Monthly Archives: February 2013

Want to find his hidden treasure worth millions?…Hidden 3 years ago…


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Forrest Fenn, 82, believes too many Americans spend their free time watching TV or playing video games. He hopes the bounty he hid — a chest filled with millions of dollars in gold coins, diamonds and emeralds, among other gems — will prompt some to explore the outdoors. “Get your kids out in the countryside, take them fishing and get them away from their little hand-held machines,” he told TODAY.

Fenn hid the chest in a secret spot three years ago with two goals in mind: Getting people to fall in love with America’s scenic trails and passing on what he calls the “thrill of the chase,” something he has experienced over more than seven decades of hunting for rare objects.
“The Thrill of the Chase” is also the title of Fenn’s self-published autobiography, which contains an unusual map to the treasure, a poem with 9 clues in it. “Begin it where warm waters halt, and take it in the canyon down, not far, but too far to walk,”

The chest, weighing in at over 40 pounds, constructed in the 13th Century, contains items Fenn has accumulated over more than seven decades.

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Beretta Considering Leaving Maryland Because of Unfriendly Gun Law Legislation….


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The almost 500-year-old firearms manufacturer, Beretta, is considering leaving the state of Maryland because of unfriendly gun laws that advanced in the Maryland General Assembly last week.

According to the Washington Post, Beretta has invested more than $1 million in the production of a civilian version of a machine gun designed for special operations forces and has already made plans to expand its plant in Maryland to ramp up production. But with the new gun laws making their way through the legislative process, the expansion is in jeopardy.

But under an assault-weapons ban that advanced late last week in the Maryland General Assembly, experts say the gun would be illegal in the state where it is produced.

Now Beretta is weighing whether the rifle line, and perhaps the company itself, should stay in a place increasingly hostile toward its products. Its iconic 9mm pistol — carried by every U.S. soldier and scores of police departments — would also be banned with its high capacity, 13-bullet magazine.

“Why expand in a place where the people who built the gun couldn’t buy it?” said Jeffrey Reh, general counsel for Beretta.
The Maryland legislation would ban assault rifles, magazines with more than 10 bullets, and any new guns with two or more “military-like” features. The new rifle, a semiautomatic ARX-160, would almost certainly be banned.

Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. (D – Calvert) said, “I’m concerned. I think they’re going to move. They sell guns across the world and in every state in the union – to places a lot more friendly to the company than this state.”

This isn’t the first time Beretta has threatened and carried out a move; When Maryland upped gun restrictions in the 1990’s Beretta moved its warehouse operation to Virginia. “I think they thought we were bluffing,” Reh said. “But Berettas don’t bluff.”

One side note to consider: Seeing as how well Chicago has fared with its strict gun control laws, is this gun control legislation a little bit of grandstanding by Democratic Governor Martin O’Malley? His name has been floated around as a possible presidential nominee in 2016, so this gun control legislation could stamp his name on an explicitly liberal agenda. However, it looks like that agenda could come with an economic price – I can’t imagine he wants to push out all of those jobs. Welcome to the free market, Mr. O’Malley.

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International Precious Metals Storage Firm Turns Away U.S. Customers….


The U.S. tax and regulatory environment inflicted another casualty last week. ViaMat, a Swiss firm providing vaulting and transport services for bullion and other valuables, threw in the towel and instructed U.S. customers they will need to go elsewhere:

“We are currently experiencing rapid and substantial changes in the general regulations within this business. The changes mainly relate to the tax structures and taxation systems of various countries. As a consequence of these changes VIA MAT INTERNATIONAL has taken the decision to stop offering this service at its vault [sic] outside of the U.S. to private customers with potential U.S.-tax liability.”

The move mirrors action taken by Wegelin, the oldest bank in Switzerland, back in 2011. The bank stopped accepting business from the U.S., rather than buckle under pressure from U.S. regulators and hand over confidential account information.

To be clear, the regulations impacting ViaMat and other firms are focused on U.S. citizens with assets overseas. Investors storing precious metals inside the U.S. are not subject to any new rules — at least for now.

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Precious Metals Market Update………..


The metals markets open the new week battered after a second week of heavy selling that pushed prices through lower support levels. These prices have not been seen since last August.

Prices suffered last week after traders in the futures markets sold in reaction to bearish technical signals, including gold’s 50-day average price falling below the 200-day average. Investors also reacted to the release of the latest Federal Reserve meeting minutes which included hints that the Fed may need to tighten monetary policy.

As usual, the heavy selling in futures markets was met with heavy buying in the physical bullion markets. Bargain hunters came out to take advantage of the big downward move and kept our Specialists at Independent Living Bullion very busy.
Current spot prices:
Gold: $1,590oz, down $21 (was $1,611) from this time a week ago.
Silver: $29.10- down $.99 (was $30.09) week-over-week.
Platinum: $1,623 – down $67 (was $1,690) since last Monday.
Palladium: $753/oz – down $8 (was $761) from this time a week ago.

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Legal pot in Colo., Wash. poses growing dilemma…..


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It may be called weed, but marijuana is legendarily hard to grow.
Now that the drug has been made legal in Washington and Colorado, growers face a dilemma. State-sanctioned gardening coaches can help folks cultivate tomatoes or zucchini, but both states have instructed them not to show people the best way to grow marijuana. The situation is similar in more than a dozen additional states that allow people to grow the drug with medical permission.
That’s leaving some would-be marijuana gardeners looking to the private sector for help raising the temperamental plant.
“We can’t go there,” said Brian Clark, a spokesman for Washington State University in Pullman, which runs the state’s extension services for gardening and agriculture. “It violates federal law, and we are a federally funded organization.”
The issue came up because people are starting to ask master gardeners for help in growing cannabis, Clark said. Master gardeners are volunteers who work through state university systems to provide horticultural tips in their communities.
The situation is the same in Colorado, where Colorado State University in Fort Collins recently added a marijuana policy to its extension office, warning that any employee who provides growing assistance acts outside the scope of his or her job and “assumes personal liability for such action.”
The growing predicament is just the latest quandary for these states that last year flouted federal drug law by removing criminal penalties for adults over 21 with small amounts of pot. In Washington, home-growing is banned, but it will be legal to grow pot commercially once state officials establish rules and regulations.
In Colorado, adults are allowed to grow up to six marijuana plants in their own homes, so long as they’re in a locked location out of public view.
At least two Colorado entrepreneurs are taking advantage of that aspect of the law; they’re offering growing classes that have attracted wannabe professional growers, current users looking to save money by growing their own pot and a few baby boomers who haven’t grown pot in decades and don’t feel comfortable going to a marijuana dispensary.
“We’ve been doing this on our own, but I wanted to learn to grow better,” said Ginger Grinder, a medical marijuana patient from Portales, N.M., who drove to Denver for a “Marijuana 101” class she saw advertised online.
Grinder, a stay-at-home mom who suffers from lupus and fibromyalgia, joined about 20 other students earlier this month for a daylong crash course in growing the finicky marijuana plant.
Taught in a rented room at a public university, the course had students practicing on tomato plants because pot is prohibited on campus. The group took notes on fertilizer and fancy hydroponic growing systems, and snipped pieces of tomato plants to practice cloning, a common practice for nascent pot growers to start raising weed from a “mother” marijuana plant.
Ted Smith, a longtime instructor at an indoor gardening shop, led the class, and warned these gardeners that their task won’t be easy. Marijuana is fickle, he said. It’s prone to mildews and molds, picky about temperature and pH level, intolerant to tap water.
A precise schedule is also a must, Smith warned, with set light and dark cycles and watering at the same time each day. Unlike many house plants, Smith warned, marijuana left alone for a long weekend can curl and die.
“Just like the military … they need to know when they’re getting their water and chow,” Smith said of the plants.
The class was the brainchild of Matt Jones, a 24-year-old Web developer who wanted to get into the marijuana business without raising or selling it himself. As a teenager, Jones once tried to grow pot himself in empty Home Depot paint buckets. He used tap water and overwatered, and the marijuana wilted and died.
“It was a disaster,” he recalled. Jones organized the class and an online “THC University” for home growers, but his own thumb isn’t green. Jones said he’ll be buying his marijuana from professional growers.

The course showed would-be grower Cael Nodd, a 34-year-old stagehand in Denver, that marijuana gardening can be an intimidating prospect.
“It seems like there’s going to be a sizable investment,” he said. “I want something that really tastes good. Doesn’t seem like it will be that easy.”

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Hiding in plain sight: How invisibility saved New Mexico’s Jicarilla Apache…


A nomadic tribe pushed into New Mexico by frontier settlement, the Jicarilla slipped off the radar and became the last tribe to avoid forced settlement onto an American Indian reservation

North America’s Jicarilla Apache tribe cloaked themselves in trade, diplomacy, and intermarriage and nearly escaped incarceration on an American Indian reservation. How they did it has been a mystery of the historical American Southwest – until now.

“In some ways, the Jicarilla still remain invisible,” according to anthropologist B. Sunday Eiselt at Southern Methodist University, Dallas.

The Jicarilla Apache, an amalgamation of nomadic tribes that in the 18th century migrated off the plains and settled in the northern Rio Grande of New Mexico, were accustomed to armed resistance, guerrilla tactics and inter-tribal warfare.

They fought alongside the Pueblo Indians in the Revolt of 1680 and later resisted Comanche raiders, sometimes as contract fighters and security guards for the Spanish and American trade caravans. Then quietly, deliberately and peacefully they slipped off the radar of Spanish colonization and U.S. Manifest Destiny until 1888, when the Jicarilla became the last Native American tribe forcibly settled on a reservation.

Invisibility was no accident, rather a strategy for survival

“This was not an accident of history,” says Eiselt. The Apache, particularly the Jicarilla, were experts at invisibility — not just physically, but also socially and economically. For example, Jicarilla warriors on raids would paint themselves during the journey to the plains with white clay to avoid detection by their enemies.

The protocol beckoned supernatural or spiritual protections to bring the warriors home safely. Just as white clay was a warrior strategy for self-preservation, it stands as a metaphor for the primary message of the book.

“By ‘becoming white clay’ in their social and economic dealings,” Eiselt contends, “the Jicarilla turned the tables on non-Indian expansion and disappeared into the cultural fabric of the Southwest’s Pueblo colonies as other Native Americans were being forced onto reservations.” The Jicarilla, without firing a shot, not only avoided confinement and even extermination for nearly two centuries, they rescued their culture from extinction.

How did they manage it?

“The Jicarilla essentially colonized the colonies,” says Eiselt, an expert on the Jicarilla. “They became invisible to government authorities because they were always on the move, they intermarried with the Pueblo and Hispanic peoples, and they established long-standing trade with them. They disappeared by becoming essential, an everyday part of the frontier society of New Mexico, which sustained Spanish, Mexican and ultimately U.S. interests.”
Encapsulation of one society within a larger, dominant or more powerful society is a phenomenon known as enclavement. As a strategy it was not new to the ancestors of the Jicarilla. In fact, enclavement may have occurred multiple times as their Athapaskan ancestors migrated from Canada to the American Southwest beginning as early as the 12th century, Eiselt says.

That phenomenon, however, makes the Jicarilla difficult for scholars to study. Unlike Pueblo archaeology and history, the Jicarilla for the most part have existed outside the realm of historical scholarship in spite of their importance to the social fabric and the economy of New Mexican villages after the fall of the Spanish empire.

Today, bases of tipi rings such as the ones Eiselt discovered during field work in the Rio del Oso Valley of New Mexico, are all that remain of historic Jicarilla homes in the archaeological record. Tipi ring stones would have been used to secure the superstructure. Images at http://bit.ly/VUzILa.

Jicarilla contribution to New Mexico’s history is underappreciated

“Few scholars recognize how significant the Jicarilla contribution was to the survival of the traditional cultures of New Mexico,” says Eiselt, whose new book “Becoming White Clay” (U. of Utah Press, 2012) is a comprehensive study of one of the longest-lived and most successful nomadic ethnic group enclaves in North America. “There hasn’t been a whole lot of research into the Jicarilla, even though they’ve always been there and their contribution to New Mexican history is almost entirely underappreciated.”

Eiselt’s research drew on archaeological investigations, Native American land claims cases, U.S. government agency records, Spanish and Mexican records, oral histories and the tribe’s myths and legends. “Ironically, being invisible is not just how the Jicarilla are, but often how they are ‘seen’ or even missed by scholars of the Southwest,” Eiselt says. The tribe resides today on reservation land in northwestern New Mexico.

“Sunday Eiselt has produced the definitive work on Jicarilla Apache history and archaeology,” says Ronald H. Towner, University of Arizona. “She uses a strong theoretical approach to enclavement and combines history, archaeology and ethnohistory to not only describe past Jicarilla movements and cultural development throughout the Southwest, but to explain how and why Jicarilla social organization at different scales structured that development during times of warfare, removal from traditional lands and economic stress. Eiselt’s scholarship is second-to-none.”

B. Sunday Eiselt is an assistant professor of anthropology at Southern Methodist University and is active in anthropological fieldwork at the SMU Taos campus. She is author or co-author of books and articles on the Jicarilla and Hispanic societies of New Mexico, community-based and engaged approaches in archaeology and ceramic source geochemistry.

“The scholarship is broad, intrinsically sound, and highly significant to the discipline of archaeology today,” says John W. Ives, Institute of Prairie Archaeology and professor of Northern Plains archaeology, University of Alberta. “The author has a fluid, lucid style, making her subject matter readily approachable to both the professional and the interested lay reader.”

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Brewer: Border not Secure, Drug Cartels ‘Ready to Come Across’…..


Gov. Jan Brewer, R-Ariz., says she has first-hand evidence Mexican drug cartels are on the verge of breaching her state’s border.

“I was just down there last week,” Brewer said in an interview on Fox News.

“I was with the National Guard. I was in a Blackhawk. I saw them on the other side, the drug cartels, ready to come across in the middle of the night. It is not secure.”

Brewer said the border is not secure, the fences aren’t completed and there isn’t enough law enforcement on the ground.
Brewer says any immigration reform legislation will stall until the situation is rectified.

“The ranchers will tell you, if you sit down and talk to them, that they’re fearful, that the border patrol is too far north,” she said.

“They need to get closer to the border because they let them go so far, and then they just sort of blend in, and they’re destroying their land and destroying their cattle, they’re destroying their water.

They’re frustrated. And I believe that until the ranchers, law enforcement, is satisfied and they tell us that this border is secured, there’s not going to be a whole lot of movement.”

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Obama threatens veterans’ gun rights……


The Obama administration has launched into a campaign that threatens the Second Amendment rights of American military veterans.

You won’t believe the “warning” letters the vets are receiving from the feds.
DISARMING AMERICA’S HEROES: Veterans Receiving Letters Prohibiting The Purchase, Possession, Receipt, Or Transport Of A Firearm Or Ammunition…

Follow the link below to see the actual letters that Veteran’s are receiving:
http://redflagnews.com/headlines/disarming-americas-heros-veterans-receiving-official-letters-prohibiting-them-from-purchasing-possessing-receiving-or-transporting-a-firearm-or-ammunition

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The Detecting Corner…Sunday 7:00PM Eastern Time


THE DETECTING CORNER WITH KENNY BRIGGS AND ED CROPSKI.

Kenny and Ed will be discussing the various types of metal detectors, how to use them, what you can find and much more. Callers can ask questions and get answers from two of the foremost people in the detecting hobby…over 60 years of combined experience will be at your finger tips to help you with the greatest hobby in the world.

Click the link below for how to join in and listen or call into the Radio show.

http://thedetectinglifestyle.com/

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Stricter gun laws alone won’t stop America’s urban violence..By Peggy Rambach


Getting guns off the streets or out of the hands of criminals won’t by itself address the problem of gun violence in poor urban communities. America needs to address the underlying circumstances that lead people like my inmate students to gun violence in the first place.
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When my students told me that they hated guns, I was surprised. That’s because my students are criminals incarcerated at Suffolk County House of Correction, a medium security prison in Boston where I teach creative writing. I found out about this relationship with guns the day Mario (I use only his first name to protect his identity) read his poem “The Hammer.” It described how a gun at first empowers a man, but then, like an addiction, the man is overpowered by the gun, and the gun leads him to his death. Apparently, the poem spoke for the whole class. They all said that they wished they’d never laid their hands on one.
But many of them will pick one up the minute they’re back on the street. Not because of the gun. Because of the street.
In the wake of Newtown, there’s been a huge push for gun control – not just to protect children in suburban schools from mass shootings but to minimize the more frequent gun violence that dominates our urban streets. As I’ve learned from my students, getting guns off the streets or out of the hands of criminals won’t by itself address the problem of gun violence in poor urban communities. America needs to address the underlying circumstances that lead people such as my students to gun violence in the first place.
Especially if their lives resemble the life of my student Robert. He grew up in the 1980s at the height of the crack epidemic, turned up the volume on the TV to drown out his parents’ fights over his father’s habit, and lived in an apartment where a bullet just missed him one day when it flew through his window.
When Robert was 10 years old and walking to school in a snowstorm, a guy shoved a gun in his face and, as Robert wrote, stole his coat, hat, and shoes. Whoever had guns had all the power, Robert said, “and the GI Joe I played with, had a [big] gun, too.” Robert’s first offense was for illegal possession of a firearm, and so was his second.
My students carried guns, but they also know that guns bring nothing to their life that is good. The day Harvey tried writing a poem about how it felt to be shot, the class spoke over each other to help him get it right, and I found out that just about every other man in the room had been shot, too.
In my student Tali’s short story, a bodega owner didn’t send off his customers with a “Have a good day,” but said, instead, “Be careful out there.”
And Mike, running through nearby Charlestown, armed with a 2X4 to do battle against a gang he didn’t know and had nothing against, compared the sound of his and his friends’ feet to the march of an infantry.
“It was either him or me” was how Basil ended a poem describing a shoot-out.
I’ve never been in a war zone, but I don’t think it’s a stretch to compare one to the streets where my students live when they aren’t behind bars. And like many veterans, my students, too, are physically and mentally scarred: like Mike, after that Charlestown brawl, when he discovered at the age of 13 that he was capable of beating someone nearly to death. Like Harvey, who tried and was unable emotionally, to write about getting shot. All of them, out on the street expect to be ambushed, and are traumatized from witnessing the sudden and violent deaths of friends, siblings, and cousins. My students also lose loved ones to suicide, and some attempt it themselves.
Yes, they are part of the violence; they contribute to this way of life, and many of the younger men, the ones in their twenties, are still seduced by it. But once they hit 30, most of my students want to find their way out. And one way, temporarily, is prison.
Prison, my student Robert wrote, was the first place he ever felt safe. If there were any weapons on the inside, he said, he could be pretty sure they wouldn’t be guns. Suddenly, the fear that had dominated and determined the direction of his life, was gone. Free from fear, Robert was free to begin to discover who he was.
The majority of my students grow up on society’s margins, so a centralized issue like the one on gun control has little bearing on their lives. After all, they purchase their guns illegally. Yes, we should keep guns out their hands, but if the criminals I know had been given no reason to want one they’d have never become criminals in the first place. Implement and fund the social policies and programs that will eradicate the causes for their fear, and my students won’t be condemned to find sanctuary behind prison walls simply because they were too young to know that they would never find it in a gun.
Peggy Rambach is the author of a novel “Fighting Gravity” (Steerforth Press) and the editor of two anthologies published by Paper Journey Press that emerged from her work teaching writing in the social service and health-care sectors. A second novel is forthcoming from Paper Journey Press. You can read her students’ work at http://www.peggyrambach.com.

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