Leon Trabuco’s Gold….


Leon Trabuco’s Gold

In 1933, Leon Trabuco was a Mexican millionaire. He believed he could use the Great Depression of the United States to increase his fortune. Convinced the United States would soon devalue the dollar and that gold prices would skyrocket, Trabuco and four other men bought up much of Mexico’s gold reserves to resell in the United States when the price went up.

At a makeshift Mexican foundry, gold coins and jewelry were melted down and cast into ingots. In less than three months, he and partners had collected almost sixteen tons of solid gold. They smuggled the gold into the United States, where if caught, they faced long prison terms. Trabuco searched for a safe place to hide the illegal treasure, but eventually, he decided it would be smarter to bury the gold. In the heat of the summer, he hired a pilot named Red Moiser to make several covert flights into the New Mexico desert for Trabuco.

It is believed that Trabuco chose a sparsely populated region near the Ute and Navajo Indian Reservations in New Mexico. Moiser allegedly made sixteen flights, carrying one ton of gold each time, taking them to pick-up trucks that transported them to burial site. Trabuco never revealed the location and was careful not to create a map. When the Gold Reserve Act of 1934 passed, the price of gold soared, but instead they waited for prices to soar higher.

Unfortunately, the Gold Act of 1934 made private ownership of gold illegal, and Trabuco was unable to cash in on his scheme. Over the years, he and his partners all died untimely deaths. Trabuco took the location of the gold to the grave.

Treasure hunter Ed Foster has searched for Trabuco’s Treasure in the desert around Farmington, New Mexico for over thirty-five years. He is convinced that he found the 1933 landing strip used by Red Moiser at a plateau called Conger Mesa. He has spoken with an Native American lady and Navajo woman who was six years old in 1933 who both recalled a plane that would land and take-off from there. Ed said she remembered several Mexican men who lived on the Reservation.

He also found an old Navajo home unlike any other on the reservation about twenty miles west of the mesa. It was probably meant as a guard post to guard the gold. It is a Mexican-style structure with windows, a front door, a back door and a veranda. Not far away is Shrine Rock inscribed with a date and the words: “1933 16 Ton.” Ed believes the gold could be hidden away somewhere in the vicinity of these three points.
Treasure hunter Norman Scott believes Trabuco’s Treasure has an air of authenticity to it. He believes that with available technology, it is only a matter of time before it is discovered.

It is believed that the treasure consisted of Mexican gold bought by several millionaires.

Categories: gold, gold coins, gold ingots, hidden, Legends, Lost gold, Mexico, Old West, Treasure Hunters, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Legends, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

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3 thoughts on “Leon Trabuco’s Gold….

  1. Richard Lansdowne

    I was working for the Navajo as a “mining financial analyst”, and back in 2003 or maybe 2004, a prospector and treasure hunter came in to talk to my boss, who was head of the Navajo Nation Minerals Department. This guy was big, maybe 6 foot 3 or 4 inches tall, and about 50 – 55 years old. I sat in on the conversation. He wanted to make a deal with the Navajo. He was sure he knew where this Trabuco treasure was, and wanted us to allow him access to tribal land to search for it, and in return he would split the proceeds from it if he found it. He was a real western type, tanned, rangey, wore a western belt buckle and blue jeans, with blue eyes and had a ‘howdy partner’ demeanor about him. And he was entertaining as well, with stories – he told us he’d been shot a couple of times in the course of his treasure hunting days, and I believe was on the verge of showing us the bullet scar from one shot in his gut when either I or my boss asked him some question or other. It might have been this Ed Foster. He gave me his business card, but I can’t seem to find it. It was a number of years ago. Sadly, my boss, while willing to listen to him, for about an hour or more, refused to strike a deal with him. After he left, we never saw or heard from him again. I always wondered what happened to him.

    • Hello Richard, it seems Ed Foster has dropped off the map. There have been numerous inquires trying to make contact with him on several treasure hunting forums. Too bad you can not find the card, it might be the only one with any contact information around.

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