegal treasure, but eventually, he decided it would be smarter to bury the gold. In the heat of the summer, he hired a pilot named Red Moiser to make several covert flights into the New Mexico desert for Trabuco.

It is believed that Trabuco chose a sparsely populated region near the Ute and Navajo Indian Reservations in New Mexico. Moiser allegedly made sixteen flights, carrying one ton of gold each time, taking them to pick-up trucks that transported them to burial site. Trabuco never revealed the location and was careful not to create a map. When the Gold Reserve Act of 1934 passed, the price of gold soared, but instead they waited for prices to soar higher.

Unfortunately, the Gold Act of 1934 made private ownership of gold illegal, and Trabuco was unable to cash in on his scheme. Over the years, he and his partners all died untimely deaths. Trabuco took the location of the gold to the grave.

Treasure hunter Ed Foster has searched for Trabuco’s Treasure in the desert around Farmington, New Mexico for over thirty-five years. He is convinced that he found the 1933 landing strip used by Red Moiser at a plateau called Conger Mesa. He has spoken with an Native American lady and Navajo woman who was six years old in 1933 who both recalled a plane that would land and take-off from there. Ed said she remembered several Mexican men who lived on the Reservation.

He also found an old Navajo home unlike any other on the reservation about twenty miles west of the mesa. It was probably meant as a guard post to guard the gold. It is a Mexican-style structure with windows, a front door, a back door and a veranda. Not far away is Shrine Rock inscribed with a date and the words: “1933 16 Ton.” Ed believes the gold could be hidden away somewhere in the vicinity of these three points.
Treasure hunter Norman Scott believes Trabuco’s Treasure has an air of authenticity to it. He believes that with available technology, it is only a matter of time before it is discovered.

It is believed that the treasure consisted of Mexican gold bought by several millionaires.

Categories: gold, gold coins, gold ingots, hidden, Legends, Lost gold, Mexico, Old West, Treasure Hunters, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

139 Arizona treasure legends….


  1. In 1878 a wagon train was attacked in Chavez Pass 30 miles S.W. of Winslow and everyone except two of the party were massacred.  The two survivors said all of the valuables and cash of the wagon train were buried the night before the attack near the campsite and never recovered after the melee.  Even though the remains of the burnt wagons were found, the treasure wasn’t.
  2. A cache of gold dust and silver coins was secreted by Apache Indians after they attacked a wagon train a few miles N.E. of the stage station at Mountain Springs.  The dutch oven containing the treasure is hidden behind two rocks at the point of the Winchester Mountains N.E. of Wilcox.
  3. Two heavy bags of gold were buried by outlaws after a robbery.  Captured and sent to jail, they admitted the crime and gave these directions to the cache:  from Douglas, go north on a country road for 18 miles.  Where the road forks take it to the left leading in a westerly direction and continue for about 5 miles, then turn north again.  Straight ahead is a corral.  Go through two gates and follow this road 8-10 miles to a goat ranch.  From goat ranch:  about 200 yards up a canyon is a spring and old campsite.  Up this canyon, towards a dike, is the area where the loot was hidden. 
  4. Profits from the 250 acre Spade Ranch, established in 1883 by William Craig and Paul Vogel, are believed buried somewhere on the property located in a meadow on Webber Creek below the Mogollon Rim and near Pine. 
  5. In 1903, Jake Johnson and his brother were taken to a treasure cave, by a Paiute Indian, containing a vast quantity of Aztec gold and silver, from the south rim of the Grand Canyon.  They were blindfolded one day’s ride S of Pipe Spring and rode another 4 days.  At the base of the Grand Canyon they entered the cavern, where their blindfolds were removed.  The two men were allowed to take all the treasure they could carry, in return for their help in saving the life of the Indian’s wife.  They searched for years and could not find the cavern.
  6. The Nazi Germany war regime is said to have cached upwards of $300 million in the area of Chloride.
  7. 1870s—2 bandits robbed a stagecoach of an army payroll and stole $72,000.  The loot is believed buried in the vicinity of Canyon Station.
  8. Indians planned and made several attacks on emigrant trains in Secret Pass and buried a large store of weapons in a concealed cave.  The cave is located at the western or Colorado River side of Secret Pass where Thumb Butte is a prominent rock formation nearby.
  9. Spanish priests, in charge of a wagon train enroute from Mexico to California, were loaded with everything needed to establish a new mission including, chalices, candlesticks, crosses, vestments and other church articles.  Indians forced them to conceal the treasures in a cave in the area of Secret Pass and then the party was attacked and massacred.  Two nuns escaped the foray and returned to Mexico to tell of the tragedy.
  10. In the 1880’s, 5 bandits robbed a saloon in the booming mining camp of Mineral
    Park. While escaping, they robbed a stagecoach of a strongbox containing 400
    pounds of gold bars, dust and nuggets and the passengers of additional valuables.
    The strongbox was too heavy to take with them and in their haste, pushed it off to
    the side of the road and covered it with dirt. A posse caught up with the gang
    shortly afterwards and killed them all. The posse found the stagecoach and its
    passengers not far from Topock and all made a thorough search for the gold, but
    nothing was ever found. The location is along the Yucca-Needles stage road to the W of the Yucca Stage Station.
  11. The above coins may or may not have  come from a cache made by 4 outlaws who robbed the Sante Fe train in 1889, 34 miles E of Flagstaff.  The loot was taken up Canyon Diablo to  a cedar thicket where the spendable loot was divided and the diamond jewelry and separated rifles and watches buried on the rim. The outlaws then separated.
  12. “Long Tom” Watson found some old papers in 1910 in a cabin written by outlaws
     that told of a cache of gold nuggets hidden behind a waterfall that exists only in the  spring of the year in the vicinity of Havasupai Village in the Grand Canyon. The site is W of the old Tanner Trail in the Grand Canyon, about 4 miles N of Hwy. 64. He began his search in 1912, and after 2 years of futile searching was on his way out of  the canyon to the Arizona strip via the old Horse Thief Trail from Morgan Point  where he saw a falls. Behind it was a cave and, inside, a bushel of gold nuggets.  As he was about to leave, he fell and broke his leg, but managed to get to the  Buggelin Ranch, leaving the treasure behind. When he recovered, he made numerous attempts to relocate the cave and waterfall, but failed. In disgust, Watson later committed suicide and the story became legend.
  13. The owner of an Indian trading post N of the peaks from Flagstaff during the 1800’s
    buried the profits from his store in jars and cans around the fences on his property. The caches are believed to have numbered in the hundreds, many of which are still awaiting discovery to this day.
  14. An outlaw cave is located to the W of this trading post, possibly in the North Frisco
     Peak region, where it it believed a large cache of gold coins remains unrecovered.
  15. $100,000 in outlaw loot was buried by Curly Walker near his stone fort-like
    headquarters in the N end of the Painted Desert. The ruins are still visable and,  somewhere nearby, the unrecovered cash.
  16. In the 1880’s, 7 outlaws of the Valenzuelo gang were killed by lawmen at Mexican
    Pocket S of Flagstaff and another five bandits escaped, only to be killed later. The 12 bandits buried their shares of loot from series of rich hauls in separate caches
    and contained in saddlebags here and were never able to return to recover them.
    Shortly after the shooting spree, 2 separate caches were found; one contained
    $5,000 in gold and silver coins, a few years later, $8,000 was found in saddlebags in another cache in the same area. It was presumed that another 10 caches of outlaw loot with a face value of some $80,000 remains buried in separate places in
    Mexican Pocket.
  17. A cache of stagecoach loot was buried by a lone bandit at Viet Spring near
    Flagstaff. The outlaw was killed in a gunfight and the treasure was never recovered.
  18. On May 10, 1881, 5 outlaws robbed the Canyon Diablo-Flagstaff stage about 30
    miles E of Flagstaff. Two mail sacks were taken containing two 5-gallon oak kegs
    packed with a Wells Fargo shipment of gold ingots and coins cosigned to a San
    Francisco bank. The gold was worth $125,000. The bandits made good their escape and holed up in a log cabin at a place later called Viet Spring. A posse trailed the gang and trapped them at the cabin. In the shootout, all the bandits were killed and a search of the area made, but no gold was found. Many fruitless searches have been made for this cache over the years until a local man, Jim McGuire, suddenly started spending $50 gold coins at the saloon. McGuire was not a wealthy man and boasted that he “found” the coins. When he died suddenly, a search of his cabin turned up nothing and it is presumed that he had indeed found the stagecoach loot but only took a few coins from the cache at a time. The treasure still awaits recovery. 
  19. Roy Gardner was a train robber and gunrunner who started his crime career in 1906. He concealed $16,000 in gold coins in the cone of an extinct volcano near Flagstaff before he was captured during a train robbery in 1921 and sent to prison.  His cache was never recovered.
  20. In 1878, outlaws attacked a packed train loaded with silver bars enrouted from the Stonewall Jackson Mine at McMillenville. Each of the 25 mules carried 2 huge ingots which weighed 190 pounds each.  Taking over the mules, they turned NW from the Globe Trail and moved the train into the Mogollon Moutains in Navajo County . Seeing that they were being followed by Indians, the outlaws led the caravan to the area of Little Valley ( Clark Valley ) where the silver was cached in an old 40-foot-deep mine shaft on the side of the slope and covered over. The bandits were killed in an shootout and the treasure was never recovered. The search are for this hoard is believed to be within 1 mile of the lower end of Lake Mary on the rim of Little Valley in the San Francisco Mountains.
  21. During the winter of 1881, outlaws Henry Corey and Ralph Gaines stole 8 gold bars, each 3 feet long by 4 inches, from the old Tip Top Mine near (GT) Gillette. They holed up in an abandoned cabin on Rogers Lake and buried the bars near the cabin. They went to Flagstaff, held up a stagecoach of $25,000 in gold and silver coins and returned to the cabin. They dug up the gold bars and, together with the stage loot which was placed in wooden kegs, they chopped a hole in the ice and lowered the treasure into the lake. When the sheriff learned that the pair was at Rogers Lake, a posse set out to capture them. At their approach, Corey and Gaines managed to make a hasty escape, leaving the treasure behind. Gaines was killed in a brawl and Corey was arrested during a holdup near Globe and sent to prison. When Corey was released 24 years later, he and a friend made repeated searches for the loot but it was never found. Corey died in 1936. During certain times of the year, a search can be made on the dry lakebed.
  22. In 1879, four outlaws robbed a stage near Gila Bend and made off with $125,000 in gold coins and 22 gold bars stamped “AJO”. The next day, the same gang robbed another stage near Stanwix Station obtaining 2 chests containing $140,000 in gold coins and $60,000 in currency. Fleeing northeastward when the posse trailed them into the Tonto Basin country, than northwestward when the posse finally overtook them. In the shootout, 2 of the gang were shot and killedand the other 2 escaped, making their way to Holbrook where they waited for things to quiet down. Here, one of the bandits was killed in a poker game and the other, Henry Tice, in a fit of anger, shot and killed the gambler. An irate made a quick job of justice and killed him.
    The search area for this huge store of treasure has centered around the cliffs between Mormon Lake and Flagstaff. All efforts to locate this hoard have failed.
  23. William Ashurst owned a ranch near a good spring, now known as Ashurst Run, 25 miles SE of Flagstaff. He is known to have buried a number of 5 and 10 pound lard cans full of gold coins somewhere on the property that were never recovered after his death.
  24. Outlaws headed by Henry Seymour robbed a stagecoach in 1879 of $225,000 in newly-minted coins contained in 3 boxes at the Pine Spring Station located between Beaverhead Station and Brigham City. They took the gold into the station where they holed up just as a 20-man posse arrived. After a day long standoff, the posse set fire to the rear wall of the structure and routed the outlaws who were gunned down within a few yards of the station. The posse then put the fire out and searched for the gold, but it was never found. The hoard of gold coins remain buried somewhere in or near the old Pine Springs Station. 
  25. Herman Wolf operated a trading post for 30 years on the Little Colorado River between 1869-1899. The highly profitable business brought him tens of thousands of dollars in gold and silver coins. During all of this time, he is known never to of banked a single penny, but in 1899, Wolf decided to bring $100,000 in gold to the Flagstaff bank for deposit, but died before he did so. His 30-year accumulation was estimated to total some $250,000 and remains buried somewhere near his old store on the Little Colorado River just off the California-Sante Fe Trail near Canyon Diablo.  Only small portions of his hoard has ever been found, and that nearer to the store than the location which he confided to a close friend not long before he died. A bucket of Mexican silver and 20 U.S. gold coins were found in 1966 and 1901 respectively and is but a mere part of his treasure. The main cache still eludes seekers.
  26. East of the Canyon Diablo trading post on the other side of Hwy. 40 near the Meteor Crater is Diablo Canyon which stretches about 50 miles N and S and ends in the San Franciso Wash. In the northeastern area of Diablo Canyon, about 7 miles S of Two Guns in the late 1920’s, an old Apache Indian told the story of an old Indian ambush on a group of white miners near Meteor Crater and killed them all. After the attack, no gold nuggets were found and the Indians presumed the hoard cached before or during the battle. The aged Indian told of a stone corral and a stone structure, some sort of cabin.
    In the 1930’s another Indian reported seeing the stone corral and cabin but was unaware of the treasure and did not search for it.
  27. In 1878, a wagon train was attacked in Chavez Pass, 30 miles SW of Winslow and everyone except 2 of the party were massacred. The two survivors said that all the valuables and cash of the train were buried the night before the attack near the campsite and never recovered after the melee. Even though the remains of the burnt wagons were found, the treasure wasn’t.
  28. A treasure known  as the Lost Ledge of the Lone Ace Desert Rat is located near Skull Valley NW of Prescott.
  29. An early resident of Chino Valley, about 20 miles N of Prescott, is believed to have buried a large quantity of gold coins and nuggets somewhere in or near his cabin before he died. His treasure has never been recovered.
  30. Mose Casner operated a ranch in Beaver Creek Canyon near Rimrock and accumulated a fortune of $100,000 which he buried on his ranch in 5 dutch ovens, each containing $20,000 and each buried in separate locations. Casner died without revealing the location of his money and it was never recovered.
    Another source claims that Casner bored holes in several pine trees and cached hoards in his “tree banks,” then plugged the holes. This source claims that one such tree near his house yielded $1.000 in gold coins and another, in Beaver Creek Canyon, contained rolls of currency.
  31. For 50 years during the 1800’s, Sycamore Canyon was used as a hideout by outlaws and cattle rustlers. It is believed that a large number of treasure caches from these sources remain buried and hidden in this vicinity.
  32. Numerous bottles filled with gold were hidden in an orchard in Cottonwood during the peak of the Jerome mining days by two miners by the name of Marvin and Dreher. 3 of these bottles were found by a young boy in 1961, but it was a small sampling of what remains.
  33. 38 bars of gold, stolen in Mexico by a man named Hashknife Charley, were buried somewhere between a  spring and the boundary line between Arizona and Sonora near Sonoyta on the Arizona side of the border. The valuable cache was never recovered as Charley died in jail while serving a prison term for stealing horses.
  34. The Treasure of Zonia, a hoard consisting of bars and bullion from a Mexican pack train and sacks of Mexican gold and silver coins and some church treasure, is buried in the vicinity of Yava between Kirkland and Hillside on Hwy. 96. It has never been recovered.
  35. In 1876, 2 bandits robbed the stagecoach from the Vulture Mine of $40,000 in gold bars which they sawed into chunks in order to carry it. Government men were immediately on their trail and the outlaws were shot and killed in Thompson Valley. Part of the loot was recovered several days later and indications are that the remainder was hidden in the mountains somewhere between the Vulture Mine and where the town of Hillside is located today. It has yet to be found.
  36. The Golden Cup Treasure is located on Rich Hill.
  37. While being pursued by lawmen, 2 Mexican outlaws dumped $30,000 in raw gold on a pinnacle between Japanese Wash and Weaver Creek near Stanton. The hoard was never recovered.
  38. Precillano Ruiz had a rich placer mine somewhere near Wickenburg in the Black Rock Mining District. Over a period of time he extracted $50,000 in gold and silver which he kept hidden in or near his mine. He was killed around 1890 and his claim taken over by others. His cache of treasure was never found and remains somewhere near his mine, now known as the Monte Christo, a short distance from the Constellation Mine in the area near the Bradshaw Mountains and adjacent to Rich Hill, Stanton, Weaver and Octave.
  39. In 1870, bandits attacked a pack train carrying silver bullion from border smelters at Coalmine Springs near Alto. The bullion has never been recovered and, beacause of the weight of the treasure, it is believed to be cached somewhere in the area of the holdup.
  40. The stongboxes of at least 2 stagecoach robberies are believed buried somewhere on the slopes of Granite Mountain NW of Prescott.
  41. In the 1800’s, a party of successful prospectors were returning from the Big Sandy River to Prescott with a considerable amount of gold dust and nuggets contained in canvas bags. Stopping at Granite Dells for water in a spring that was located down in a ravine, they were attacked by Indians. The gold was hastily buried near the spring as the battle went on. All of the men were killed except one who made good his escape. The lone survivor returned to the site on several occasions with a search party later, but they never found any signs of the gold cache. It is surmised that the Indians dug up the tresure and reburied it somewhere else in the same area.
  42. The treasure known as Yaeger’s Lost Gold is located near Yaeger Canyon in Javapai County.
  43. “Red” Jack Almer buried $8,000 in gold coins in the vicinity of Prescott.
  44. A chest containing some $100,000 in gold was buried by a miner being folowed by hostile Indians under a boulder shaped like kneeling man. The site was near a spring at the foot of a mountain past which a stream flowed into a small valley near Prescott. In a tree a few feet away he marked a cross above a half circle. The cache of gold has never been recovered.
  45. $75,000 in gold bars is buried in the area of Prescott.
  46. Oscar Johnson was a recluse-miner living in McCabe. He hoarded his wealth and buried it somewhere in or near his cabin. Johnson mysteriously disappeared and neither he, nor his money, was ever found. Most all agree that his treasure remains buried somewhere near the cabin and yet to be found.
  47. In 1864, miners struck a rich placer of gold desposit on Lynx Creek E of Prescott, washing out about $30,000 in nuggets packed in 5 buckskin pouches. Between Lynx Creek and Prescott, the party was attacked and killed by 2 Indians who took the gold and headed for the mountains. Within 3 hours, a posse set out after them, and about 10 miles from the scene of the attack, overtook and killed them. The posse did not find any gold and they believed that it had been buried or hidden somewhere enroute by the robbers. It has yet to be found.
  48. Some legends say that Montezuma’s Aztec treasure hoard, removed from Mexico during the Cortez conquest in the 1500’s, is buried in a great sink hole known locally as Montezuma’s Well, near the ancient cliff dwelling’s known today as Montezuma’s Castle.
  49. A treasure known as the Silver of the Dead Apache is located in the Bradshaw Mountains E of Prescott.
  50. 200 pounds of raw gold lies at the bottom of a creek near the junction of Slate and Sqaw Creeks close to (GT) Bumble Bee.
  51. An Apache Indian living in Bronco Canyon often traded gold nuggets at the store at Fort McDowell. Two prospectors went to the canyon and set up camp in Bronco Canyon  and prospected the area. One day they found a rich vein of gold quartz showing signs of having been worked. The men worked the vein, taking out between $70,000 and $80,000 in gold which they stored under a huge rock near their camp. Preparing to leave the site because winter was upon them, a party of Apaches swooped down and attacked killing one of the men while the other managed to escape. The survivor waited until the Indians were subdued but by that time he was in his 80’s. Before he could return to the site, he fell ill and on his deathbed told of the story of gold and rich mine. Several years later, a Mexican sheepherder told of finding the campsite in Bronco Canyon but didn’t know of the mine or treasure cache. Others, too, have reported seeing a crude arrastre in the same region, but the mine and cache, located about 4 miles E of (GT) Bumble Bee, has yet to be found.
  52. Black Canyon Hill is located 38 miles S of Prescott on Hwy. 49. The place was a dangerous spot on the old stage road and many holdups took place here. It is believed that some of the stolen loot from these robberies may still remain buried in the area.
  53. Henry Seymour was a blacksmith in (GT) Gillett. In 1882, he held up 3 different stagecoaches on the outskirts of town, obtaining a total of $69,000. He was caught trying to hold up a fourth stage and was sent to prison, all the time refusing to reveal where he had hidden the loot. After he was released from prison he dropped from sight and never returned to Gillett to recover his treasure.
  54. Miners Samuel Walcott and James McNally had a gold ledge somewhere in or around Blue Canyon in Black Mountain. When they were killed in the 1880’s, the location became lost. Before they were killed by attacking Indians, the miners buried 200 pounds of gold near the mouth of Tsegi Canyon in Marsh Pass off Black Mountain. The cache is located up the canyon and buried somewhere betwen the creek running through it and the cliff-like wall not far from the present-day trading post on Hwy. 163.
  55. Returning from the California gold fields in 1855 with $300,000 in gold , a prospector named Darlington and his family were heading for their home in Illinois. When they reached the Sunset Crossing of the Little Colorado River, his wife took ill and died. She was buried in a box built by the post trader at Sunset Crossing and was so heavy that it took six men to lower it and leveled it off to resemble the terrain. Years later it was learned that Darlington had placed half of his gold, $150,000, in the coffin as his wife’s share. It’s still there.
  56. An oxcart heavily loaded with gold plates, bowls and other items was placed in a cave in the cliffs and covered over after Indians attacked a group of early-day Spaniards. The cave is located W of the Rock Point trading post and past the formation called Rock Point. The search area is just around the hill from the top of the mesa.
  57. A small party of prospectors recovered $75,000 from a rich gold deposit in the late 1800’s on the Navajo Indian Reservation. Pursued by irate Indians, the miners finally escaped, taking a hard, round-about journey from the area. One by one they died from exhausution until only one was left and, he too, was dying. He said that the gold was buried under a boulder shaped like a kneeling man at the foot of a mountain in a small vally that contained a small stream near Prescott. Subsequent searches failed to find the gold even though the landmarks were located.
  58. One suggested location of Alec Toppington’s Bear Cave Treasure is in the Carrizo Mountains.
  59. 3 Navajo Indians knew the location of a cave whose floor was littered with gold nuggets and ingots in the 1860’s. The Indians took Henry Adams, operator of the trading post at Fort Defiance, to the cave blindfolded. The cave was to the SW and up a steep hill from the base of a towering cliff. Adams saw 3 peaks nearly identical in size and shape looking out from the cave entrance, then he was blindfolded again and led from the cave, one night’s travel from Fort Defiance. Adams sold his store and searched for years for the treasure cave without success. After running out of money and grubstake friends, he killed himself. Some researchers believ the treasure cave is located in the cliffs N of Indian Wells.
  60. Profits from the 250-acre Spade Ranch, established in 1883 by William Craig and Paul Vogel, are believed buried somewhere on the property located in a meadow on Webber Creek below the Mogollon Rim and near Pine.
  61. Local residents fleeing the area because of Indian uprisings buried a large Mexican-Spanish treasure in the vicinity of Globe in the middle 1800’s. The cache was never recovered.
  62. The Sunlit Cave Treasure, consisting of several tons of Spanish gold bullion, is located on the Arizona side of the Colorado River, 15-20 miles S of Ehrenberg.
  63. Zuni Indians hid a cache of gold and silver and some church vessels in a cave under the mesa during the Indian Rebellion of 1680 somewhere in the area starting S of Lupton to the N Mexican border. Legends say that this treasure was never recovered. The Yuma Indians are said to have brought out gold nuggets from Cibola Cave, 50 miles N of Yuma in the Trigo Mountains.
  64. William B. Rood owned a ranch on the E side of the Colorado River, about halfway between Yuma and La Paz as the crow flies and between the area of Walker and Draper Lakes, except on the E side of the river. Rood drowned while crossing the river in 1870 and it was widely known that he had various amounts of gold coins hidden on the ranch, called Rancho de los Yumas. He was a very wealthy man, but only a few hundred dollars was found after his death. Various relatives, and others, searched for his caches at different times, but there were no reports of any recoveries. In 1897, Alfredo Pina dug up a baking powder tin containing $960 in gold coins.  Another small cache is believed to have been found by Leonardo Romo. The recovered caches are but a small portion of what is still awaiting recovery. The remains of the old ranch buildings can still be located. 
  65. A blacksmith working a small shop at Middle Well, located just N of a sand road that runs midway between the Castle Dome and Kofa Mountains, skimmed high grade gold ore from passing wagons and buried the gold in a cellar dug beneath the floor of his blacksmith shop. He died of a heart attack and the highgraded treasure went unrecovered. In the 1960’s, treasure hunters searched the area and found many relics and bottles, but no gold.
  66. Wealthy Mexican Don Jose Maria Redonda came to Arizona and built a vast estate about 15 miles N of Yuma in the Gila Valley, naming it the Hacienda de San Ysidro. He added to his fortune over the years from his ranch and winery and also owned a number of stores in Yuma. When his vast estate was divided by the government in 1874, Redondo abandoned the Hacienda and moved to Yuma. Rumors had it that a huge fortune remained buried on the estate and seekers flocked to the site, literally tearing it apart but no known treasure was found. Rumors persist today that a large treasure remains buried somewhere on the property.
  67. The Lost Treasure consists of some 50 pounds of gold nuggets and is located near the present Laguna Dam. Indians reportedly ambushed and killed a group of miners and threw their bodies and the gold into a gorge in the hills.
  68. Indians attacked the mission and the gold and other tresures were gathered by the Padres and taken across the Colorado River to the Arizona side and buried close to a peak known today as Sugar Loaf, or Sqaw Peak. A second version says the treasure was buried in a cave on the face of the peak.
  69. Near a prominent army camp used for desert training during WWII in a mountainous area at a flat base fronting a vertically-faced wall of volcanic rock are two stacks of 220 gold bars that were discovered in the 1940’s by 5 trainees assigned to the camp. The site is near Yuma and was lost by those who originally found it.
  70. John Glanton was a scalphunter who was forced out of Mexico when he was caught selling Mexican scalps as being Apache to the government. At Yuma crossing, Glanton met Able Lincoln and joined him in a profitable ferry business that grossed $20,000 per month. Not happy with that, Glanton robbed California gold seekers and killed them if they resisted. Indians attacked the crossing one night and killed both Glandon and Lincoln while a third ferryman escaped. He later stated that Lincoln had $50,000 in silver coins and between $20,000 and $30,000 in gold coins which he kept buried someplace near his camp. Glanton is believed to have had a similar fortune which he believed to have been buried in the thickets on the W bank of the river, placing it in California. After the massacre, the governor sent an expedition to the Crossing to protect the travelers, punish the Indians and recover the treasure. The venture cost the state over $110,000 and they did not find a cent of the Glanton-Lincoln hoard.
  71. According to an ancient map, a cache of gold treasure is supposedly buried somewhere in Spook Canyon in the Gila Mountains, about 5 miles SE of the once-rich Fortuna Gold Mine.
  72. The English pirate Thomas Cavendish stripped several Spanish galleons of their treasure in the late 1500’s. One of his vessels, the Content,loaded with tons of gold and silver, mysteriously disappeared and is believed to lie under the desert sands while the mutinous crew tried sailing the vessel up the Colorado River with the hiijacked treasure and became caught in a tidal wave and swept far inland.
  73. A large cache of gold and silver coins is hidden on the Colorado River near the Pima Indian villages near Yuma.
  74. A gold miner returning to the East from the California gold fields with $40,000 in nuggets was robbed along the El Camino del Diablo in the 1850’s. The outlaws are believed to have fled into the Tinajas Atlas Mountains to a hideout and it is a good possibility that some of this, and probably additional caches of loot, was buried there. Numerous outlaws and highwaymen used the basins in the Tinajas Atlas Mountains as a hideaway any many caches of loot and treasure are believed secreted in the region.
  75. Around 1933, a Mexican couple was traveling illegally towards Wellton from Mexico and crossing the Gila Mountains along one of the old Indian trails, about 1/2 day’s hike from Tinajas Atlas. As they came through a small pass and started down the E side of the Gilas, they saw what looked like a piece of burlap flapping in the wind from behind a sand dune. Upon investigating, they found a cave nearly hidden by the dune and, inside, about a dozen wooden crates full of Winchester .30-.30 carbines dated 1903. Leaving the cache they continued on their journey, were caught by government officers and forced to return to Mexico. The rifles have never been recovered.
  76. The Nazi Germany war regime is said to have cached millions of dollars in war treasure in an area between Yuma and Lukeville. A similar Nazi war cache was recently recovered near Lima, Peru and lends credence to its existence.
  77. A treasure from a wagon train massacre is buried W of O’Neil Pass near Papago Well.
  78. $140,000 in gold coins, stolen from a stagecoach in which 6 people were massacred in 1871 about 9 miles W of Wickenburg, is believed buried very near the hold-up scene. The robbery was supposed to be an “inside job” with only the $140,000 and a shovel missing from the stage even though other treasure and valuables were on board. Law men found  the shovel lodged between some rocks, about 300 yards from the exact massacre site which is today marked by a monument. One source places this treasure N of Hwy. 60-60 on a dry mesa near an arroyo between 2 hills in a wash. It has never been recovered.
  79. GT: Vulture City, near the Vulture Gold Mine, 12 miles from Wickenburg on the road to Buckeye and Aguila. Robberies, Murder and rape were a frequent occurance in Vulture City. The gold mine was robbed of bars on numerous times and much treasure is believed to remain hidden in and around the region. Wells Fargo chests, carrying the gol from the mines on stages were robbed so often that the carrier’s lives were always on the line.  Highgrading was rampant in the area of the Vulture Mine during its heyday and at least 8 men are known to have been hanged for their stealing and this, too, added to numerous caches that were hidden in the region. Old timers say that as much as $8 million was highgraded from the area mines and never reported. The main gold ore body has never been found at Vulture City. $17 million in gold has already been recovered from the mines, but the mother lode source of this ore, speculated to be worth many times that amount, still awaits discovery.
  80. The Valenzuela outlaw gang buried $25,000 in gold bars in the area of Wittman. It has never been recovered.
  81. Grocery heiress Marjorie Jackson was murdered at Indianapolis, Indiana. in the late 1970’s. F.B.I. agents recovered $1.4 million in cash in the desert, 20 miles N of Phoenix and believe that an additional $1 million to $6 million in cash, stolen from her home, is still buried in the same general area.
  82. The treasure known as the Royal Treasure is located in the general area NW of Phoenix.
  83. A cave of treasure lies in the vicinity of Hidden Valley in the Salt River Mountains, or South Mountains, on the outskirts of Phoenix. The hoard was seen in the early 1900’s and one $50 gold slug was removed. The opening is now believed covered over by fallen rocks and natural washing.
  84. The Lost Epileptic Gold Mine and a hidden cache of gold bars worth $50,000 nearby in the Estrella Mountains.
  85. In 1878, two Mexican prospectors found a rich gold ledge in the Estrella Mountains and worked out an estimated $50,000 in gold which they buried nearby. Pima Indians discovered them and attacked, killing one of the men and wounding the other. The injured man reached Tucson but died before he could lead another party to the site. The mine and $50,000 in mined gold was never found and still awaits seekers high in the canyons of the Estrella Mountains SW of Phoenix.
  86. A Mexican bandit murdered the station keeper at Burke’s Station in an effort to learn the location of the hidden strongbox in the 1870’s. The money chest was never found and is believed to remain somewhere in the immediate vicinity of the old stage stop, just off the Agua Caliente road, a short distance E of the road on the S bank of the Gila River. The location on topographic maps is Township 5, Range 10, Section 28.
  87. The Aztecs took millions of dollars from the streams, rivers and mountains of Mexico in ancient times. There is an abundance of evidence that during the conquest by Cortez, a huge store of treasure was carried from today’s Mexico City to the north and buried in a cave, possibly in Arizona. Some sources speculate and legends say that the tons of Aztec gold is buried somewhere near the mountain known as Montezuma’s Head.
  88. Don Joaquin Campoy worked a rich vein of gold in 1847 inthe Sierra Estrella Mountains W of Phoenix. When he heard rumors of approaching American soldiers and a possible war with Mexico in the brewing, he loaded 50 bars of gold and 30 rawhide sacks of gold dust on mules and headed them up a trail toward Butterfly Peak, then down another trail that followed a high ridge from Montezuma’s Head. Somewhere along this trail it is presumed that Campoy turned off into a small box canyon and found a shallow cave where he buried the gold. He died before he could recover his hoard and it remains buried to this day.
  89. The Lost Treasure of Telegraph Pass, a cache of $50,000 in coins and jewelry contained in an iron pot, was buried in 1870 at the S end of the Estrella Mountains below Montezoma’s Head in a level campsite with a small butte on the E side, not far from Telegraph Pass.
  90. A hoard of gold bars, said to total between $1 million and $2 million, remains buried in a cave near Montezuma’s Head.
  91. The Lost Ortega Mine is located somewhere in the Sierra Estrella Mountains. A group of Mexicans worked the mine using hired Pima Indians as laborers during the Mexican-American War. The mine was located in a short, deep box canyon on the E side of the range and about halfway between 2 high peaks and high up the mountainside. When word was received that a force of U.S. soliders were in the area, Ortega covered over the mine entrance and concealed the mined gold in a small cave nearby. Ortega died within days of the treasure burial and the mine, nor the cache, was ever located in later years. The search area is just W of the Santa Cruz River in a line between St. John’s Mission and Montezuma Peak W of Phoenix.
  92. A wagon train consisting of 14 well-to-do families made its way towards the California gold fields in 1849. One of the wagons carried their accumalated fortunes to start a new life, some $50,000 in a chest. Each night, the chest was buried for safekeeping along the route within the circle formed by the wagons. Ever since leaving San Antonio, Texas, the party was plagued by Indian troubles and when the party camped for the night near the natural formation known as Montezuma’s Head in Arizona, a band of Apaches attacked, killing every member of the group. The treasure, buried the night before, was never found, even though subsequent searches were made by wagon trains who came upon the scene of the massacre and modern-day searches as well.
  93. An Apache chief named White Horse related that a wagon train of Spaniards came to the Superstition Mountains and chose Weaver’s needle as the place to bury a store of gold bars , jewels, statues and other artifacts. He stated that they climed the Needle and deposited the huge cache inside a cave near the top, then sealed the entrance. The Indians then attacked the Spaniards and killed them all. The sealed cave has never been found.
  94. The Lost Jesuit Treasure, worth an estimated $6 million, is located in the Superstitions. The hoard, possibly in 3 tunnels leading to 3 mines, was secreted when the priests were expelled in 1767.
  95. In 1976, famous western artist Ted DeGrazia of Tucson announced that he had concealed more than 100 original artworks inside a tunnel somewhere in the Superstition Mountains, 40 miles E of Phoenix. he said he hid the paintings, valued from $3,000 to well over $30,000 each, in order to keep his heirs from having to pay well over $1 million in taxes upon his death.
  96. In the late 1880’s, the stage on the Florence-Pinal Wells route was robbed of an $85,000 payroll bound for the old Pinal Silver Mine. The holdup took place along the stage road at a bend in Queen Creek about 3 miles E of Hewitt’s Station, located in a canyon now named after it and E of Comet Creek, about 12 miles NW of Old Pinal Town. The bandits rode off  to the W following Queen Creek and were caught by a posse about 10 miles down the creek and off to the hills around Comet Peak. One of the outlaws was shot and killed, another escaped and the third was badly wounded. The dying man confessed that the loot was, “…buried along the trail under a palo verde tree.” A search was made, but nothing was found.
  97. In the early 1860’s, Andrew Pauly found a cave in some red cliffs N of Maricopa Wells near a large needle rock that contained skeletons, copper shields, spear points, axes and other artifacts as well as gold relics. Inside the cavern was a metal door that he could not open and what layed beyond is not known. Speculation ranges from a hoard of Aztec treasure to a vast Spanish treasure stockpile of gold and silver. No further reports were forthcoming.
  98. In 1871, the Blue Water Massacre took place at the Blue Water Station on the Yuma-Tucson road between the stations of Picacho and Sacaton. The operators of the station were killed by 3 Mexican outlaws for the money hidden somewhere in or near the station, but it was never found. The accumulated life savings of John W Baker, the operator, also remains secreted somewhere in the vicinity of the old stage stop.
  99. $26,000 in gold was stolen by outlaws during the robbery of an army paymaster, J.W. Whamat, at Cedar Springs in 1889 on the old military road, 16 miles NE of Camp Grant. The money was never recovered and may be buried in the immediate vicinity of the robbery.
  100. Frontiersman and scout William “Arizona Bill” Gardner told of a cache of gold coins cached near or on the grounds of old Camp Grant and hinted that the treasure burial occurred in 1877 and involved 5 cavalrymen on leave from the fort who made off with a $20,000 payroll. 4 of them were killed while out fighting Indians and the fifth deserted the army. It was from the deserter that Gardner learned of the treasure. Arizona Bill died at San Antonio in 1937 at the age of 96.
  101. Paddy Lynch was a prosperous rancher in the 1870’s and 1880’s and a miser who lived near the head of Aravaipa Valley, 10 miles N of Mammoth on the road from Wilcox to Globe. Most of his accumulated hoard of cash was buried somewhere near his house, 20 miles from Fort Grant. He was found shot to death in 1902 and the house ransacked. His cache was never found.
  102. An old Papago silver deposit was shown to John D. Walker in 1880 and a rich mine and boomtown sprang up. Before it was all over. 300 ingots of silver, each weighing 25 pounds, was buried by Walker within 1/2 hours wagon ride from his house at Vekol to the north along the county road to Casa Grande. The hoard was made around 1890,”almost in plain sight” near the old Walker home. The 1050 pounds of pure silver has never been recovered.
  103. A cache of Indian guns, pistols and rifles, numbering upwards of 1,000, is hidden on the Papago Indian Reservation in the mountains to the W of the Santa Rosa Wash between Casa Grande and Santa Rosa in the 1880’s.
  104. In the early 1700’s, the Spaniards mined and accumulated a large store of gold and silver in a cave in the area of the Red Rock Butte NW of Tucson. The treasure was stored in the cave somewhere in the Silver Bell Mountains. Marauding Apache Indians from the north wiped out both the Papagos and Spaniards and the treasure was never recovered. If not on the butte itself, the hoard is located somewhere along the road between Red Rock and Silverbell.
  105. El Tejano was an outlaw in the 1870’s who frequently robbed stagecoaches in Arizona. He was found dead one day along the Santa Cruz River S of Tucson from gunshot wounds sustained in a robbery attempt. His buried caches of stolen loot are believed to remain buried at either Picacho Pass or Cerro del Gato, both near Tucson.
  106. In the late 1890’s, outlaws crossed into Arizona with loot amounting to $48,000 from a Belen, New Mexico, train robbery and hid the cache at the Camp of the Double Circle on Eagle Creek. It was  at this spot that the bandits were shot and killed by lawmen and the treasure never recovered.
  107. In 1905, a gang of outlaws robbed a train at Fort Thomas. An iron-bound chest containing $440,000 and another containing $65,000 was taken. The gang is believed to have buried the treasure, possibly an army payroll intended for Fort Thomas, about 10 feet deep near the holdup scene on private property. This treasure has been connected with the secretive Knights of the Golden Circle, an organization of Confederate and Southern sympathizers who attempted to raise enough money to restart the Civil War.
  108. $14,000, part of a payroll robbery at Cedar Springs in 1889, is buried a few miles SW of Fort Thomas.
  109. Padres transporting church treasure along a trail through the rough Graham Mountains were warned by a scout that Apaches were heading their way. The priests hastily buried a large store of gold coins, jeweled church vessels and other valuables in a cave and in the ensuing battle, all but a few of the party were killed. The survivors escaped and the treasure was never relocated.
  110. There are signs of a caravan of early Spaniards burying a cache of gold bullion on Mount Graham. The party wa traced as far as their stopping place in Shannon Canyon where the gold is believed buried.
  111. Money taken in a stage robbery is believed hidden on the old Camp Grant land on the San Pedro River.
  112. An old Mexican women said that a cache of treasure was buried in the grave of a wealthy Chinese in the abandoned town cemetery at (GT) Metcalf.
  113. A large bean pot buried on Bush Creek, a tributary of Rousensock Canyon, is said to contain a fortune in gold nuggets, buried by a German prospector who was a man named Rose. While on e of the men was away getting supplies, the other was murdered. When the partner returned, he buried their nuggets and left. He never returned for the cache and it is believed that he, too, was killed.
  114. Apache Indians raided a Mexican mine and killed all but a few of the miners. The miners had buried their accumulated gold prior to the attack in many iron bean pots just below the crest of a hill above the creek about 3 miles due W of Ajo. Searchers for decades have failed to locate the buried treasures or the rich gold placer mine.
  115. Papago Indians tell the story that the fabled treasure hoard of Montezuma was buried in a cave near the top of a high peak in the Ajo Mountains, SE of the old mining camp of Gunsight. The legend says that after burying the treasure, Montezuma climbed to the top of the peak and turned to stone. The peak shaped like the head of an Indian is the place to search. Many sources say that there is considerable substance to the Papago legend.
  116. The early Spaniards found gold and silver ore so rich that arrastres and smelters were built to crush the ore and smelt it into ingots. The ingots were stored under the floors of the San Marcelo Mission. In 1750, the Indians rebelled and completely obliterated all signs of the mines, mission and smelter and dumped the bodies of the Spaniards on top of the gold and silver ingots before they covered it over. A large flat rock with an iron ring in the middle covers the entrance to the underground treasure vault. Time, rain and drifting sands have obliterated all traces of this location.
  117. Captain Jesus Arroa buried a large quanity of gold from the wrecked Spanish galleon Isabella Catolica. He moved about 300 miles inland SE of San Diego near the Mexican border and N of the state of Sonara, Mexico. and cached the hoard on the slopes of the Cocopah Range in 1682. Searchers have been made for this cache as far back as 1874 without success.
  118. The treasure of the San Jose del Tucson Mission is said to be buried somewhere on or near the old mission grounds.
  119. There are rumors of treasure  being buried in White House Canyon S of Tucson where the canyon comes out of the flats.
  120. It is said that the old owner of the house located at 1322 Fifth Street in Tucson buried a cache of treasure on his place before he died. It is claimed that his ghost appears at night and sits on the fence guarding his hoard.
  121. In the 1700’s, Spanish Jesuits cached a huge store of gold nuggets in sacks and stacks of gold bars in an old mine tunnel on the E slope of Baboquivari Peak. When they were expelled in 1767, they were forced to leave the treasure behind. In the early 1870’s, a Papago Indian accidently found this Jesuit treasure and removed one sack of nuggets from the location which he frugally lived on for the rest of his life. One day, under extreme pressure from his peers, he said that the site was located in a “Bat Cave” on a ridge extending NE from Baboquivari Peak toward Tucson on the Eside. He said that he closed the entrance to the mine so that flights of bats could never again reveal its location. The site is near Arivaca.
  122. In 1861, “Bandito Juanito,” the Mexican foreman of the Cerro Colorado Mine, highgraded $70,000 in silver bullion and buried it somewhere near the mine. The hot tempered mine owner shot and killed Juan and his stolen silver was never found. Most sources agree that the hoard of bars are still buried on th slope of Cerra Colorado facing the mine on Cerra Chiquito.
  123. DeEstine Sheppard, wealthy Arizona gold miner, cached $5 million worth of gold ore and bullion from his famous diggings near Tucson, accumulated after 30 years of mining, before his death in an Illinois hospital in 1907. The rich mine and huge store of gold is believed located in the vicinity of Arivaca Wash. A map Sheppard drew on his deathbed was extremely vague, but indicated the mine and bullion was located about 55 miles S of Tucson somewhere near the present Nogales-Tucson highway and perhaps the Pajarita Mountains. His route to the mine was along the old Smuggler’s Trail that led past the San Xavier Mission down through the Cerritas and through a pass NE of Cumaro Wash to another pass in the mountains to the S and in the area of Arivaca Wash near the Mexican border.
  124. Pancho Villa’s bandits robbed and looted towns in the Old Mexico and were chased across the line into Arizona where they hid in the mountains 5 or 6 miles from Arivaca. All but one of the gang were killed in a gun battle in 1913. The lone survivor admitted that the loot was cached where he stood as a lookout and could see Sasabe from the S slope. Old Mexico to the W and Main Street of Arivaca to the N. The 2 packloads of treasure were never recovered.
  125. In 1751, word was received at the Tumacacori Mission that the Indians were in revolt. The area mines were covered over and concealed and the gold and silver bars and other church fixtures and ornaments were loaded on a carreta. The hoard of valuables also included a wooden box containing the mission records and a map pinpointing the 8 satelitte mines. While making their way along the trail to the NW, 2 day’s out from the mission and along the trail in the Tascosa Mountain foothills about 6 miles S and 4 miles E of Arivaca, the group ran into Jesuits from the Altar Sonora Mission who were also fleeing the revolt. The Sonora party had with them 8 pack mules of church treasure and ingots. A scout appeared with word that an Apache war party was in the area and the Spanish turned of the road and concealed the entire hoard in an abandoned mine tunnel nearby. The padres  never returned.
  126. The Cienega Stage Station was located near (GT) Pantano. In 1872, it was operated by a small band of outlaws known locally as the “Benders.” Murders, holdups and robberies took place here regularly and with no interference from the law. The Benders, disguised as Apaches, accounted for nearly all of the crimes. Their largest haul was an army payroll of $75,000 stolen in a ambush near their station. This hoard, and a large number of other valuable treasure caches, are  known to have been buried or hidden around the site of the old stage stop and never recovered. A band of real Apaches attacked the station and killed every man.
  127. The Santa Lucia Lost Mine and a store of rich gold ore and bars worth $5 million is located in the Table Mountains.
  128. Around 1909, F.A. Edwards owned 200 acres adjoining the Tumacacori Mission and claimed that his property held a treasure estimated to be worth as much as $80 million-80 mule loads of gold. Records in Madrid and Mexico City supposedly confirm its existence and directions to the cache, but searchers have so far been futile.
  129. Spanish padres built a rock shelter for a large treasure and buried it under tons of rock from a cliff on an ancient trail leading from the old San Xavier del Bac Mission. The search area is 8 miles N of Patagonia and near the old trail.
  130. An old Chinaman named Kang operated a store in the old mining camp of Washington and secreted his gold coins and bars and a small box of jewerly in a secret hole cut into solid rock a few hundred feet from his store. The Chinaman died of a heart attack and the  gold cache was never recovered.
  131. A Southern Pacific express train was robbed of $60,000 in gold coins and bullion by 2 outlaws named Alvord and Stiles in 1899 near Cochise. The gold was buried within 1/2 mile of an old cabin a few miles outside Cochise to the north and along the old trail between Wilcox and Cochise, probably within a few miles of Cochise. The money was buried with an agreement that it would  be recovered once the heat died down, but the gang was arrested or killed and the cache never recovered. Wells Fargo agents made a long search for the loot, but they were unsuccessful.
  132. In 1895, bandits robbed the safe in the express car  of the Southern Pacific RR, 5 miles W of Wilcox. In an effort to dynamite the safe, 8 sacks of Mexican silver dollars were used to weight the sticks down on the top of the safe. The explosion blew 8,000 silver coins through the roof of the RR car and spread them all over the right-of-way. It is said that RR agents recovered about 7,000 coins after the incident leaving some 1,000 behind. There have been reports by treasure hunters that these coins are still being recovered here.
  133. A cache of gold dust and silver coins was secreted by Apache Indians after they attacked a wagon train a few miles NE of the stage station at Mountain Springs. The dutch oven containing the treasure is hidden behind two rocks at the point of the Winchester Mountains NE of Wilcox.
  134. A Mexican wagon train, loaded with a large amount of treasure including a life-sized gold statue of the Virgin, a huge store of gold dust and nuggets and a large gold cross, was bound for Sante Fe and camped in the dry bed of a creek between 2 hills at the springs at Dos Cabezas. The huge store of treasure was buried before the men retired for the night. Apache Indians attacked and killed the party and only one small boy escaped and returned to Mexico. 45 years later he returned in search of the treasure, but he was never able to locate te exact burial site.
  135. The outlaw Zwing Hunt, who took in part in the Skeleton Canyon fracas, is said to have buried part of the treasure in gold and diamonds in a canyon on Harris Mountain. He also added to this cache with loot from other robberies and holdups. A dying outlaw is to have revealed that the value of this treasure hoard was $300,000.
  136. After a bank robbery in Nogales in 1884, the notorious Black Jack Ketcham hid the loot in “Room Forty Four,” a cave located in Wild Cat Canyon at the S end of the Chiricahua Mountains and about 8 miles SW of Portal. The cave is located near the old William Lutley Ranch.
  137. Outlaw “Pop” Clanton of the Clanton gang buried $50,000 in gold coins on or near  the site of the old Clanton Ranch of Horsethief Springs near Tombstone. The coins were stolen from a baggage car during  train robbery. He died in the 1930’s at the age of 90, refusing to tell his Ruffian sons where the treasure was located. It has never been found.
  138. In 1882, the Apache chief Cochise raided emigrant trains, ranches and robbed stagecoaches. Although he had no use for gold, he took every opportunity to take it from the whites. On one occasion he seized 2 heavy iron-bound chests filled with gold coins from the Butterfield stage and somehow managed to drag or haul the chests to his Apache hideout, later known as Cochise Stronghold Canyon in the Dragoon Mountains, about 10 miles SE of Dragoon. Even after peace was made, the Apaches vowed that no white man would ever find the hidden chests, located in a place where even a horse cannot travel. They’re still there.
  139. A post hole bank containing $16,000 is believed buried on the old Jones ranch near Naco, on the Arizona side, about 1/4 mile S of the old ranch house.
Categories: Ancient Treasure, Arizona, artifacts, gold, gold coins, gold crosses, gold ingots, gold jewelry, Gold Mine, hidden, Legends, Lost gold, Lost Mines, Lost Treasure, silver, silver coins, Spanish gold, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Some GHOST TOWNS OF ILLINOIS


 

bodie

JO DAVIESS COUNTY

1…Council Hill…near the State line on railroad, 7 miles Northeast of Galena
2…Scales Mound…near State line on railroad, 13 miles West of Warren
3…Law…near State line on railroad, 10 miles West of Warren
4…Apple River…on the State line and railroad, 5 miles West of Warren
5…Winston…on railroad, 5 miles East Southeast of Galena
6…Schapville…4 1/2 miles Northwest of Woodbine
7…Blanding…on railroad and Mississippi River, 5 miles West Northwest of Hanover.
8…Old Hanover…in the far Southwest corner ofthe county on railroad and Mississippi River, 4 1/2 miles South Southwest of present Hanover.
9…Derinda Center…5 miles Southeast of Elizabeth
10…Pleasant Valley…on the South County line and the Plum River, 5 miles South Southwest of Willow.
STEVENSON COUNTY

1…Afolkey…4 miles Northwest of Dakota
2…Damascus…4 miles West of Cedarville
3…Winneshiek…5 miles Northeast of Freeport
4…Dunbar…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles South of Freeport
5…Stevens…2 miles North of German Valley
WINNEBAGO COUNTY
1…Letham Park…on the railroad, 5 miles South of Rockton
2…Genet..on the railroad, 3 miles West of Loves Park
3…Alworth…on the railroad, 5 miles East of Seward
4…Elida…on the South County line, 4 miles South of Winnebago
BOONE COUNTY
1…Amesville…near Garden Paririe…old stage coach stop on the Old Galena/Chicago Road.
MC HENRY COUNTY
1…Lawrence…on the railroad, 3 miles Northwest of Harvard
2…Armsby…on the railroad and State line, 3 miles West of Richmond
3…Sonon Mills…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles Southeast of Richmond
4…Johnburg…2 1/2 miles Northeast of McHenry
5…Terra Cotta…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles South of McHenry
6…North Crystal lake…on the railroad, 2 miles Northeast of Crystal Lake
7…Coral…2 miles Southeast of Marengo
8…Coyne…on the railroad and South county line, 1 1/2 miles West of Huntley.
LAKE COUNTY
1…Hickory…3 miles West of Rosecrans
2…Gilmer…on the railroad, 4 miles Southwest of Mundelein
CARROLL COUNTY
1…Marcus…on the railroad by North County line, 6 miles Northwest of Savanna.
2…Barth…on the North County line, 8 miles North Northwest of Mt. Carroll
3…Palsgrove…on the North County line, 6 miles North of Mt. Carroll
4…Keltner…on the North County line, 7 1/2 miles Northwest of Lanark
5…Hickory Grove…on the railroad, 5 miles East of Savanna
6…Timbuctoo…on the railroad, 5 miles South Southeast of Savanna
7…Big Cut…on the railroad, 3 1/2 miles Southwest of Mt. Carroll
8…Ashdale…on the railroad, 3 miles West of Lanark
9…Nursery…5 miles East of Lanark

Categories: artifacts, Ghost Towns, Haunting, hidden, Metal Detecting, silver, silver coins, treasure, Treasure Hunting, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Maya ‘snake dynasty’ tomb uncovered holding body, treasure and hieroglyphs…


Xunantunich, in western Belize, where archaeologists found a tomb and hieroglyphic panels depicting the history of the ‘snake dynasty’.
Xunantunich, in western Belize, where archaeologists found a tomb and hieroglyphic panels depicting the history of the ‘snake dynasty’. Photograph: Jaime Awe

Archaeologists have uncovered what may be the largest royal tomb found in more than a century of work on Maya ruins in Belize, along with a puzzling set of hieroglyphic panels that provide clues to a “snake dynasty” that conquered many of its neighbors some 1,300 years ago.

The tomb was unearthed at the ruins of Xunantunich, a city on the Mopan river in western Belize that served as a ceremonial center in the final centuries of Maya dominance around 600 to 800 AD. Archaeologists found the chamber 16ft to 26ft below ground, where it had been hidden under more than a millennium of dirt and debris.

Researchers found the tomb as they excavated a central stairway of a large structure: within were the remains of a male adult, somewhere between 20 and 30 years old, lying supine with his head to the south.

The archaeologist Jaime Awe said preliminary analysis by osteologists found the man was athletic and “quite muscular” at his death, and that more analysis should provide clues about his identity, health and cause of death.

In the grave, archaeologists also found jaguar and deer bones, six jade beads, possibly from a necklace, 13 obsidian blades and 36 ceramic vessels. At the base of the stairway, they found two offering caches that had nine obsidian and 28 chert flints and eccentrics – chipped artefacts that resemble flints but are carved into the shapes of animals, leaves or other symbols.

The excavation site at Xunantunich.
The excavation site at Xunantunich. Photograph: Jaime Awe

“It certainly has been a great field season for us,” said Awe, who led a team from his own school, Northern Arizona University, and the Belize Institute ofArchaeology.

The tomb represents an extraordinary find, if only for its construction. At 4.5 meters by 2.4 meters, it is “one of the largest burial chambers ever discovered in Belize”, Awe said. It appears to differ dramatically from other grave sites of the era. Most Maya tombs were built “intrusively”, as additions to existing structures, but the new tomb was built simultaneously with the structure around it – a common practice among cultures such as the ancient Egyptians, but uncommon among the Mayas.

“In other words, it appears that the temple was purposely erected for the primary purpose of enclosing the tomb,” Awe said. “Except for a very few rare cases, this is not very typical in ancient Maya architecture.”

Many Maya societies ruled through dynastic families. Tombs for male and femalerulers have been found, including those of the so-called “snake dynasty”, named for the snake-head emblem associated with its house. The family had a string of conquests in the seventh century, and ruled from two capital cities. Awe said the newly discovered hieroglyphic panels could prove “even more important than the tomb”, by providing clues to the dynasty’s history.

The third hieroglyphic panel discovered at the Mayan ruins in Xunantunich, in western Belize, with Awe holding a flashlight.
The third hieroglyphic panel discovered at the Maya ruins in Xunantunich, with Jaime Awe holding a flashlight. Photograph: Christophe Helmke

The panels are believed to be part of a staircase originally built 26 miles to the south, at the ancient city of Caracol. Epigraphers say the city’s ruler, Lord Kan II of the snake dynasty, recorded his defeat of another city, Naranjo, on the hieroglyph, to go with his many other self-commemorations. On another work, he recorded a ball game involving a captured Naranjo leader whom he eventually sacrificed.

Naranjo apparently had its revenge some years later, in 680AD, having the panels dismantled and partially reassembled at home with gaps and incorrect syntax – possibly deliberately, to obscure the story of the snake dynasties’ conquests. Fragments have been discovered elsewhere in Caracol and at a fourth site along the Mopan river, but Awe said the new panels could be “bookends” to the story of war and sacrifice in the ancient Maya world.

According to the University of Copenhagen’s Christophe Helmke, the research team’s epigrapher, the panels provide a clue for Kan II’s conquests – he appears to have dedicated or commissioned the work in 642AD – and they note the death of Kan’s mother, Lady Batz’ Ek’. The panels also identify a previously unknown ruler from the Mexican site of Calakmul, Awe said.

Helmke said the panels “tell us of the existence of a king of the dynasty that was murky figure at best, who is clearly named as Waxaklajuun Ubaah Kan” . This ruler reigned sometime between 630 and 640AD, and may have been Kan’s half-brother.

“This means that there were two contenders to the throne, both carrying the same dynastic title, which appears to have been read Kanu’l Ajaw, ‘king of the place where snakes abound’,” he wrote in an email.

The panels clarify what Helmke called a “tumultuous phase of the snake-head dynasty” and explain how it splintered between cities before dominating Maya politics in the region.

The panels identify the origin of the snake dynasty at Dzibanche, in the Yucatan peninsula of modern Mexico, and refer to the family’s move to their capital of Calakmul. Awe said Lady Batz’ Ek’ “was likely a native of Yakha, a site in neighboring Guatemala, who later married the ruler of Caracol as part of a marriage alliance”.

The nine eccentrics.
The nine eccentrics. Photograph: Kelsey Sullivan, courtesy Jaime Awe

The researchers have had their work peer-reviewed for publication in the Journal of the Pre-columbian Art Research Institute.

Awe said it was not clear why the panels appeared in Xunantunich, but the city may have allied itself with or been a vassal state to Naranjo. The cities both fell into decline, along with other Maya societies, around 800 to 1,000AD, for reasons still mysterious but possibly including climate change, disease and war.

The city was called Xunantunich, meaning “stone woman” in the Yucatec Maya, long after its abandonment by original residents. The name derives from folklore around the city about a hunter who saw a ghostly, statuesque woman, dressed in indigenous garb, standing near an entrance to a temple called El Castillo – a storytouted by tourist sites today. The site was also once called Mount Maloney, after a British governor.

The temple is impressive in its own right, a stone structure that towers 130ft above the city’s main plaza, adorned with a stucco frieze that represents the gods of the sun and moon

Categories: Ancient Treasure, Archaeology, artifacts, emeralds, Emperor, gold, gold chains, gold coins, hidden, jewels, Legends, Lost Treasure, silver, Strange News, treasure, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

THE MYSTERIOUS “GATE OF THE GODS” AT HAYU MARCA, PERU….


The mysterious “Gate of the Gods” at Hayu Marca, Peru

An ancient legend speaks of a mysterious door which is located in the vicinity of Lake Titicaca. This door, will open one day and welcome the creator gods of all mankind. These gods will return in their “Solar Ships” and all mankind will be in awe.

Strangely such a door seems to exist according researchers. Located near the mountainous region of Hayu Brand, 35 Km of the city of Puno in Peru, we find the mysterious “Gate of the Gods”. Since immemorial time, this region has been revered by local natives who actually consider it as the “city of the gods” Even though a few structures have been discovered, researchers believe that there are numerous monuments hidden beneath the surface.

20081129_0004

 

This “Gate” was discovered by accident when local tour guide Jose Luis Delgado Mamani was hiking in the surrounding area. Curiously Mamani stated that he had long before dreamed about this structure and saw what appeared to be a door covered with pink marble with several figures located to the sides. These visions are closely linked to the legends of the native Indians of the area that tell that this “door” was a “gateway to the land of the Gods”. Legends speak that in the distant past, great heroes crossed into the land of the gods, enjoying a prosperous and glorious immortal life.

Another legend says that during the time of the Spanish conquest, an Incan priest called Amaru Muru, from the temple of the seven rays fled from his temple with a sacred golden disk known as “the key to the gods of the seven rays“. The priest hid in the mountains of Hayu Brand afraid that the Spanish might take the key from him.

Later the priest arrived at the “Gate of the Gods” at Hayu Marca, where he showed the key to several priests and shamans of the area. After they performed a ritual, the door opened with a blue light emanating from it. The priest, Amaru Muru handed the golden disk to one of the shamans and entered the door, he was never seen again.

aramumuru

Mysteriously, researchers have found a circular depression to the side of the door where a smaller disk-shaped object could have been placed.

Visitors who have traveled to the “Gate of the Gods” at Hayu Marca, and who have placed their hands on the small door state that they feel a great energy that flows through their bodies, they have also described strange visions like stars, columns of fire and music which some described as being “rhythmic, unusual and extraordinary”.

 The “Gate of the Gods” at Hayu Marca resembles the Puerta del Sol de Tiwanaku (Tiahuanaco) and five other archaeological sites in the vicinity. Mysteriously if we draw straight lines between the Gate of the Gods” at Hayu Marca, the Puerta del Sol de Tiwanaku and other archaeological sites, we get a strange cross that joins at the center at the plateau of Lake Titicaca, one of the most sacred places in the region.

1280px-Zonnepoort_tiwanaku-768x512

Researchers have even found the remains of an ancient city beneath Lake Titicaca, presumed to have existed thousands of years ago, predating the known cultures of the region.

Is it possible that there are “portals” located on Earth which are connected to other galaxies? planets? dimensions? And that one of those portals is the “Gate of the Gods” at Hayu Marca? Is it possible that these ancient texts are more than just stories of the past? And that there is something true and unique about them? We look forward to finding out more about these mysterious locations and there hidden secrets.

ABOUT AUTHOR:
Ivan is a freelance writer, editor-in-chief of ancient-code.com, he also writes for EWAO, Share Knowledge, Svemir Online and Ancient Origins.History, Archaeology, Space and world’s mysteries are some of the topics he writes about.

Source:Ancient-code.com

Categories: aliens, Aliens and UFO's, hidden, Legends, revealing information, Strange News, treasure, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

TWO GIANT UNDERWATER CRYSTAL PYRAMIDS DISCOVERED IN THE CENTER OF THE BERMUDA TRIANGLE….


Two Giant Underwater Crystal Pyramids Discovered in the Center of the Bermuda Triangle

TWO GIANT UNDERWATER CRYSTAL PYRAMIDS DISCOVERED IN THE CENTER OF THE BERMUDA TRIANGLE

With the use of sonar, oceanographer Dr. Meyer Verlag discovered giant glass pyramids at a depth of two-thousand meters. The use of other devices have allowed scientists to determine that these glass giants are both made of a crystal-like substance, and are nearly 3 times bigger than the pyramid of Cheops in Egypt

Dr. Verlag believes that further investigation into the secrets in the the pyramids center could reveal more information regarding the cases of mysterious disappearances associated with the Bermuda Triangle.  In a press conference held in the Bahamas, the scientist presented a report with the exact coordinates of the pyramids, and made note that the technology at use is unknown to modern science.  A more detailed study may bring results that are difficult for us to imagine.  Who knows what will be discovered about these underwater architectural anomalies – perhaps something of shocking significance.

Built on Land – Lost During Last Pole Shift?

There are several Western scholars who argue that the pyramid on the seabed may have been initially made on the mainland, after which a devastating earthquake struck and changed the landscape completely. Other scientists argue that a few hundred years ago the waters of the Bermuda Triangle area may have as one of the cornerstone activities of the people of Atlantis, and Pyramids on the sea floor may be a supply warehouse for them.

A more detailed study over time will give results that are difficult to imagine. Scientists have processed all of the data and concluded that the surface is perfectly smooth for it to look like glass or ice. The size of the pyramids are nearly three times the size of the pyramids of Cheops. This news was sensational, and was discussed at a conference in Florida and even reported to local Florida newspapers.. The journalists present in it, have a lot of pictures and high resolution computerized data, which show three-dimensional pyramids perfectly smooth, without being covered with a surface free of debris or algae or cracks.

Discovery Challenges Current Archaelogical Theory

A gigantic structure, initially identified by a doctor in the 1960s, has recently been independently verified by diving teams from France and the U.S.

The discovery has rocked scientists around the world. Will they rush to investigate it? No, they’re more likely to studiously ignore it. If pressed, they’ll officially position themselves as highly skeptical—especially in light of the potential ramifications.

The pyramid could confirm some engineers’ contentions that pyramids were originally created as massive power sources, support the claim that the ancient city-state of Atlantis did exist, or even provide answers to the mysterious goings-on that have been recorded since the 19th Century in the region of the Atlantic dubbed the Bermuda Triangle.

First discovered in 1968

According to the history, the pyramid was accidentally discovered during 1968 by a doctor of naturopathy, Ray Brown of Mesa, Arizona.

Brown was in the Caribbean on vacation and making dives with friends in a region off the Bahamas known as “the Tongue of the Ocean.” The area acquired that name because a tongue-shaped portion of the seabed extends out from the island before sharply dropping off into much greater depths.

When relating his discovery, the doctor explained he became separated from his diving friends underwater. While attempting to rejoin them he came upon a massive structure rising from the ocean floor: a black, hulking object silhouetted against the lighter sun-filtered water. The object was shaped like a pyramid.

Because he was low on air, he didn’t spend much time investigating the pyramid, but did find a strange crystal sphere.

He brought it to the surface with him and later when the ancient crystal was studied researchers were astonished by its properties.

Properties of Crystal Pyramids

Some theories of Atlantis propose the island city’s power pyramids were made of crystal, or their tops were capped with a crystalline substance.

Could such a thing actually generate, store, and distribute energy on demand?  Yes.

Experimenters discovered decades ago that pyramids do tend to act in some ways like a natural electrical capacitor gathering and storing energy around them. The larger the pyramid, the greater the capacity of gathering and storing energy. A pyramid’s composition is important too. Having one made of crystal, or an apex made of crystal, could vastly increase its power.

Crystal has long been known to have energy applications and exhibits natural piezoelectrical properties.

Early radio used germanium crystals to capture the radiowaves and convert them into electrical signals that could be processed and broadcast through headphones into soundwaves duplicating the human voice, music, and other sounds.

Pyramid power, say investigators, is intrinsic to the pyramid shape. It’s an architecture that’s proven to function as an energy accumulator and amplifier of energetic force.

As if to prove the investigators’ assertions true, recently some of the worlds pyramids began discharging beams of raw energy into space.

The bottom line? Pyramids are intrinsically natural generators of power.

Pyramids and the ‘Cavity Structural Effect’

Barry Carter calls attention to another property that pyramids exhibit called the “Cavity Structural Effect” (CSE) by its discoverer, Dr. Viktor S. Grebennikov. The scientist employed the CSE to construct a rudimentary anti-gravitic platform.

Carter explains that “Grebennikov also claimed that he could feel energies emitting from the apex of a pyramid: ‘You will soon pick up an active zone, a “clot”, where the Egyptians had their tombs. Another active zone (a “flame”) above the top of the pyramid is also well-perceived by the indicator if you drag its end over the top. The “clot” and the “flame” are well-felt by the finger inserted into the pyramid, or your palm moved above it after some practice. The pyramid effect, which generated many scary and mysterious stories over the centuries, is one of the CSE manifestations.’”

Another deadly phenomenon pyramids may create: an energy vortex

Besides the time and spatial anomalies reported in the Triangle, some survivors of terrifing incidents there have reported huge, swirling vortices suddenly appearing and disappearing .

Evidence exists that some missing ships may have gone missing because of this phenomenon.

Observations of some of the submerged pyramids reveals they sporadically generate intense vortices in the ocean water flowing around them. Those vortices may be caused by a discharge of internal energy.

If those submerged pyramids also discharge massive enegy through their apexes, that could account for the formation of deadly vortices on the surface of the sea that swallows up whole ships along with their doomed crews.

Future expeditions to these mysterious pyramids may finally uncover the truth and reveal amazing ancient technology.

Unfortunately, deep sea archaeology is very expensive and not well-funded. Most dives are to ancient wrecks that promise riches to risk-taking treasure hunters.

And, of course, the world’s universities are not especially eager to explore the idea that very ancient ruins containing high technology may exist that challenges virtually all of the foundations of their pet theories.

By: Lilya la Felore

Categories: aliens, Aliens and UFO's, Ancient Treasure, Archaeology, artifacts, Egypt, hidden, Legends, Lost Treasure, Strange News, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.

mayanexplore.com

Riviera Maya Travel Guide

Cajun Food, Louisiana History, and a Little Lagniappe

Preservation of traditional River Road cuisine, Louisiana history & architecture, and the communities between Baton Rouge & NOLA

Jali Wanders

Wondering and Wandering

Southpaw Tracks

“If ever a time should come, when vain and aspiring men shall possess the highest seats in Government, our country will stand in need of its experienced patriots to prevent its ruin.” ~Samuel Adams

Pacific Paratrooper

This WordPress.com site is Pacific War era information

what's the formula?

Nurturing awesomeness: from the parents of celebrities, heroes, trailblazers and leaders

Tarheel Red

A Voice of Conservatism Living in Carolina Blue

cancer killing recipe

Just another WordPress.com site

dreamshadow59

A great WordPress.com site

Mike's Look at Life

Photography, memoirs, random thoughts.

Belle Grove Plantation Bed and Breakfast

Birthplace of James Madison and Southern Plantation

Letters for Michael

Lessons on being gay, of love, life and lots of it

Sunny Sleevez

Sun Protection & Green Info

Backcountry Tranquility

A journal about my travels and related experiences :)

LEANNE COLE

Art and Practice

Lukas Chodorowicz

Travel, culture and lifestyle experienced on my adventures around the world. All photos taken by me. Instagram: @colorspark

BunnyandPorkBelly

life is always sweeter and yummier through a lens. bunnyandporkbelly [at] gmail [dot] com

%d bloggers like this: