gold chains

OHIO, GHOST TOWNS, HENRY, OTTAWA AND DEFIANCE COUNTIES


DEFIANCE COUNTY OHIO
GHOST TOWNS
1. Glenburg…on county line, 4 miles West of Evansport
2. Cicero…3 miles North of Rosedale
3. Patton…2 miles Northwest of Hicksville on State line
4. Moates…2 1/2 miles South of Ney
5. The Bend…2 1/2 miles East of Sherwood
6. Ashwood…on the county line, 5 miles Southeast of Sherwood
7. Independence…on the Maumee River and Erie Canal, 5 miles West Southwest of Florida.
OTTAWA COUNTY
GHOST TOWNS
1. Frenchtown…6 1/2 miles Northeast of Limestone
2. Nina…2 1/2 miles Northwest of Camp Perry
3. Peachton…1 miles South of Catawba Island
4. Picolo…2 miles Southwest of Lakeside
HENRY COUNTY
GHOST TOWNS
1. Tubbsville..on the county line, 5 miles Southeast of Archbold
2. Naomi…near the county line, 2 miles North of Gerald
3. Colton…on the railroad, 3 miles Northeast of Liberty Center
4. Gallup…2 1/2 miles South of Hamler
5. Unnamed…an unnamed ghost town was on the road North of teh Maumee River, 1 mile South of Okolona, founded in 1836, it had a tavern and trading post.

 

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Categories: artifacts, Ghost Towns, gold, gold chains, gold coins, Haunting, Legends, Lost gold, silver, silver coins, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Custom Gold Jewelry…by Steve Wandt


steve

Looking for Custom Gold Jewelry by one of the finest Goldsmiths in the United States?

Specializing In Heavy Mens Gold Rings… 

Here are some pics of a ring he has made for me..from  the wax mold to finished product.

ring3

mr2

new ring

NATURAL GOLD JEWELRY

STEVE  WANDT

EL DORADO

IN SPANISH MEANS THE GOLDEN  ONE AND IS THE NAME OF A MUISCA TRIBAL CHIEF WHO COVERED HIMSELF WITH GOLD DUST AND, AS AN INITIATION RITE, DOVE INTO LAKE GUAVATITA.  I AM KNOWN AS EL DORADO IN THE ARTISAN MINING COMMUNITY AND HAVE BEEN A PROSPECTOR FOR 30 YEARS. PRETTY MUCH DONE IT ALL BUT NOWADAYS I MOSTLY DETECT FOR GOLD AND PURSUE MY PASSION OF MAKING UNIQUE JEWELRY FROM NATURAL GOLD.  ESPECIALLY FROM GOLD FOUND IN THE CALIFORNIA MOTHERLODEALL THE YEARS I WAS MINING FOR GOLD I ALWAYS WANTED TO BE ABLE TO USE MY FOUND GOLD IN JEWELRY.  IN 1994 I ATTENDED THE CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF JEWELRY TRAINING, JEWELRY ARTS PROGRAM AND LEARNED GOLDSMITHING.  I LOVE TO TURN GOLD DUST AND NUGGETS INTO ONE OF A KIND CREATIONS IN MY PRIVATE STUDIO. WHEN I’M NOT OUT PROSPECTING I AM USUALLY SLABBING, CABBING, SMELTING AND CASTING GOLD.  AT TIMES I AM COVERED IN GOLD DUST LIKE EL DORADO.

MY SMALL ARTISAN COMPANY IS KNOWN AS NATURAL GOLD JEWELRY. THIS SITE IS A GALLERY OF A FEW OF MY PAST CREATIONS. THERE IS NOTHING TO SELL, BUT JUST SHARE MY WORK WITH THOSE THAT ARE INTERESTED.  I DO NOT MAKE JEWELRY AHEAD OF TIME. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN HAVING ME MAKE A PIECE FOR YOU, MY CONTACT INFO IS AVAILABLE ON THIS SITE.

Here is the link to Steve’s website, many pics of the type of jewelry he has made.

http://www.naturalgoldjewelry.com/home.html

Don’t see something you want, just contact Steve and he will work to insure your custom design is made just for you.  Old World Craftsmanship is just an email away.  Check him out today, use your gold or his.

Categories: gold, gold chains, gold coins, gold crosses, gold jewelry, Spanish gold, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Maya ‘snake dynasty’ tomb uncovered holding body, treasure and hieroglyphs…


Xunantunich, in western Belize, where archaeologists found a tomb and hieroglyphic panels depicting the history of the ‘snake dynasty’.
Xunantunich, in western Belize, where archaeologists found a tomb and hieroglyphic panels depicting the history of the ‘snake dynasty’. Photograph: Jaime Awe

Archaeologists have uncovered what may be the largest royal tomb found in more than a century of work on Maya ruins in Belize, along with a puzzling set of hieroglyphic panels that provide clues to a “snake dynasty” that conquered many of its neighbors some 1,300 years ago.

The tomb was unearthed at the ruins of Xunantunich, a city on the Mopan river in western Belize that served as a ceremonial center in the final centuries of Maya dominance around 600 to 800 AD. Archaeologists found the chamber 16ft to 26ft below ground, where it had been hidden under more than a millennium of dirt and debris.

Researchers found the tomb as they excavated a central stairway of a large structure: within were the remains of a male adult, somewhere between 20 and 30 years old, lying supine with his head to the south.

The archaeologist Jaime Awe said preliminary analysis by osteologists found the man was athletic and “quite muscular” at his death, and that more analysis should provide clues about his identity, health and cause of death.

In the grave, archaeologists also found jaguar and deer bones, six jade beads, possibly from a necklace, 13 obsidian blades and 36 ceramic vessels. At the base of the stairway, they found two offering caches that had nine obsidian and 28 chert flints and eccentrics – chipped artefacts that resemble flints but are carved into the shapes of animals, leaves or other symbols.

The excavation site at Xunantunich.
The excavation site at Xunantunich. Photograph: Jaime Awe

“It certainly has been a great field season for us,” said Awe, who led a team from his own school, Northern Arizona University, and the Belize Institute ofArchaeology.

The tomb represents an extraordinary find, if only for its construction. At 4.5 meters by 2.4 meters, it is “one of the largest burial chambers ever discovered in Belize”, Awe said. It appears to differ dramatically from other grave sites of the era. Most Maya tombs were built “intrusively”, as additions to existing structures, but the new tomb was built simultaneously with the structure around it – a common practice among cultures such as the ancient Egyptians, but uncommon among the Mayas.

“In other words, it appears that the temple was purposely erected for the primary purpose of enclosing the tomb,” Awe said. “Except for a very few rare cases, this is not very typical in ancient Maya architecture.”

Many Maya societies ruled through dynastic families. Tombs for male and femalerulers have been found, including those of the so-called “snake dynasty”, named for the snake-head emblem associated with its house. The family had a string of conquests in the seventh century, and ruled from two capital cities. Awe said the newly discovered hieroglyphic panels could prove “even more important than the tomb”, by providing clues to the dynasty’s history.

The third hieroglyphic panel discovered at the Mayan ruins in Xunantunich, in western Belize, with Awe holding a flashlight.
The third hieroglyphic panel discovered at the Maya ruins in Xunantunich, with Jaime Awe holding a flashlight. Photograph: Christophe Helmke

The panels are believed to be part of a staircase originally built 26 miles to the south, at the ancient city of Caracol. Epigraphers say the city’s ruler, Lord Kan II of the snake dynasty, recorded his defeat of another city, Naranjo, on the hieroglyph, to go with his many other self-commemorations. On another work, he recorded a ball game involving a captured Naranjo leader whom he eventually sacrificed.

Naranjo apparently had its revenge some years later, in 680AD, having the panels dismantled and partially reassembled at home with gaps and incorrect syntax – possibly deliberately, to obscure the story of the snake dynasties’ conquests. Fragments have been discovered elsewhere in Caracol and at a fourth site along the Mopan river, but Awe said the new panels could be “bookends” to the story of war and sacrifice in the ancient Maya world.

According to the University of Copenhagen’s Christophe Helmke, the research team’s epigrapher, the panels provide a clue for Kan II’s conquests – he appears to have dedicated or commissioned the work in 642AD – and they note the death of Kan’s mother, Lady Batz’ Ek’. The panels also identify a previously unknown ruler from the Mexican site of Calakmul, Awe said.

Helmke said the panels “tell us of the existence of a king of the dynasty that was murky figure at best, who is clearly named as Waxaklajuun Ubaah Kan” . This ruler reigned sometime between 630 and 640AD, and may have been Kan’s half-brother.

“This means that there were two contenders to the throne, both carrying the same dynastic title, which appears to have been read Kanu’l Ajaw, ‘king of the place where snakes abound’,” he wrote in an email.

The panels clarify what Helmke called a “tumultuous phase of the snake-head dynasty” and explain how it splintered between cities before dominating Maya politics in the region.

The panels identify the origin of the snake dynasty at Dzibanche, in the Yucatan peninsula of modern Mexico, and refer to the family’s move to their capital of Calakmul. Awe said Lady Batz’ Ek’ “was likely a native of Yakha, a site in neighboring Guatemala, who later married the ruler of Caracol as part of a marriage alliance”.

The nine eccentrics.
The nine eccentrics. Photograph: Kelsey Sullivan, courtesy Jaime Awe

The researchers have had their work peer-reviewed for publication in the Journal of the Pre-columbian Art Research Institute.

Awe said it was not clear why the panels appeared in Xunantunich, but the city may have allied itself with or been a vassal state to Naranjo. The cities both fell into decline, along with other Maya societies, around 800 to 1,000AD, for reasons still mysterious but possibly including climate change, disease and war.

The city was called Xunantunich, meaning “stone woman” in the Yucatec Maya, long after its abandonment by original residents. The name derives from folklore around the city about a hunter who saw a ghostly, statuesque woman, dressed in indigenous garb, standing near an entrance to a temple called El Castillo – a storytouted by tourist sites today. The site was also once called Mount Maloney, after a British governor.

The temple is impressive in its own right, a stone structure that towers 130ft above the city’s main plaza, adorned with a stucco frieze that represents the gods of the sun and moon

Categories: Ancient Treasure, Archaeology, artifacts, emeralds, Emperor, gold, gold chains, gold coins, hidden, jewels, Legends, Lost Treasure, silver, Strange News, treasure, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Capt Carl Fismer..Book signing event..21 Feb 2016


carltitle

 

Tomorrow from 3 to 6, (Sunday 21 Feb 2016) Sam Milner and I will be signing our Book, Uncharted Waters,40 years of Treasure Hunting, at the Lor-i-lei Restaurant in Islamorada, MM 82, Florida Keys.

Uncharted Waters can be found at http://www.treasureexpeditions.com (PayPal accepted) or a check for 24.95 plus 4 dollars for shipping to, Spanish Main Treasure Co. P.O. Box 1733, Tavernier Fl. 33070. Outside United States add 17.00 for shipping.

http://www.treasureexpeditions.com/uncharted_waters_carl_fismer.htm

WHO IS CAPT CARL FISMER?

Carl Fismer is a world famous Treasure Diver, Cancer Survivor, World Traveler, Television Star and Dynamic Motivational Keynote Speaker.

With over 30 years of treasure search and salvage experience, Captain Carl Fismer is one of the most respected and knowledgeable diving professionals in the world.  Carl has worked with some of the leaders in treasure hunting. Carl has worked over 30 years with respected Treasure Historian Jack Haskins and worked with Mel Fisher on the Atocha.  His area of expertise is shipwrecks… especially Spanish shipwrecks. During his career, he has worked over 300 shipwrecks in the United States, Bahamas, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, the Indian Ocean and Central and South America. He has recovered millions of dollars in Spanish gold, silver, jewels and other artifacts. “Fizz”, as he is known to friends, directed part of the salvage diving of the Santa Margarita, sister ship to the Nuestra Senora de Atocha which was discovered by Mel Fisher. Then in 1986, he led an expedition to the Silver Shoals in the Dominican Republic, and there located the famed galleon, Concepcion which sank during a hurricane in 1641. In 1992, he traveled to Sri Lanka and dived with Sir Arthur C. Clarke of 2001: A Space Odyssey fame, in association with the Great Basses Reef Treasures. In May, 2010, Captain Fismer was awarded the Mel Fisher Lifetime Achievement Award for perseverance in following his quest for life, his motivation of mankind in the search for knowledge, discovery and the ambitions of the human spirit and the ability to achieve in life what others might only dare to dream.

SPANISH MAIN TREASURE COMPANY (SMTC) was founded by Captain Carl E. Fismer in 1980. Since its inception, SMTC has salvaged artifacts and sunken treasure from shipwrecks around the world. SMTC maintains a considerable inventory of treasure, coins, artifacts, books and video documentaries for perusal or sale to museums, collectors and history enthusiasts. SMTC specializes in producing treasure-related speeches, treasure-related exhibitions and displays for conventions, theme and entertainment parks, shopping malls, cruise ships and any special occasion. These presentations have proven to increase attendance and interest wherever we go.

 

Carl Fismer lives the life of an adventurer. The type of life that they make books, movies and video games about.  Carl Fismer, affectionately dubbed “Fizz”, is a treasure hunter that has dived on some of the world’s most famous shipwrecks.  He is often described as a real life underwater Indiana Jones.  Carl is an active treasure hunter who travels the world looking for treasure and artifacts.  He has worked with Mel Fisher on the world famous treasure ship, the Atocha.  Carl Fismer is often called in as an expert on shipwrecks and treasures of the Spanish Main when producers and writers want to add realism to their productions.

When Carl Fismer isn’t diving shipwrecks, he tours around the world as a motivational speaker.  Imagine your next conference with an inspirational speaker as electrifying as Carl Fismer as your keynote speaker.  The excitement of the crowd when they hear that a world famous treasure diver is is going to be featured.  Carl’s story is fascinating and will motivate and inspire the room.  Carl Fismer delights his audience with stories of shipwrecks, lost treasure, the Spanish Main, and treasure hunting. Carl is a motivational speaker like no other.  Unlike usual speakers who are business people or politicians, your audience will be intrigued and inspired by Carl’s unique story.

Carl Fismer is a motivational speaker who left an ordinary job to lead the life of a treasure hunter.  Carl has weathered hurricanes, starred in his own television series “Treasure Divers”,  looked for lost treasure and  found millions of dollars of sunken treasure.

Categories: Ancient Treasure, Archaeology, artifacts, emeralds, gold, gold chains, gold coins, gold crosses, gold ingots, Lost Treasure, Mel Fisher, silver, silver coins, Spanish gold, treasure, treasure diver, Treasure Hunters, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Stunning treasures – and macabre slaughter – in Siberia’s Valley of the Kings


By Olga Gertcyk
11 February 2016

Pictured: the gleaming riches no-one was meant to see belonging to an ancient nomad potentate, and his queen…or was she his concubine?

In all, some 9,300 decorative gold pieces were found here, not including the ‘uncountable golden beads’. Picture: Vera Salnitskaya

The royal tomb known as Arzhan 2 in the modern-day Republic of Tuva – to many, the most mysterious region in all Russia – is some 2,600 years old but its valuables match any trove from any era anywhere in the world.

Here inside a mound 80 metres wide was buried a warrior tsar with a sway that plainly reached over a vast territory of mountains and steppes, and whose magnificent possessions indicated close contacts with other civilisations.

Forget the notion of barbaric Siberian nomadic tribes in this epoch: well, don’t quite forget. These ancient warriors used the skulls of their vanquished foes as drinking cups, according to no less an authority than Greek historian Herodotus.

And this queen or concubine was almost certainly sacrificed to that she could be buried beside the dead ruler. And yet, as the pictures show, their exceptional artwork predates the influence of the Greeks, and displays a high degree of sophistication.

Arzhan 2 excavations site


Arzhan 2 excavations site


Arzhan 2 modern look

Unknown warrior was found literally covered in gold alongside with his woman. Pictures: Konstantin Chugunov, Anatoli Nagler and Hermann Parzinger; Vera Salnitskaya

The unknown monarch – a Siberian Tutankhamun – was entombed in this ancient necropolis with 14 horses, a defining symbol of wealth in these Scythian times; each animal was from a different herd.

Alongside him lay the woman in his life, his queen or, as is suspected, his favourite concubine, but in any event a woman held in great esteem who was ethnically distinct from this monarch’s retinue also buried alongside him which included 33 others, including five children. She was in all likelihood not alone in being sacrificed  to accompany him to the afterlife…

The most breathtaking aspect of this Tuvan find are the contents of the burial chamber of this royal couple – pictured here – located by archeologists some two or three metres beneath the surface.

In all, some 9,300 decorative gold pieces were found here, not including the ‘uncountable golden beads’. Put in another way, there was more than 20 kilograms of gold, including earrings, pendants and beads, adorning the bodies of the royal couple all made in what is known as Animal Art style.

King's golden necklace


King's golden necklace


Gorit - Quiver

The ancient ruler was buried with a heavy necklace made of pure gold and gold quiver with fish scale decoration. Pictures: Vera Salnitskaya

Ancient robbers had sought to raid vast burial mound, just as they had successfully looted the neighbouring Arzhan 1 site, which was perhaps 150 years older. It could be that specially built ‘decoy’ graves threw these ancient looters’ off the scent.

Here in Arzhan 2, thieves had left a trail which archeologists unearthed but fortunately the raiders gave up shortly before reaching these treasures, which are made from iron, turquoise, amber and wood as well as gold.

So valuable are they that it is rumoured these wondrous objects – now held mainly in local capital Kyzyl but also in St Petersburg – cannot be exhibited abroad because of the cost of insurance.

The find has been described by Dr Mikhail Piotrovsky, director of the Hermitage Museum as ‘an encyclopedia of Scythian Animal Art because you have all the animals which roamed the region, such as panther, lions, camels, deer…’ It includes ‘many great works of art – figures of animals, necklaces, pins with animals carved into a golden surface’, he told The New York Times.

‘This is the original Scythian style, from the Altai region, which eventually came to the Black Sea region and finally in contact with ancient Greece. And it resembles almost an Art Nouveau style.’

Reconstruction of clothes

The reconstruction of the costumes made by the experts from Hermitage Museum. Picture: Hermitage Museum

Covered with two layers of larch logs, the royal burial chamber was carefully constructed like a blockhouse and stood inside a second, outer burial chamber of the same construction.

The four walls were presumably adorned by some kind of curtain. Long wooden sticks were found along the walls, which could have been used like curtain rails. The curtains themselves, as well as any other textile remains, were not preserved. On a carefully made boarded wooden floor – likely softened by felt – were the bodies of this sovereign and his companion.

The skulls had dislocated from the bodies because they had probably been placed on a kind of pillow, now decayed. The ancient ruler was buried with a heavy necklace made of pure gold and decorated all over with the carvings of animals.

His outer clothes, probably a kind of kaftan, had been decorated with thousands of small panther figures, each 2-to-3 centimetres in length, attached in vertical rows, also forming motifs such as wings on his back.

Queen's necklace


Queen's cup


Queen's cup

A gold pectoral in Animal Style decoration, golden earring with turquoise and a miniature gold cup. Picture: Vera Salnitskaya

On his boots, maybe originally of felt or leather, thousands of mini-beads – in diameter only about 1 millimetre – had been stitched; on the upper part they ended in golden turndowns. Alongside and under the skull were gold plaques with animal-shaped inlays: four winged horses and one deer originally attached to the headgear.

The total weight of his jewellery – including minute glass beads on his trousers – was 2 kilograms. The man’s weaponry consisted of an iron dagger, poorly preserved, on his right hip. This was connected to the belt by a strap, and both had been decorated with numerous golden adornments.

Beside the dagger was a miniature gold cup. On the left side of the deceased was a gold quiver with fish scale decoration. The wooden arrow shafts were painted in black and red. His arrow heads were made of iron, but also showed the remains of golden encrustation. The golden adornment on the belt – used for carrying his quiver into the afterlife – was extremely rich.

Below the quiver lay the wooden bow itself, studded with pieces of golden decoration. Between the quiver and the north-eastern wall of the burial chamber were two picks, one of iron with golden encrustation. To the left of the man’s head lay a bronze mirror.

Abudance


Close view

His outer clothes, probably a kind of kaftan, had been decorated with thousands of small panther figures, each 2-to-3 centimetres in length. Pictures: Vera Salnitskaya

A second, slightly larger bronze mirror was located to the left of the woman’s head, a little bigger and with a gold handle. Below the woman’s head were three gold plaques in the shape of animals – two horses and a mystical winged creature – associated with the woman’s headdress.

Beside her head was a pair of gold pins, decorated with carvings in Animal Art style. The decoration of the woman’s dress corresponded to the man’s kaftan: thousands of golden panthers form different motifs, again, notably, wings on her back. Around her breasts, archeologists found golden earrings and many small beads of gold, amber, garnet, malachite and other precious materials.

Near her feet were thousands of mini-beads made of gold, which must have been fixed onto felt or leather boots which had been inlaid with golden ribbons and granulation.

On her right hip hung an iron knife, poorly preserved but with numerous excellent gold belt adornments. Her wrists were adorned with gold bracelets. Here, too, lay two bronze kettles, seen as exceptionally valuable for these times.

In the western corner of the burial chamber were three large amber beads, a wooden cup with a golden handle, a gold comb with wooden teeth, and a heap of various seeds. Within the heap of seeds was a gold pectoral in Animal Style decoration and a small bronze cup, still inside a small leather bag.

Tiny details


Tiny details


Tiny details

‘It’s hard to imagine that these fine pieces were made by nomads living in tents.’ Pictures: Vera Salnitskaya

In other burials, which surrounded the prominent couple,  bronze knives, an axe-type weapon, known as a Raven’s beak, arrowheads, bronze mirrors, belts, and much jewellery – beads made of glass, stone, amber, and golden earrings – were found. So too were fragments of  cloth – felt, fur, and fabric.

Here too were discovered bridle sets made of bronze, mane ornaments and tail decorations cut from gold sheet.

What can we discern of the personal stories behind these ancient royals and their entourage found in Uyuk hollow, northern Tuva, and excavated by a joint Russian-German team between 2001 and 2004?

Professor Konstantin Chugunov, highly respected senior researcher at the world famous Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg, who headed the project, said DNA analysis of the group indicated those buried here were from the Iranian ethno-linguistic group.

According to the analysis of strontium isotopes in the bones, all those buried were locals except for one person – the ‘queen’, and it gives reason to think about  dynastic marriage,’ he said.

Weapon


Arrow heads

Weapon: an iron dagger and iron arrowheads with golden encrustation. Pictures: Vera Salnitskaya

Totally 35 people – 16 men, 13 women, five children along with bones which cannot be identified by gender, were buried here, as were 14 horses.

The ‘king’ was between 40 and 50 years old and analysis of his remains revealed that he died of prostate cancer. ‘This is the earliest documentation of the disease,’ said Michael Schultz, a paleopathologist at the University of Gottingen. It is believed that in the last years of his life, this potentate could not have walked.

His female partner, accorded pride of place alongside him, was around 30 years old. Who was she?

We don’t know if the woman was a queen or a concubine,’ said Professor Hermann Parzinger, president of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation, and a joint leader of the excavations, ‘but since their ornaments were similar, both must have had high status.’

No cause of death can be detected for her, leading to a theory that she could have been poisoned or strangled, to be buried beside her liege, and to travel with him into the next world: willingly or not, she was a human sacrifice, according to this version.

‘Maybe she was poisoned,’ said Chugunov, ‘or maybe she chose to die to be with her husband.’ We may never know how she died, by natural causes around the same time as her master or in more sinister fashion, but others in the tsar’s entourage certainly had gruesome demises.

Animals


Animals


Fish


Animals

Early Scythians were people who knew good artwork when they saw it, and used contacts to obtain, or commission, jewellery and decorations. Pictures: Vera Salnitskaya

The scene archeologists uncovered here appears to match with remarkable accuracy a description by Herodotus of the macabre Scythian burial rite.

‘Based on accompanying burials, we also found evidence of phenomena described by Herodotus when the living would follow the deceased,’ Parzinger has explained. ‘Herodotus wrote that when a military leader died, his close circle – wife (or concubine), bodyguards, advisers, servants – were killed. As they were the property of the leader, they had to follow him to the tomb. And we identified particular evidence of their murder.’

Herodotus, who lived later, from 484 BC to 425 BC, wrote: ‘The body of the king is laid in the grave, stretched upon a mattress. Spears are fixed in the ground on either side of the corpse and beams stretched above it to form a roof.

‘In the open space around the body of the king they bury one of his concubines, first killing her by strangling, and also his cup-bearer, his cook, his groom, his lackey, his messenger, some of his horses… and some golden cups, for they use neither silver nor brass.’

It is believed that when the king died, he was mummified and his body travelled for 40 days across all his lands. And all expressed their sorrow. Then at some sacred place a burial mound was constructed and his entire entourage were slaughtered and buried there.

Bowl


Bowl

Cups: wooden cup with a golden handle and small golden cup. Pictures: Vera Salnitskaya

Herodotus did not describe how the ruler’s entourage were killed. While the queen or concubine shows no sign of a violent death – the assumption is that she was poisoned – one woman’s skull in Arzhan 2 was pierced four times with a war pick.

A man’s skull still retains the splinters from a wooden club used to kill him. In some cases archaeologists see evidence of blows to the head with kind of poleaxe: in other case, they suppose strangulation or poison.

Separately, on these human remains was found evidence of ‘battlefield surgery’ conducted on these warriors during earlier conflicts. Next to the burial mound, to the north, was found a separate burial where ‘chipped’ human and horse bones were mixed.

A ‘guess’ is that this fits another Herodotus description of the burial mound being guarded by dead horses pulling wagons with their wheels removed on which were placed dead horsemen.

The Greek historian described 50 young men, who were set around the mound. Those, who made the burial, went away and the mound remained. The corpses of the horses and riders were pecked by birds, eaten by animals, and all this decayed.

'Chinese' style


'Chinese' style


'Chinese' style

Decorations on the akinak – or short sword – show similarities to patterns used in Eastern Zhou (Eastern China). Pictures: Vera Salnitskaya

More can be understood about these nomads from the riches lying beside this noble couple, although these ancient people left no written records, and hardly any sign of settlements that – some archeologists suspect – must have existed.

A royal burial such as this gives the ‘quintessence of information’ because the achievements of the culture at the time were laid to rest with the dead king, it has been said. As Parzinger has said: ‘It’s hard to imagine that these fine pieces were made by nomads living in tents.’ Chugunov concurs: ‘In Arzhan 2, the gold jewellery was clearly not made by nomadic artists.’

They fought and pillaged but as Dr Anatoil Nagler, from the German Archeological Institute, told National Geographic: ‘The people were excellent craftsmen. This puts the Scythian quality of life in a new light. It rejects the stereotype that Scythians were just wild horsemen and warriors, migrating and destroying other people. They had a high level of cultural development.’

Or so it seemed at the time when the discoveries were first made. Now it is seen as more likely that these early Scythians were people who knew good artwork when they saw it, and used contacts to obtain, or commission, jewellery and decorations that matched their needs and tastes. Not that anyone was meant to see these treasures encased in the burial tomb.

Golden details


Golden details


Beads


Golden beads


Golden deer

The gleaming riches no-one was meant to see. Pictures: Vera Salnitskaya

Some probably originated on the territory of what is now present-day China; others owe their origins to the Near East, with more seemingly made by Scythians in non-nomadic settlements. Some treasures came from a distance of between 4,000 and 5,000 kilometres from this burial mound, yet at this point there were no contacts with the Ancient Greeks.

Even so, the treasures suggest the lost civilisation of Scythians were culturally more advanced that was once supposed. The experts surmise that it was Scythian craftsmen who cast the daggers, arrowheads, and gold plaques found at this site.

Decorations on the akinak – or short sword – show similarities to patterns used in Eastern Zhou (Eastern China) at around the same period. Bronze jars found in Inner Mongolia are compatible to a small bowl with horizontal a loop-like handle from the main burial in Arzhan 2.

The same applies to methods used in embroidery and the manufacture of earrings, the latter resembling a technique used close to the Aral Sea, some 3,600 km distant. Remains of fruit and seeds of plants found at Arzhan 2 had also come from far afield.

Categories: Ancient Treasure, Archaeology, artifacts, gold, gold chains, gold coins, gold crosses, gold ingots, hidden, Lost gold, Lost Treasure, treasure, Treasure Hunters, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

DEATH VALLEY UNDERGROUND CITY?


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DEATH VALLEY UNDERGROUND CITY?

Several years ago, two men – Jack and Bill (surnames
unknown) – were exploring in Death Valley, near Wingate
Pass, when one of them fell through the bottom of an old
mine shaft.

They claimed to have found themselves in a natural
underground cavern which they followed about 20 miles
northward into the heart of the Panamint Mountains.

“To our amazement,” they reported, “we found ourselves in
a huge, ancient, underground cave city.

“As we explored, we came upon several perfectly preserved
‘mummies’ They wore thick arm bands, and had gold spears.

“The place seemed to have been abandoned for ages, except
for the mummies. The entire underground system looked
very ancient.

“It was apparently once lit by an ingenious system of
lights fed by subterranean gases.

“In one spot was a polished round table. The thought
crossed our minds that it may have been part of an
ancient council chamber.

“There were also large statues of solid gold. And stone
vaults and drawers full of gold bars and all sorts of
gemstones.

“We were intrigued by some heavy stone wheelbarrows. They
were so perfectly balanced and scientifically-constructed
that even a child could use them.

The men reported that throughout the city were huge stone
doors which were almost perfectly balanced by counter-
weights.

They followed the caverns upwards to a higher level. The
caverns ultimately opened out onto the face of the
Panamint Mountains, about half-way up the eastern slope.

HIGH WATER OVER MOUNTAINS?

There were a few exits in the form of tunnel-like quays.

It appeared obvious that the valley below was once under
water. After some thought, they concluded that the arched
openings were ancient ‘docks’ for sea vessels.

Far below in the valley, they could pick out Furnace Creek
Ranch and Wash.

The explorers brought out with them some of the treasure
and tried to set up a deal with certain people, including
scientists associated with the Smithsonian Institute. The
idea was to gain help to explore and publicize the city
as one of the ‘wonders of the world’.

However, to their bitter disappointment, a ‘friend’ stole
the treasure (which was also the evidence).

And worse, they were rejected and scoffed at by the
scientists when they went to show them the ‘mine’
entrance and could not find it. It appeared that a recent
cloud-burst had altered the entire landscape. It did not
look like it had been before.

When Bill and Jack were last seen, they were preparing to
climb the east face of the Panamints to locate the
ancient tunnel openings or quays high up the side of the
steep slope.

But they were not seen again.

DOCTOR GIVES SIMILAR REPORT

In 1946 a retired physician by the name of F. Bruce
Russell told a similar story.

He claimed to have discovered strange underground rooms
in the Death Valley area in 1931. He spoke of a large
room with several tunnels leading off in different
directions.

One of these tunnels led to another large room. It
contained three mummies.

He identified artifacts in the room as similar in design
to a combination of Egyptian and American Indian.

GIANT MUMMIES

What struck him most about the mummies though was their
size – more than eight feet tall.

Dr. Russell and a group of investors launched “Amazing
Explorations, Inc” to handle the release, and profit,
from this find.

But, Russell vanished. And although he had personally
taken his friends there, they were never able to find the
caverns and tunnels again.

The desert can be very deceiving to anyone not used to
traveling it.

Months later, Russell’s car was found abandoned, with a
burst radiator, in a remote area of Death Valley. His
suitcase was still in the car.

Categories: aliens, Aliens and UFO's, Ancient Treasure, emeralds, gold, gold chains, gold coins, gold crosses, gold ingots, Gold Mine, hidden, jewels, Legends, Lost gold, Lost Mines, Lost Treasure, Myths, Strange News, treasure, Treasure Hunters, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Beale Papers…A National Treasure?


With the  release of the Disney motion picture “National Treasure: Book of Secrets,” the idea that America may be home to hidden treasure is capturing the imagination of audiences everywhere. Are there really national treasures linked to great American figures? Could the
Beale Papers, which until now have been a 19th century legend, indicate one such mystery? One
investigative author says yes.

The Beale Papers are three encrypted ciphertexts that have long been thought to point to a treasure in Virginia. The story goes, in 1820, Thomas Jefferson Beale left an innkeeper the encrypted documents telling where he had buried a treasure worth $30 million. Beale was never heard from again, and the mystery was left unanswered. Some have called the story a hoax, but author Kenneth Andrew Bauman provides evidence supporting a case for the mysterious Beale Papers

Categories: Ancient Treasure, artifacts, gold, gold chains, gold coins, gold crosses, gold ingots, hidden, KGC, Lost gold, treasure, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Trove of antique Roman coins found in Swiss orchard…


  • .

Geneva (AFP) – A Swiss fruit-and-vegetable farmer stumbled across more than tree roots when inspecting his cherry orchard recently, uncovering a massive trove of coins buried some 1,700 years ago, archeologists said Thursday.

The trove of more than 4,000 bronze and silver coins dating back to Ancient Rome and weighing 15 kilos (33 pounds) was discovered in Ueken, in the northern canton of Aargau, the regional archeological service said, describing it as one of the biggest such treasures ever found in Switzerland.

A farmer had made the spectacular discovery back in July, when he spotted a molehill with some shimmering green coins.

A few months earlier, remains of an early Roman settlement were discovered in a dig in the nearby town of Frick, so the farmer suspected he may have found Roman coins.

He contacted the regional archeological service and his suspicions were confirmed.

The service announced Thursday that after months of discreet excavations, a total of 4,166 coins had been found in excellent condition.

Their imprints remain legible, allowing an expert to determine they date back to Ancient Rome, stretching from the rein of Emperor Aurelian (year 270-275) to that of Maximilian (286-305), with the most recent coins dated to year 294.

“The orchard where the coins were found was never built on. It is land that has always been farmed,” archeologist Georg Matter told AFP, explaining how the treasure could have laid dormant for so long.

The coins’ excellent condition indicates that their owner systematically stashed them away shortly after they were made, the archeologists said.

For some reason, the owner had buried them shortly after 294 and never retrieved them, the archeologists said.

Some of the coins, made mainly of bronze but with an unusually high silver content of five percent, were buried in small leather pouches.

The archeologists said it was impossible to determine their original value due to rampant inflation at the time, but said they clearly must have been worth at least a year or two of wages.

How much the coins are worth today is beside the point, Matter said, pointing out that the farmer would not be allowed to keep his treasure.

“He will likely get a finders fee,” he said, “but the objects found belong to the public, in accordance with Swiss law.”

The Ueken treasure is set to go on display at the Vindonissa de Brugg Museum in Aargau

Categories: Ancient Treasure, artifacts, gold, gold chains, gold coins, gold crosses, gold ingots, Lost Treasure, roman coins, silver, silver coins, treasure, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

‘Toenail Hoard’ of 500 coin clippings found in Forest of Dean


  • 18 November 2015
Toenail Hoard, Forest of Dean. GloucestershireImage copyrightGavin Warren
Image captionThe 500 silver clippings were unearthed in the Forest of Dean by metal detector enthusiast Gavin Warren

Hundreds of 16th Century coin clippings have been discovered in a Gloucestershire field.

The 500 silver clippings, dubbed the Toenail Hoard, were unearthed by Gavin Warren using a metal detector in the Forest of Dean.

Shaved from the edges of coins dating back to 1560, the precious metal would have been melted down and sold.

Finds liaison officer Kurt Adams said: “Forty to 60 clippings is normal – one of this size is very, very rare.”

Mr Warren – who unearthed the Yorkley Roman coin hoard in 2012 – said he was testing out a “beginner’s metal detector” in a field, when he made the discovery.

“It was about four inches down, all in a big ball – we thought it was pieces of fencing until I spotted the words James I and Elizabeth I,” he said.

“There were about 500 clippings – like pig tails – ranging from half crowns right down to pennies, all silver.”

Toenail Hoard, Forest of Dean. Gloucestershire
Image captionThe earliest clippings date from the 1560s to 1570s and the latest from 1645

With hanging literally too good for those caught clipping the edges off silver coins in the 17th Century, Mr Warren said whoever buried the hoard had been risking their life.

“For women the punishment was being burnt at the stake, for a bloke it was being hung, drawn and quartered,” he said.

“It would have been a lot to have been caught with.”

Mr Adams, from the Portable Antiquities Scheme, said the hoard, currently being catalogued at the British Museum, was not only “one of the biggest” but a “fantastic bit of social history”.

“The earliest clippings date from the reign of Elizabeth I, so 1560s to 1570s, and the latest from 1645,” he said.

“It showed people were defrauding the Mint when it was enormously important that coins weren’t tampered with in any way – so it’s an incredibly rare find.”

Categories: Ancient Treasure, artifacts, England, gold, gold chains, gold coins, gold crosses, gold ingots, hidden, Lost Treasure, Metal Detecting, silver, silver coins, treasure, Treasure Hunting, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Common Treasure Hunters Disease Identified!….


Treasure Hunting can become an addiction.  Just like being addicted to alcohol, sex or drugs; Treasure Hunting can itself become ones drug of choice.  People have been known to forgo family and finances to pursue fantastic fortunes and more times than not, those fortunes are VAPOR!  It is the pursuit of this vapor that is the real Treasure Hunters Disease!

Find Your Fortune

Being a public figure and accessible through Social Media (just search your favorite Social Media outlet for “TreasureForce” and you will find us) one gets exposed to many different types of treasure hunters and the experience runs the gamut.    Here are some of the different Treasure Hunting Types and ALL of these types can suffer from the particular Treasure Hunters Disease this article will be talking about.  They are (in no particular order of importance):

1.  The Recreationist:  This is the hobby hunter that pursues the sport mainly for the adventure and being outside.  As much enjoyment can come from the find as the actual hunt and being in the great outdoors.

2.  The Intelligentsia: These are the treasure hunters (intentionally not capitalized here) that do their work only behind the computer or in online groups.  Offer readily their opinions, but do not actually practice in the field (this meaning – literally in-the-field as in “outdoors”).

3.   The Loreist:  These treasure hunters engage mainly for the history and lore and can be the most passionate and are totally fine if they never make a recovery, they just love the pursuit.

4.  The Artifact Recovery Agents: These are the practicing treasure hunters, locally focused on recoveries and engage for recoveries. Not as a business, but as a hobby or for supplemental income.  They are about recovery and recovery is the payoff.

5.  The Side-Line Coach:  The are the treasure hunters who have engaged in the hunt, in the field, at some time in their career, but may not have an opportunity to continue hunts (usually due to their geographical locations) but have a passion for the hobby and love to share their ideas and techniques with others.

6.  Professional Cacheologists:  Simply out, the Treasure Hunter that makes their living pursing the sport and making recoveries.  Hunting treasure pays the bills and is their career.

No, before I jump off into the common Treasure Hunters disease all of the above can suffer from, let me share some impressive treasure symbol finds.  These symbols and markers were found in areas with KNOWN Lost Treasures and these image are very compelling.

Indian_Face_Colorado This fantastic marker is in Colorado.  Millions of dollars of lost treasure exist within the eye gaze path of the eyes of this ancient Warrior.  Very impressive indeed! 

Map after map and legend after legend speak of this fantastic carved Warrior and many have speculated as to what the eyes actually line up with in the distant horizon.

Even the native peoples from the area speak of the nature and wisdom of this stone face and how it may reveal vast secrets and others know it leads to mass riches of gold and possible ancient Aztec Artifacts known to of been brought to America.

Look at the amazing symmetry and details in this stone carving.  They are impressive.

If you haven never been exposed to this known rock structure and if the story above was all the information you had on this structure, then you would be amazed and impressed.  Rightly so!  But you would be wrong.  Dead wrong and suffering from a condition known as:

Pareidolia

No one is immune.  All of the six different groups of Treasure Hunters – at one time or another – suffer from Martian_face_viking_croppedPareidolia.  What is Pareidolia?

Pareidolia (/pærɨˈdliə/ parr-i-DOH-lee-ə) is a psychological phenomenon involving a vague and random stimulus (often an image or sound) being perceived as significant, a form of apophenia. Common examples include seeing images of animals or faces in clouds, the man in the moon or the Moon rabbit, and hearing hidden messages on records when played in reverse.

The word comes from the Greek words para (παρά, “beside, alongside, instead”) in this context meaning something faulty, wrong, instead of; and the noun eidōlon (εἴδωλον “image, form, shape”) the diminutive of eidos. Pareidolia is a type of apophenia, seeing patterns in random data.  To the right is the most well know photo of Pareidolia.  The Mars viking Image know around the world.

So why am I laying all this out?  No one is immune to mistaking an image, symbol or rock on the ground is REAL-AUTHENTIC and a TREASURE SYMBOL.  In fact, some of us become so enamored with these images that we SWEAR and WILL BET OUR LIFE SAVINGS these are man made carved and excavated symbols, locations or images that we will spend our families life savings in pursuit of the treasure that this symbol PROVES is there.  But there in lay the catch – this is not a symbol and never was a symbol and it is being read as a symbol without any research or conclusive proof of a real treasure.

This Pareidolia occurs when people want to SHORT CUT the investigation and decide to leap ahead and forgo the real forensic work, and investigation and documentation and science work, and just ANNOUNCE “I have made a discovery!”  Point is, just because it looks like a sign does NOT make it a sign.  For example:

What is the difference between a symbol and a treasure symbol?

A symbol can be carved into stone, wood, landscape or put on paper and is the actual act of mans hand.

A Treasure Symbol, is the EXACT SAME AS ABOVE, but one real difference IT LED TO AN ACTUAL RECOVERY OF TREASURE OF SOME KIND!

Do you get the subtle, but very real difference?  The Treasure Symbol LED TO A RECOVERY!

Almost every week people post photos of “KGC-Spanish Valuts” and how they have found one.  But when asked, what they are really saying in actual words is “I found a mix of vague symbols and I think they are KGC and thus I have chosen to conclude there is a KGC Vault nearby in relation to this symbol”.  Know that is some what harsh, but I have a good friend that constantly tells me of his KGC Vault Discoveries and I always ask him the same question:  “Was that a tumbler locked vault or a magnetic combination vault?”  and – you guessed it, he cannot answer since he is really expressing “I think a vault is near”.

So, here is the painful truth.  Just because you announce it as a Treasure Symbol, Man Made Structure or Location of Treasure, it does not make it such until YOU ACTUALLY MAKE A FIND AND RECOVERY!  It is that simple.

Why is this distinction important?  We can all get wrapped up in the wording and forget that what we engage in called Treasure Hunting (no matter the level you participate at) there is science and rules involved.  And ALL signs and symbols to be real have to have a find or recovery attached to them.

Now I do want to point out two well known instances where “calling BS” can have consequences:

1.  The ‘finder” calling the find real and then when debunked they (the finder) calls out the debunk-er with “You are only trying to suppress the truth”.  Then there is the other side of the coin:

2.  The “debunk-er” who has no vested interest in the find or has never been to the find automatically calling “Fraud, Fake or Other”.

None of the two above are really right.  The only one really correct is the individual who puts the time, money and expertise into investigating, documenting, forensic analyzing and researching of the symbol or unique location.  Then and only then can the truth be obtained and then and only then can there be a real educated decision made.

You see, those who call Pareidolia related findings real and are not willing to out in the time and research necessary to PROVE IT UP, hurt the industry of treasure hunters and make everyone look like quacks and flakes.  And on the other side, those who always claim “Fake, Fraud, or Bogus” on everything presented do harm as well.  How?

Those types of people are what keep people from making announcements and sharing what might of never been seen.  The truth is – everyone has to work together to make this work, be counted and come to light.  Those who find MUST go the extra mile and do real research and science (like finding supporting artifacts, or tools or even tool marks) to prove up the site, symbol or landmark.  And those who are the naysayers, need to try to assist, guide and suggest so the real truth can be brought to the forefront, because after all:

WE ARE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER!

Below are some more known Pareidolia symbols and locations:

Paréidolie_CiansBaba_YagaBucegi_Sphinx_-_Romania_-_August_2007

 

Giuseppe_Arcimboldo_-_The_Jurist_-_WGA00837Gotland_Raukar-Hoburgsgubbenbadlands-guardian-buddy

Categories: Ancient Treasure, gold, gold chains, KGC, Treasure Hunting | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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