Ghost Towns

OHIO, GHOST TOWNS, HENRY, OTTAWA AND DEFIANCE COUNTIES


DEFIANCE COUNTY OHIO
GHOST TOWNS
1. Glenburg…on county line, 4 miles West of Evansport
2. Cicero…3 miles North of Rosedale
3. Patton…2 miles Northwest of Hicksville on State line
4. Moates…2 1/2 miles South of Ney
5. The Bend…2 1/2 miles East of Sherwood
6. Ashwood…on the county line, 5 miles Southeast of Sherwood
7. Independence…on the Maumee River and Erie Canal, 5 miles West Southwest of Florida.
OTTAWA COUNTY
GHOST TOWNS
1. Frenchtown…6 1/2 miles Northeast of Limestone
2. Nina…2 1/2 miles Northwest of Camp Perry
3. Peachton…1 miles South of Catawba Island
4. Picolo…2 miles Southwest of Lakeside
HENRY COUNTY
GHOST TOWNS
1. Tubbsville..on the county line, 5 miles Southeast of Archbold
2. Naomi…near the county line, 2 miles North of Gerald
3. Colton…on the railroad, 3 miles Northeast of Liberty Center
4. Gallup…2 1/2 miles South of Hamler
5. Unnamed…an unnamed ghost town was on the road North of teh Maumee River, 1 mile South of Okolona, founded in 1836, it had a tavern and trading post.

 

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Categories: artifacts, Ghost Towns, gold, gold chains, gold coins, Haunting, Legends, Lost gold, silver, silver coins, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Abandoned Village In Michigan That Most People Stay Far, Far Away From…..


Today, most people stay away from Pere Cheney, Michigan (near Roscommon) but it’s not simply because there’s nothing left of the place except the old cemetery. Or because it’s on a difficult to travel road that resembles the ruts made by two wagon wheels.

Categories: Ghost Towns, Haunting, Michigan, Myths, Strange News, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Some GHOST TOWNS OF ILLINOIS


 

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JO DAVIESS COUNTY

1…Council Hill…near the State line on railroad, 7 miles Northeast of Galena
2…Scales Mound…near State line on railroad, 13 miles West of Warren
3…Law…near State line on railroad, 10 miles West of Warren
4…Apple River…on the State line and railroad, 5 miles West of Warren
5…Winston…on railroad, 5 miles East Southeast of Galena
6…Schapville…4 1/2 miles Northwest of Woodbine
7…Blanding…on railroad and Mississippi River, 5 miles West Northwest of Hanover.
8…Old Hanover…in the far Southwest corner ofthe county on railroad and Mississippi River, 4 1/2 miles South Southwest of present Hanover.
9…Derinda Center…5 miles Southeast of Elizabeth
10…Pleasant Valley…on the South County line and the Plum River, 5 miles South Southwest of Willow.
STEVENSON COUNTY

1…Afolkey…4 miles Northwest of Dakota
2…Damascus…4 miles West of Cedarville
3…Winneshiek…5 miles Northeast of Freeport
4…Dunbar…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles South of Freeport
5…Stevens…2 miles North of German Valley
WINNEBAGO COUNTY
1…Letham Park…on the railroad, 5 miles South of Rockton
2…Genet..on the railroad, 3 miles West of Loves Park
3…Alworth…on the railroad, 5 miles East of Seward
4…Elida…on the South County line, 4 miles South of Winnebago
BOONE COUNTY
1…Amesville…near Garden Paririe…old stage coach stop on the Old Galena/Chicago Road.
MC HENRY COUNTY
1…Lawrence…on the railroad, 3 miles Northwest of Harvard
2…Armsby…on the railroad and State line, 3 miles West of Richmond
3…Sonon Mills…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles Southeast of Richmond
4…Johnburg…2 1/2 miles Northeast of McHenry
5…Terra Cotta…on the railroad, 2 1/2 miles South of McHenry
6…North Crystal lake…on the railroad, 2 miles Northeast of Crystal Lake
7…Coral…2 miles Southeast of Marengo
8…Coyne…on the railroad and South county line, 1 1/2 miles West of Huntley.
LAKE COUNTY
1…Hickory…3 miles West of Rosecrans
2…Gilmer…on the railroad, 4 miles Southwest of Mundelein
CARROLL COUNTY
1…Marcus…on the railroad by North County line, 6 miles Northwest of Savanna.
2…Barth…on the North County line, 8 miles North Northwest of Mt. Carroll
3…Palsgrove…on the North County line, 6 miles North of Mt. Carroll
4…Keltner…on the North County line, 7 1/2 miles Northwest of Lanark
5…Hickory Grove…on the railroad, 5 miles East of Savanna
6…Timbuctoo…on the railroad, 5 miles South Southeast of Savanna
7…Big Cut…on the railroad, 3 1/2 miles Southwest of Mt. Carroll
8…Ashdale…on the railroad, 3 miles West of Lanark
9…Nursery…5 miles East of Lanark

Categories: artifacts, Ghost Towns, Haunting, hidden, Metal Detecting, silver, silver coins, treasure, Treasure Hunting, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ajanta Caves of India …


In 1819 deep in the jungles of India, a man is hot on the tail of a wild tiger. Suddenly, he spots something strange in the cliffs high above him. So he climbs up to investigate… and discovers, amazingly, a secret that has lain hidden for hundreds of years. This incredible scene took place in 1819. The protagonist was British cavalryman John Smith, and on that fateful day he was out hunting in what is now Aurangabad, a district of Maharashtra in western India. Close to the Waghora River, he noticed an opening in the rocks above. Realizing that the cave looked man-made, Smith and his party scaled the rocks to take a closer look. Then he fashioned a flaming torch from grass to light his way and tentatively stepped inside. Needless to say, Smith was in for a surprise when he entered the opening in the cliffs. Indeed, he found himself in a grand hall lined with columns, its walls decorated with paintings that were faded by age. Exploring further, Smith discovered a bodhisattva – a carving of a Buddhist devotee at one of the stages of achieving nirvana. Inconceivably, but with typical colonial carelessness, he scratched his name on the body of the statue. He was, therefore, the first of many to leave his mark on what became known as the Ajanta Caves. Located 280 miles to the east of Mumbai, the caves are thought to date back to the second century BC. They consist of 30 halls and feature religious structures hewn into the rock face up to 100 feet above the river below. Experts believe that the caves were created over a period of many hundreds of years. Indeed, after the initial construction in the second century BC, work began on a second group of caves some time around the fifth century AD. The structures here were built for Buddhist monks as a place in which to live and worship. There were, for example, caves allocated for different activities, such as sleeping and education, and many monks would have been trained at the facility. In fact, it is thought that at their peak the Ajanta Caves were home to several hundred men. However, over time, Buddhism began to lose its grip on the region, and Hinduism rose to become the dominant religion once again. Consequently, the caves, with their Buddhist significance, were abandoned, and nature began to reclaim the site. So, for more than 1,000 years, the Ajanta Caves remained buried in a remote corner of India as the world changed around them. Sadly, there was nobody to watch them fall into disrepair as the years passed – apart, that is, from a few local goat herders who used parts of the caves for shelter. But all that changed with Smith and the discovery that he made in 1819. In fact, after that day the fame of the caves spread quickly throughout the world. Certainly, the stunning architecture of the caves and the exquisite artwork found within them soon established the area as an archaeological site of note. In 1844, for instance, the Royal Asiatic Society commissioned Major Robert Gill to recreate some of the stunning paintings that lined the walls of the caves. His task was a difficult one: he had to slave away in intense heat while remaining vigilant to the threat not only from tigers, but also the hostile local Bhil people. Despite such difficulties, however, Gill and his fellow adventurers discovered some incredible treasures that still draw visitors to the Ajanta Caves to this day. Suffice to say, then, that the caves, with their complex system of halls and cells, represent an incredible architectural feat. Indeed, most of the caves are vihara halls, multi-purpose spaces once used for worship, sleeping and living. Each one consists of a central space featuring a Buddhist shrine, surrounded by smaller cells where the monks would go about their daily lives. Interestingly, the first caves to be built were adorned with simple columns and painted with figures from Buddhist teachings. Later, during the second period of construction, more elaborate architecture and artwork appeared. Meanwhile, throughout the caves, thousands of beautiful images recreate stories from the lives of Buddha. For example, men, women and animals are depicted in rich and detailed scenes, painted by skilled artists who studded their work with precious stones. In what’s known as Cave One, an elaborate façade is covered in detailed carvings and reliefs. In others, meanwhile, mound-shaped shrines known as stupas create focal points. Additionally, Cave Two features a series of paintings depicting women in significant and powerful roles – leading some to suggest that a woman may have been responsible for funding at least part of the site. Today, reaching the Ajanta Caves is less of an adventure than it was 200 years ago. Since then, of course, the ropes and ladders that Gill and his contemporaries were forced to climb have been replaced by a modern path, and the caves have firmly taken their place on the tourist map of western India. Indeed, in 1983, the caves won recognition as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, furthering their reputation as a unique and fascinating slice of history. Meanwhile, their location close to the famous Ellora Caves boosted their popularity, and by 2010 the site was attracting almost 400,000 visitors a year. These days, then, a tour of the region isn’t complete without a visit to the Ajanta Caves. And despite the site’s popularity – so great that in 2013 a Mumbai designer launched four replica caves to ease overcrowding – the haunting magic of these vast structures carved into the rock so long ago endures.

Countryside around the Ajanta Caves…
Categories: Ancient Treasure, Archaeology, artifacts, Ghost Towns, Strange News, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Kansas Ghost Towns/Treasure Legends..


OSBORNE COUNTY

GHOST TOWNS

1…Deliverance, near West County Line, 12 miles North of Natroma
2…Kill Creek, 8 miles Southeast of Alton
3…Roundmound, 7 1/2 miles Northeast of Natroma
4…Twin Creek, 8 miles South of Osborne
5…Cheyenne, 5 miles North of Luray

Russell County

Legends

1…A payroll shipment was being transported on horseback to the salt mines
at Kanopilas and was hidden during an attack on Lost Creek along the
Old Butternut Trail.

2…An old mill was once located about 12 miles Southeast of Russell on
the Smokey Hill River and was a gathering place for settlers and outlaws.

GHOST TOWNS

1…Fay, 5 miles Southeast of Fairport
2…Success, 10 miles North of Bunker Hill
3…Balta, on railroad, 5 miles West of Russell
4…Homer, on railroad, 3 1/2 miles West of Bunker Hill

SMITH COUNTY

GHOST TOWNS

1…Ohio, 10 miles North of Kensington
2…Hardilee, 6 miles North Northeast of Kensington
3…Tyner, 10 miles North of Athol
4…Reamsville, 13 miles North Northwest of Smith Center
5…Thornburg, 14 miles North of Smith Center
6…Womer, 6 miles North Northwest of Cora
7…Sherwood, East County Line, 8 miles North of Lebanon
8…Anderson, 7 1/2 miles North of Smith Center
9…Hammer, 5 miles South of Smith Center
10..Oakvale, 10 miles South of Bellaire
11..Stuart, East County Line, 8 miles South of Lebanon
12..Oasis, 5 miles East of Harlan.

Categories: artifacts, Ghost Towns, gold, gold ingots, Gold Mine, Lost Treasure, Outlaws, placer gold, silver, silver coins, treasure, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

El Paso Herald 1910..Gold articles..


Two articles in The El Paso Herald (1910), one on The Old Abe mine in White Oaks, New Mexico (Billy the Kid playground) and one in the Sierra Madre Mountains.

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88084272/1910-11-01/ed-1/seq-9.pdf

Use your photo viewer to enlarge picture.

Categories: Billy the Kid, Ghost Towns, gold, Gold Mine, New Mexico, placer gold, Texas, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Is ‘Two Gun Billy’ the Real McCoy?..Another Billy the Kid photo?


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Posted: Sunday, February 7, 2016 11:00 pm |Updated: 11:57 pm, Sun Feb 7, 2016.

Another photo said to be of the famous outlaw Billy the Kid — showing a young man posing on a rock, holding one pistol in his right hand and another in his holster — surfaced last week.

It is still unauthenticated and lacks provenance.

But like all the other purported Billy the Kid photos, this one has an interesting backstory.

Two Gun Billy is one of nearly 500 photos in an Old West collection believed to have been owned by Frank Phillips, the founder of Phillips Petroleum.

The photos are now owned by an unidentified couple who traveled in the 1990s to Checotah, Okla., where they stopped at an antique store called the Downtown Antique Mall. The woman, who is an artist, purchased several photos from the store to use in painting profiles.

Both she and her husband are Western enthusiasts and, after comparing the photos to those in their books on the Old West, they went back to the antique store the next day, and the day after that, and spent a few hundred dollars on the collection.

The couple believe that 100 of the photos depict people involved in the O.K. Corral shootout, their family members and others from Tombstone, Ariz.

Because there were photos of Phillips and his family among those the woman purchased, she and others who have examined them concluded that they once belonged to Phillips, whose 3,700-acre ranch in northwestern Oklahoma, called Woolaroc, was only 100 miles away from where the photos were purchased. And the property was adjacent to land frequented by outlaws. The photos came to be known as the Phillips Collection.

Jim Williams, a Western antique dealer with a shop in Springfield, Mo., was hired by the couple to help authenticate the photo called Two Gun Billy and market it. Cathy Briley, Williams’ fiancée, a real estate appraiser and collector of antiques from Palmyra, Neb., said they immediately felt the albumen print was of Billy the Kid.

They didn’t have the resources, Briley said, to hire people with the software to do facial recognition — and besides, they were unsure if it would work because the photo shows the Kid in profile. But they did decide to try to find the location where the photograph was taken, and they were pretty sure the landscape depicted New Mexico.

They came here in December, after studying Google Earth images for weeks and weeks. In New Mexico, everyone gave them different opinions. They failed at first and spent the night in Ruidoso before driving home.

It was there when Briley had an idea that the photo might have been taken at the time of the shootout at Blazer’s Mill between the Lincoln County Regulators and the buffalo hunter Buckshot Roberts. The Regulators apparently were hunting down anyone associated with the murder of John Tunstall, which had set off the Lincoln County War. The confrontation took place three days after the shooting of Sheriff William Brady, a crime for which Billy the Kid was convicted in 1881. The Regulators, including the Kid, were supposedly in Blazer’s Mill to eat at Mrs. Godfrey’s Restaurant.

The connection hit Briley, she said, “like a ton of bricks.”

They now believe the photo was taken on a hillside between Lincoln and Tularosa overlooking a 19th-century village called South Fork. The area subsequently became part of the Mescalero Apache Indian Reservation. Williams and Briley believe the photo was taken April 3, 1878, the day before the shootout.

Williams went back to New Mexico and on Jan. 20, Briley said, he found the rock overlooking South Fork on which the Kid had been posed, and matched up the mountains in the background as well as old Indian trails.

Briley said the face looks identical and the body type and size are “perfect” when compared to the authenticated tintype of Billy the Kid purchased by billionaire William Koch for $2.3 million in 2011 at an auction in Colorado.

Furthermore, the figure is wearing patterned suspenders and an unadorned sombrero, and is pictured with the types of guns Billy was known to carry. There’s a bandana wrapped around his leg above his right knee, which could be related to injuries sustained in the Brady ambush, Briley said.

In Koch’s tintype, the Kid looks sloppy, but in this photo, his tie is tucked into his shirt and, according to Briley, he was known as a “snappy dresser.”

Briley said she has seen another photo that surfaced in recent years — one said to show the Kid playing croquet in New Mexico in 1878 — and the National Geographic program that aired about the photo last year. In that case, the photo was bought by a California man for $2 or so from a Fresno County memorabilia shop.

She believes that photo is of the Kid, but she conceded many photos claimed to be of him don’t get received very well. “They get a lot of negative response,” she said. “Western enthusiasts immediately deny them if there’s no provenance attached to the photo.”

So, she said, even though “I do think our photos are the genuine article … we are fighting an uphill battle.”

But that doesn’t stop people who think they have the real deal, she added. “We’re just going to be inundated with photos because people are seeing dollar signs.”

Briley said several photos from the Phillips Collection already have been sold, including those of outlaw Belle Starr and lawman Wyatt Earp’s brother James, and one of Earp himself in a forest with several other people. Two of those were bought by Williams and resold. There are two other photos of the Kid in the Phillips Collection, Briley said.

The original Oklahoma vendor, however, had no idea of their value, she said. Online, Briley called the collection “likely one of the largest historical finds in recent history.”

But Daniel Kosharek, photo curator at the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives in Santa Fe, said the number of Kid photos cropping up is getting to be “almost as bad as Elvis sightings.”

“This one is a pretty good stretch,” he said of Two Gun Billy.

Korsharek said there are many photos that could show the Kid, and even in the Museum of New Mexico collection, he said, he could probably find a half-dozen tintypes that could be of the famous outlaw.

Contact Anne Constable at 505-986-3022 or aconstable@sfnewmexican.com.

Categories: Billy the Kid, Ghost Towns, Old West, Outlaws, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Sweetin Mansion and its Lost Treasure, Greene County, IL….


Engulfed by encroaching vines, trees and brush from the nearby woods, the Sweetin Mansion feels as if it’s hiding a dark secret from the world. Built in 1848 by English immigrant Azariah Sweetin, the house is a shadow of its former glory. The ruin sits in a remote part of the countryside in western Illinois. The crumbed limestone walls and broken timbers slowly destroyed by time only hint at its dark past.

Also known as Hartwell Ranch House and “the old stone house,” the manor was constructed with three floors, walnut woodwork, a grand ballroom, three foot thick walls, and the unsual feature of a natural stream running through the basement for a water supply and to keep the house cool. For some strange reason the Sweetin family didn’t move into the house until fourteen years after construction began.

History has it that on July 4th, 1862, a party was held for two farmhands Henson and Isham who had recently enlisted in the Union army. The two began to quarrel. During the argument Isham thought Henson was going to throw something at him so he pulled out a knife and stabbed Henson in the back. As Henson lay bleeding to death in front of the third floor fireplace, a large stain of blood seeped into the stone floor forming a shape of his body. Many years after the event the blood stain could never be removed. The ghost of the young Henson would often be seen in this area when the house was still intact.
With the country in the middle of the Civil War in the 1860’s many farmers suffered financial hardship but Sweetin prospered during this time trading cattle. Sweetin had a distrust of banks so he began stashing jars of gold coins throughout the property. After a horse riding accident in 1871 Sweetin’s mind was so damaged from being thrown from the horse, he couldn’t remember where he buried his tresaure; his ghost is said to be still searching for it.

Family members had tried in vain to find the gold but where unsuccessful. Treasure hunters have also tried searching, but turned up nothing. There is another legend that two Sweetin farmhands had found the gold and disappeared shortly after Azariah Sweetin had died.

On our journey to this location in June of 2011 the air was hot and muggy when we found the ruin off the main road. We almost drove past the mansion because the vines and trees had hidden much of the outer walls. With a change of clothes we walked through chest-high grass to reach the ruin. (I worried that we could encounter poisonous snakes hiding in the grass.) Large pieces of the wall had fallen and the overgrown trees had made entering the heart of the structure very difficult and precarious. We felt like explorers entering an ancient castle. Inside the structure we saw the stream that still flows through the basement. Large pieces of the wall had disrupted the naturall flow, causing a large pool to form at the inside base of the structure. The large wooden beams that once held the second floor were still set inside their footings. The site was incredible to see but difficult to photograph, with much of the outside structure covered over and mature trees growing on the inside. These obstacles made photographing an exterior and interior overview shot impossible. I was able to obtain only portions of the overall impression this old house ruin made.

We left the Sweetin Mansion very satisfied. The house was well worth the long trip. We can see how legends of haunted ruins have captivated people for years. The sad feeling of a once grand home now destitute makes one wonder what happened to allow its owners to let such a property fade away…
Categories: Ghost Towns, Haunting, hidden, Legends, treasure, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Vermont…Treasure Legends and Ghost Towns


 

Addison County

Treasure Legends

1. In the rocky area known as Hell’s Half Acre at the foot of South Mountain, a cache of between $200,000 and $1 Million in silver bars are buried. The father of a Spaniard named DeGrau worked a rich vein of Silver near Bristol with a group of other prospectors. They amassed such a large quanity of silver ingots that they had to leave a huge amount behind when they left the area. The mining equipment and silver bars were sealed in a cave, but they were never able to return and retrive it.

2. Four Spanish deserters in 1752, left the ship San Jose with 80,000 gold doubloons when the vessle was laid up for repairs at New London. While trying to make their way to Quebec, Canada, they were attacked by Indians, their pack horses were killed, and they had to bury the gold in a space between 2 giant boulders in the area known as Hell’s Half Acre. They fled the indians but never returned.

3. During the Revolutionary War, British Soldiers were seen carrying a heavy payroll chest off of Long Point on Gardiner’s Island. They did not have the chest when they left and it is persumed that they buried it somewhere on the Island.

Ghost Towns

1. Chimney Point…on Lake Champlain near Hwy 17. It was a French trading center in 1690, was attacked and burned in 1759 by Indians.

2. Beldens…on the railroad, 3 miles North of Middlebury

3. South Lincoln…2 miles South Southeast of Lincoln

4. Cream Hill…3 miles North Northwest of Shoreham

5. Richville…1 1/2 miles North of Shoreham Center

6. North Orwell…3 1/2 miles North of Orwell

Categories: artifacts, Ghost Towns, gold, gold coins, Gold Mine, Legends, Lost gold, Lost Mines, Lost Treasure, silver, silver coins, treasure, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized, Vermont | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Possible new photo…Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid….


sharper tin type reversed

FORT SUMNER, N.M. (KRQE) – A flea market treasure could mean big things for New Mexico’s history. A North Carolina man believes he may have a photo of Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid.

Frank Abrams traveled all the way to New Mexico to learn more about an old tintype he purchased years ago. KRQE News 13 followed Abrams to Fort Sumner, New Mexico to try and get to the bottom of this historical mystery.

Billy the Kid’s legend lives on more than a century since his reported death.

“I knew only Billy the Kid from the movies,” Abrams chuckled. But the North Carolina attorney is learning much more about the western outlaw, especially since he may have a photo that could blow the lid wide open on a piece of history.

“The holy grail might exist,” Abrams told KRQE News 13.

Abrams spent $10 on an old tintype at a North Carolina flea market years ago. He said it was the rough looking cowboys that caught his eye.

The tintype sat hanging in a guest room for years.

Recently, the newly-verified photo of Billy the Kid playing croquet, now appraised at $5 million, got Abrams thinking.

“After I Googled Billy the Kid, I said ‘oh my gosh, he looks like Pat Garrett!” Abrams recalled. “And that’s what got it started.”

Legend has it Billy the Kid was killed by Lincoln County Sheriff Pat Garrett in July of 1881.

Convinced his photo shows Garrett possibly with the Kid, Abrams brought high resolution images of his tintype to meet with local experts.

“The improbability of this situation is such that I need to find out,” Abrams told KRQE News 13.

Abrams and his wife flew to New Mexico, then hit the road to Fort Sumner, home to the Billy the Kid museum and his reported gravesite.

Inside the museum’s walls are rare pieces of history, including Billy the Kid’s gun, his wanted poster, and dozens of old artifacts.

Tim Sweet is the museum’s owner. “The first thing when I looked the photograph, the first one that stood out to me was Pat Garrett,” Sweet told KRQE News 13.

Sweet said he’s 95-percent convinced the man with the mustache in Abrams’ tintype is Pat Garrett.

Owner convinced man with mustache is Pat Garrett.
Possible photo of Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid.

“If this is the real deal, Frank has got a jewel right here,” said Sweet.

Finding out who the other men are and why they were together is key. Sweet believes if the tintype is a photo of Billy the Kid, it may have been taken when Garrett and a crew took him to be arraigned, and before Billy’s escape.

Sweet said the capture was cause for celebration. “All of them are smoking cigars,” Sweet pointed out.

There are other features that have him thinking. Abrams points out a defined Adam’s apple on the man he believes to be Billy the Kid, compared to the known photo of the Kid. Both photos show a pronounced Adam’s apple.

Still, Sweet said more research is needed, and more experts need to analyze the tintype.

Sweet, along with local historians, would be curious to figure out why Garrett would have taken a picture with Billy the Kid and when.

If Abrams does have a photo of Billy the Kid and Pat Garrett, Sweet said, “I think it just proves what took place.” It would be the first photograph of the two together, which Sweet admits would be “big.”

Either way, Abrams said his first trip to New Mexico, and the adventure this photo has led him on, is worth it.

“I’m going to do whatever is necessary to find out,” Abrams told KRQE News 13. “This picture would clear up a lot of mysteries, historical mysteries. The truth is the key.”

It took a team of experts more than a year to authenticate the second-known photo of Billy the Kid playing croquet. Abrams said he’s in it for the long haul to get to the truth.

Categories: Ancient Treasure, Billy the Kid, Ghost Towns, hidden, Lost gold, Lost Mines, Lost Treasure, Mexico, Myths, New Mexico, Outlaws, Strange News, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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